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Unread postPosted: July 18th, 2016, 7:30 pm 
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The dippers carban tax will cost the average family up to $1000/per year, cost good jobs in the coal industry, force Alberta to buy energy from places like BC or Saskatchewan and not move the climate needle on iota.
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What’s going on right now in Alberta is truly sad. A once proud economic gem of a province is being ravaged by incompetent provincial government policy decisions.

While it’s true Alberta’s NDP government inherited a tough economic situation, they’ve made the situation worse … much worse. All of Canada should be watching Alberta and taking note of “what not to do.”

The first lesson is simple – when a province’s key industry is suffering, kicking it while it’s down won’t help. But that’s exactly what Alberta’s government did.

When Premier Notley and fifty rookie NDP MLAs were elected in 2015, it was clear that Alberta’s oil and gas sector was hurting. Oil prices had plummeted sharply and significant job losses were forecast for the province.

Her government responded by announcing a “royalty review”, a committee that would consider raising the charges oil and gas companies had to pay the government. While the Notley government didn’t proceed with any significant increases, nine months passed before the decision was announced, creating uncertainty and damaging investor confidence in the mean time – especially when juxtaposed with other concerning decisions.

Once Premier Notley settled into office, her government hired a plethora of political staff who had been quite vocal against the oil sector and pipelines. Further, one NDP Minister, Lori Sigurdson, even went to B.C. during the federal election to campaign for a candidate who had organized anti-pipeline rallies. If you were a global CEO would you want to invest $300 million in a project located in a jurisdiction run by anti-oil politicians and senior staff?

Early on, the NDP government also raised business taxes by 20% – another significant blow to the oil and gas sector and other businesses. The tax increase starved businesses of millions of dollars they could have used to reinvest in their companies and create jobs. That’s lesson two: raiding businesses for money – especially during a recession – makes no sense. Doing so only reduces the amount of money those businesses have to employ people.

Notley and team have also introduced large personal income tax increases and have planned to increase gas and carbon taxes by $10 billion over the next five years. Her government has also introduced radical reforms to the province’s electricity sector – changes which some experts have suggested could lead to a tripling of rates. Instead of learning from Ontario’s electricity reform debacle, Alberta is importing the same failed plan.

Finally, the NDP government has also started to fulfill its reckless commitment to raise the minimum wage from $10.20 to $15.00 by 2018. How can businesses afford a 47% increase to labour costs in just four years in the middle of a recession? Many can’t.

Recent news stories have noted the steep minimum wage hikes as a contributing factor to business closures and layoffs.

The NDP government’s defiance of economic common sense has definitely taken a bad situation and made it worse. Many fear the province’s surging 7.8% unemployment rate could get even worse.

That brings us to lesson three – if you elect politicians who run on a reckless economic platform, don’t be surprised if your economy suffers as a result.
http://www.torontosun.com/2016/06/26/al ... tion-worse

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Unread postPosted: July 18th, 2016, 7:53 pm 
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Nothead's government is the destructive anywhere in Canada by a long shot, but Ottawa is pretty stupid too.
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We are living in an age of economically clueless governments, both federally and provincially.

The best recent example came last week in Calgary.

It’s Stampede Week in the Cowtown. That means a steady stream of politicians from all levels of government passing through to flip pancakes and shake hands.

One of the flippers and shakers was Bardish Chagger, Ottawa’s Minister of Small Business and Tourism.

Predictably, the 36-year-old southwestern Ontario Liberal was asked about her government’s failure to live up to its campaign promise of last year to lower the tax rate on small business from 11% to 9%.

Her answer demonstrated just how economically clueless the Trudeau government is.

“We ran on a platform and we’re committed to that platform,” Chagger insisted.

But spending priorities, she said – including spending on economic stimulus – has to come before tax cuts.

“In speaking to entrepreneurs,” the minister added, “I’ll ask them do you want a tax cut or do you want more revenue in your business? Any day they’ll pick more revenue. If we can actually grow this economy, the possibilities are endless.”

And that’s where the cluelessness kicks in.

First, cutting taxes IS a way to increase revenue in a business. Indeed, it is the simplest and most direct way.

If governments take less of a business’ revenues through taxes, it immediately increases the revenue in that business.

Second, believing that government needs to grow an economy before businesses can benefit – that government is better than entrepreneurs at growing the economy – is politically delusional. And arrogant.

For governments to get more revenue into businesses by keeping taxes high and through stimulus spending – rather than through tax cuts – requires more bureaucracy.

It requires government to take money, administer that money, decide which projects get the money, monitor how the money is used and hope (against hope) the money somehow gets something as huge as the Canadian economy moving.

It is a clear indication politicians believe they and their bureaucrats know better than businesswomen and men how to grow businesses.

It is also the ultimate in trickle-down economics.

Among lefties and liberals, the Ronald Reagan-era concept of tickle-down economics (create the conditions for businesses to boom and everyone, including workers, will benefit) is scoffed at as unfair and foolish.

But it is less foolish than the notion, promoted by Chagger and most other lib-left politicians, that governments can use higher taxes to pump up the economy, which will eventually trickle down more revenues to small businesses and families.

The best thing governments can do is get out of entrepreneurs’ way and watch the economy mushroom.

But Chagger isn’t alone in her cluelessness.

The Alberta NDP government of Premier Rachel Notley has made dozens of similar statements.

My favourite was the premier’s insistence last November that her upcoming, $3-billion-a-year carbon tax would be “revenue neutral". Really!? She was going to cut $3 billion in other taxes while imposing her new carbon “levy”?

No. Notley actually thought a tax was revenue neutral if the government collecting it spent all the money as soon as it came in.

By that clueless understanding, nearly all taxes are revenue neutral.

Since coming to office 14 months ago the Alberta NDP have ramped up taxes (with much, MUCH more ramping to come).

Plus, seemingly every day, or every other day, they have made an announcement of tens of millions (even billions) of dollars they will be spending on some new stimulus package.

This is akin to encouraging a bird to fly by placing a huge weight (taxes) on its tail, then blowing a weak fan (stimulus) in its face.
http://www.edmontonsun.com/2016/07/16/o ... ng-economy

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Unread postPosted: July 18th, 2016, 8:03 pm 
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More destruction of working Albertans.
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Sure, Alberta can transition from coal-fired electricity to renewables – wind farms, water power (hydro) and solar farms.

Sure, if we’re willing to pay two to four times more for power than is now the case.

The best, least-cost solutions to lower air pollution and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Alberta are all about natural gas, not renewables.

The provincial government has decreed all coal-burning plants in Alberta must be shut down by 2030. Half that power, 4,200 MW, must be replaced by renewables – at this point, meaning wind farms.

There’s so much here that doesn’t make sense either economically or environmentally.

Shutting down older coal-burning plants makes sense. They do pollute. Three of them have effectively finished their life-cycle and will come off-line, as per federal government environment regulations, by 2019.

Shutting down our newest coal-burning plants by 2030 does not make sense. They are designed to last much longer. Built with stringent pollution and GHG controls, their emissions are well within existing, strict federal standards.

Replacing the old, soon-to-shut-down coal plants with new natural gas fired units makes sense. Natural gas is cheap like borscht and in such supply that it will stay cheap for decades to come. Clean-burning natural gas meets every environmental standard we have, and will continue, with new emission-lowering technologies, to deliver clean, cheap, reliable power.

Insisting half our post-coal energy production must come from renewables makes no sense whatsoever. Wind farms are expensive to build, expensive to hook into the electricity grid — a grid designed in any case to carry power from today’s big coal and natural gas generating plants to our cities and industrial parks.

Renewables are feast or famine. Either there’s no power when there’s no wind, or there’s too much power when the wind blows down those valleys where almost all the current wind farms are located. Electricity storage technologies will one day change the cost equation, but nothing has yet shown up.

Since wind is not reliable, gas-fired plants still have to be built as back-up.

In a province rich in natural gas, wind or large-scale solar power is most expensive. For a wind farm to be profitable, operators need two-to-four-times more revenue per megawatt hour than natural gas. That money could come from carbon off-sets (selling carbon “credits”), but most of it will come from government or consumer subsidy. In electricity generation circles, it’s being suggested the Notley government will subsidize renewable energy through the upcoming carbon tax.

In summation: Alberta can easily meet its carbon-reduction and environmental goals by transitioning from coal-powered to natural gas-fired power plants. We do not need ultra-expensive, large-scale renewables to meet those goals.

A reader recently chided me: “Having lived in Europe and being familiar with developments in places like Germany and Scandinavia,” she wrote, “it’s clear that our province is well behind the times.”

Behind the times?

Since when does producing cheap, clean, low-emission electricity from natural gas mean we are “behind the times”? Since when does using our own resources — natural gas and all that economic activity that comes from extracting and processing that resource — mean we are “behind the times?”

How does such political correctness defy the evidence in front of our noses? Moving to natural gas is central to the global carbon clean-up equation!

Let the European countries lay claim to being (high-cost) renewables experts. Let Alberta be known globally for its expertise in producing and using inexpensive, low-emission fossil fuels.

We can best save the world, not by switching to renewables, but by bringing our expertise in low-emission fossil fuels to China – which produces more GHG emissions in one day than will oilsands’ growth over the next 25 years.
http://www.edmontonsun.com/2016/07/14/h ... in-alberta

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Unread postPosted: July 18th, 2016, 8:11 pm 
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Energy self sufficiency, good paying jobs, low taxes, business investemt and low unemployment are overrated according to Nothead's New Debt Party.
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Since being elected in May of 2015, the New Democratic government of Alberta has done exactly as it said it would do.

With determination born of quasi-religious conviction, it has sturdily marched to the front lines of the global climate-change battle.

Never mind that Canada is not the culprit, that our carbon/methane emissions do not move the needle globally. This government has decreed that coal must go, gas is an ass and oil a necessary evil, to be tolerated until it can, in the distant future, finally be banned.

In a perfect New Democrat/Greenpeace world, all energy will be renewable, powered from running water, wind and sunlight. Albertans will magically maintain their post-carbon standard of living by growing organic vegetables, inventing and manufacturing alternative energy products.

Just one minor detail: These policies will effectively bankrupt Alberta. The looming new carbon tax, soon-to-come soaring electricity costs and the indifference to the decline of the once-mighty oil/gas/coal sector is about to suck enormous amounts of money out of the provincial economy. This government hasn’t the vaguest notion of how such economic activity – so vital to our well being - will be replaced.

Even worse: None of this needs to happen.

Alberta is a world leader in producing low-emission fossil fuels that will not harm the environment.

Carbon capture and storage is a reality. At the Shell Scotford refinery now, and at the Sturgeon Refinery once built, carbon produced from refinery operations is being collected, pressurized and transported by pipeline to deep, underground burial sites. The same process could be used for 100% carbon capture from ALL of Alberta’s coal, gas, oil refining, oilsands processing and petrochemical plants.

Building out a province-wide carbon-capture infrastructure will be expensive, but it’s a pittance compared to the economic consequences of a slow, steady decline in the production and processing of oil, gas and coal.

The wealth generation and job benefits of building and operating wind and solar energy projects in Alberta cannot possibly compensate for job losses in the oil, gas and coal industries.

The 958 wind turbines operating in the province in 2015 are nowhere near the critical mass needed for manufacturers to set up shop here

Wind farms create economic activity and jobs when they are being built, but, once operating, each wind farm needs no more than two or three operators. The number of turbines and wind farms could triple or quadruple as the price of electricity goes up, but all the components will still be imported and, once built, they will employ maybe 500 operators. Wind farms provide land-use rental income to rural land owners, and pay property taxes to municipalities.

Such benefits are a tiny fraction of the economic activity produced by oil, gas and coal. In the words of Robert Hornung, President of the Canadian Wind Energy Association: “Wind power cannot substitute for oil and gas in its economic impact.”

Solar panels on commercial and residential buildings have now reached the point – hurrah – of being cost-competitive with grid-supplied electricity. No subsidies are needed.

But nobody is making solar panels in Alberta, nobody is manufacturing solar components. In the current uncertain price environment, nobody is doing large-scale solar installations. The largest we have is a 20-acre solar farm on a Hutterite colony, producing two of the province’s 16,000 megawatt needs.

There’s activity on the “solutions” side – i.e. the business of importing, designing, installing and maintaining small-scale installations. “We’re in the very early days,” says solar expert Kyle Kasawski. “Investors can see solar energy coming. Some land assembly (for solar farms) and permitting is going on, but the investors are not ready to prioritize solar power in their portfolios.”

It’s all so much Alice-In-Wonderland logic.

The provincial government is plunging into billions of billions of dollars of debt just to deliver basic services, yet is committing billions more on the dubious economic proposition of renewable energy. At the same time we have endless amounts of clean-burning natural gas. We have the technology to capture all the carbon produced from the fossil-fuel engines that power our economy, i.e. the burning of coal, the processing of bitumen, the refining of oil.
http://www.edmontonsun.com/2016/07/08/h ... rgy-gamble

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Unread postPosted: July 18th, 2016, 8:37 pm 
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Thank you for reminding me how much worse our premier and her government are making our lives.
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Unread postPosted: October 31st, 2016, 5:15 pm 
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Unread postPosted: November 4th, 2016, 8:31 am 
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NDP policies responsible as Saskatchewan set to surpass Alberta in drilling activity.

With Saskatchewan set to overtake Alberta in oil and gas drilling activity next year, the NDP government must repeal its bad economic policies that are pushing investment and jobs out of the province, the Wildrose Official Opposition said today.

According to a forecast from the Petroleum Services Association of Canada, Saskatchewan will outperform Alberta in wells drilled in 2017. According to the story, Saskatchewan is providing a “more attractive environment for investors.”

Wildrose Leader Brian Jean said the NDP government's policies are doing more to incent job creation outside the province than in it.

“The NDP needs to recognize that many of its economic policies just aren’t working to create investment or jobs, and are only serving to create instability,” Jean said. “If the NDP is serious about kick-starting business and job growth, and getting us off this path to nowhere, it can start by immediately repealing some of its most damaging policies, particularly the carbon tax, which was never campaigned on.”

A Fraser Institute survey conducted last December found that among 126 worldwide energy jurisdictions, Alberta’s perception among oil and gas investors had fallen from 16 to 38.

“It’s troubling that despite our sound record on innovation, human rights and environmental protection, we’re losing our reputation as a top energy jurisdiction to do business in, even among our Canadian counterparts. What’s most troubling, however, is that these plummeting numbers represent jobs for families,” Wildrose Shadow Energy Minister Leela Aheer said. “This downward trend is unlikely to change unless the NDP shows some political will to get our province back on track.”

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Unread postPosted: November 13th, 2016, 4:35 pm 
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Unread postPosted: November 23rd, 2016, 4:51 pm 
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phpBB [video]

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Unread postPosted: November 23rd, 2016, 5:47 pm 

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Will the Keystone pipeline's construction help Notley at all, Herman?

Seems if the oil gets flowing again, it could be a room boom to Alberta, don't you think?

Regardless of whichever party is in.

Notley talks Green, but secretly she's probably cheering that Trump won.

Anyways, I said this in other posts - that a Republican administration might actually be better for the Canadian economy rather than worse. The prairie provinces are sure to benefit from it.

Herman wrote:
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Unread postPosted: November 23rd, 2016, 5:57 pm 
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JOE wrote:
Will the Keystone pipeline's construction help Notley at all, Herman?

Seems if the oil gets flowing again, it could be a room boom to Alberta, don't you think?

Regardless of whichever party is in.

Notley talks Green, but secretly she's probably cheering that Trump won.

Anyways, I said this in other posts - that a Republican administration might actually be better for the Canadian economy rather than worse. The prairie provinces are sure to benefit from it.

It will help, but they are going ahead with the most painful carbon tax in Canada. This is on top of higher taxes, fees, new regulations and and a carbon cap. Saskatchewan will have more oil wells punched than Alberta this winter. The best thing for Alberta will be a change in government. Brad Wall has been the best thing that ever happened to our resource industry, not high prices for commodities before 2014.

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Unread postPosted: February 15th, 2017, 8:03 pm 
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