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Unread postPosted: December 12th, 2019, 4:05 pm 
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Good riddance Scheer. Take Trudeau, Singh and May with you.

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Unread postPosted: December 13th, 2019, 1:35 pm 
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Conservative MP Erin O'Toole is the first out of the gate.

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Unread postPosted: December 14th, 2019, 9:47 am 
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While I did not support Andrew Scheer as a leader, at least he had the guts to seek leadership when the party itself knew they would not topple Trudeau.

Kudos due to Andrew Scheer

During the 2017 Conservative Party of Canada leadership race some of the presumed front-runners opted not to run. They felt, rumour had it, that there was no point, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau couldn’t be beat, he was going to get two terms or more, and so a few big names decided to sit it out.

Enter Andrew Scheer. He wasn’t a front-runner. In fact, the former speaker of the House of Commons was a relative unknown outside of the Ottawa bubble. But he scrapped it out in the leadership race and prevailed on the final ballot.

On Thursday morning, Scheer announced his planned resignation from the party as leader. This happened after a considerable effort on the part of some operatives to oust him. Grassroots members were divided, with some backing Scheer and others wanting him gone.

The idea of a mandated leadership review is a good one as it formalizes the process and takes some of the backstabbing out of the whole process. That was supposed to happen in April but now we’ll never know.

The Conservatives will soon embark on a leadership campaign with Scheer remaining as interim leader until that time. We will have more to say soon about the qualities and policy views we’d like to see in the next leader.

But first, it’s important Canadians take a moment to offer Andrew Scheer kudos. He was far from a total disaster. He won the popular vote, brought the Liberals down to a minority standing and improved his party’s seat count.

Scheer’s personal warmth did not translate well on camera, where he appeared wooden. His inability to answer straightforward questions about his views alienated voters.

He was right on important policy issues, though.

Canadian politics needs a leader who will speak out against the reckless carbon tax. It needs a leader who will argue the importance of fiscal responsibility. and it needs someone who will stand up to China, which we all know Trudeau isn’t doing. Scheer responsibly did all of these things.

Canadians who wanted a responsible voice to challenge Justin Trudeau were well-served by Scheer holding the

PM to account, both in the House of Commons and on the campaign trail.

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Unread postPosted: December 14th, 2019, 12:13 pm 

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I was a Bernier supporter. He is what the Conservatives need to offer Canadians an alternative to Trudeau. Ambrose, McKay, and Chong are Trudeau lite.

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Unread postPosted: December 15th, 2019, 11:35 am 
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I hope Michelle throws her hat in the ring.

CALGARY — Calgary Nosehill MP Michelle Rempel has broken her silence days after federal Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer said he would step down from his post, as news emerged of a party dispute over his use of party funds for his children’s private schooling.

In a thread posted on Twitter Saturday morning, Rempel said it was time for the party to look for “big, bold, visionary stuff.”

“Over the last few years, I feel like our party has been cowed into submission that somehow transactional politics are the only thing that we should be doing,” she said, “that big bold transformative ideas on the right are verboten simply by virtue of them not being Liberal.

“Partisanship works when (we) agree on policy outcome, but boldly and unapologetically offer alternative policy instruments to get there. Where my party has encountered issues is when we are perceived to ignore a public policy concern altogether.”

She continued by noting that while her tweets were “not an opening salvo to a leadership bid,” it was “an appeal to the core point” of a National Post editorial she shared. The editorial, published Friday afternoon, suggested the Conservative party focus on philosophy first before choosing a leader.

“So now is the time for ideas, and a big tough conversation about what we want to do for Canada. Let’s start there, and measure our candidates by that,” said Rempel in the closing tweet of the thread.

With the leadership seat vacant within the Conservative party, rumours and speculation have dominated the world of Canadian politics since Scheer announced his resignation Thursday. He will remain party leader until a successor is chosen.

Suggested among the many as potentials candidates to run for the leader’s post have been Rempel, former interim Conservative leader Rona Ambrose, former Stephen Harper cabinet minister Peter

Mackay and Ontario MP Erin O’toole, among others.

Mount Royal University political scientist Lori Williams said while she thinks a shakedown at the top was inevitable, the next leader of the party needs to be a leader who can bridge gaps.

“In spite of the fact their raw numbers went up, they lost seats in Quebec and

Ontario,” said Williams. “If they want to be a truly national party that is able to claim support and membership and participation across the country, they simply have to broaden their base.

“And in order to broaden their base, they’re going to have to find bridges across the things that divide many of the Conservatives.”

Noting that credible climate policy, or balancing energy and the environment could be ways to do so, Williams said they need to be done in a way that doesn’t further alienate Westerners.

And while suggestions have arisen a woman would be best to lead the Conservative base moving forward, Williams said ability is going to be key for the Tories.

“I think a lot of people are thinking that a strong female candidate for the leadership would be a good thing, because they could go up against Justin Trudeau probably more effectively in some ways, at least on issues, than some of the male candidates that are expressing interest,” she said.

“But it’s not just a matter of gender, it’s a matter of ability — and ability is not just how smart you are, but how experienced are you, how effective have you been in bridging some of the kinds of gaps that are plaguing the party right now. There, I think experience could make a big difference. Michelle Rempel is well respected and seen as a rising star in the Conservative party, but doesn’t have as much experience as, for example, Rona Ambrose does.”

Rempel did not respond to multiple requests for comment from Postmedia.

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Unread postPosted: December 15th, 2019, 11:40 am 
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One thing we can be sure of is that if outgoing Conservative leader Andrew Scheer had won the Oct. 21 election, we would never have heard about the Conservative party subsidizing the private school tuitions of his children.

It’s hardly unknown for political parties to use party funds to top up the salaries and/or defray the expenses of their leaders, although they don’t normally broadcast it to the public.

While party funding for such measures is partly subsidized by taxpayers because of the tax credit donors to registered political parties receive, it’s generally considered less controversial than having the money come from government revenues.

Consider, for example, the controversy that erupted when it was revealed Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s nannies were being paid out of the public purse — led by the Conservatives.

This story about Scheer only leaked because he has been damaged goods since the election, which his Conservative detractors believe he should have won easily given Trudeau’s political and personal scandals.

The problem is that in their efforts to undermine Scheer, his enemies have resorted to the old Conservative tactic of knifing their leader, and each other, in the stomach.

Which is great for Trudeau and the Liberals, who only have to stand back and watch while their main political opponents are burying themselves with a shovel.

In fact, Trudeau was far more gracious to Scheer than the Conservative party when Scheer announced he was stepping down as Conservative leader last week.

But not even that was enough to satisfy those Conservatives who were out for Scheer’s head.

After dancing on Scheer’s political corpse by boasting about their victory even as Scheer was announcing his resignation, they now want Scheer to resign immediately as party leader — even though the Conservative caucus voted unanimously to keep him on as interim leader until a successor is chosen.

The end result of all this is that both Scheer and the Conservative brand have been damaged, because Scheer portrayed himself as a middle-class family man who understands the financial stresses of ordinary Canadian families.

Except ordinary Canadians don’t get financial help from the Conservative Party to send their kids to private schools.

The Conservative Party looks bad because, having previously subsidized some of the expenses of past Conservative prime PMS like Stephen Harper (personal stylist) and Brian Mulroney (renovations to 24 Sussex Dr.), it hasn’t explained why it considers Scheer’s case to be substantially different.

(The Reform party, the forerunner of today’s Conservatives, gave party leader Preston Manning a clothing allowance.)

Finally, the Conservative party seems to be in organizational chaos.

Scheer’s political enemies leaked the story to the media that he had improperly used the party’s funds to pay for the tuition of his children.

But party executive director Dustin van Vugt responded that he (van Vugt) followed “the normal practice for political parties to reimburse some of the costs associated with being a national leader” and that “all proper procedures were followed and signed off on by the appropriate people.”

Subsequent to that, it appears, van Vugt was fired by the party amid reported complaints from directors of the Conservative Fund — from which the money allocated to pay for the tuition of Sheer’s children came — that they didn’t know about it.

Which raises the question of how was that possible? If the Conservatives can’t manage their own finances competently, what would they be like managing the finances of the government of Canada?

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A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


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Unread postPosted: December 15th, 2019, 11:48 am 
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Expect an issues-based Conservative leadership race this time around

It’s only natural that at the early stages of a leadership race the chatter and coverage is about the people who might be running. We’ve already seen a roll call of potential entrants for the Conservative leadership race to replace Andrew Scheer. For the most part, it’s a tally of the usual suspects — current and former prominent MPS who’ve shown some ambition in the past.

The question of “who?” is an important one, for the obvious reason that the entire point is to select someone. This time around though expect the questions of “what?” and “how?” to play a bigger role than in previous races. Questions like: What are the key issues Canada faces today? How will you grapple with those problems?

The world is in a state of flux now even more than it was two years ago. And many of the issues dominating the headlines are ones that directly affect Canada. They are also ones that desperately call out for leadership and new thinking, as they are files Trudeau has bungled.

The Conservative grassroots are policy hungry people. If you’ve ever been to a convention or big tent gathering like the Manning Conference, you’ll know that while Canadian conservatives engage in their fair share of palace intrigue that’s not the main draw for them. What gets them really into spirited debates is public policy. Ideas matter to this crowd.

It won’t be enough for leadership hopefuls to talk about their electability or how they can keep the party united all while steering away from provocative ideas, which is a classic front-runner strategy. Nor will it be enough to simply say they’re the right choice because they won’t be dogged by accusations of social conservatism like Andrew Scheer was, if only because the majority of the usual suspects are already long-standing supporters of same-sex marriage and don’t have a history of pro-life sentiment.

No, they’ll have to jump feet first into issues torn from the front pages — the very ones they’ll have to face if Trudeau’s minority government suddenly crumbles and they find themselves governing this great G7 nation. If they cannot chart a path on these issues, some of which border on existential threats to the country, then they do not deserve to win no matter how many other boxes they check off.

Here’s an overview of what will hopefully be top policy concerns for this race:

China

Foreign affairs were hardly discussed during the recent federal election, despite it being one of the few political issues that is the sole domain of the federal government. The most important one is managing the vice grip that China is trying to force upon our country. Even if we manage to secure the release of Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor, the rising authoritarian superpower will continue to push us around. Chinese influence is undermining our post-secondary institutions, their thugs are bullying Hong Kongers on our streets, they steal our intellectual property and their stateowned enterprises aspire to gobble up strategic assets here. The next Conservative leader will need a game plan to reset our relationship with the Communists in Beijing.

CLIMATE alarmism

There is something of a sea change beginning to happen in the climate conversation. Climate scientists are regularly stepping forward to call on the likes of Alexandria Ocasio-cortez to cool their rhetoric. They want moderation. They don’t want alarmism. The climate crowd has overshot and this spells opportunity for conservatives who rightly believe free market solutions are what will ultimately herald a green revolution. Top down authoritarian approaches to the environment — like carbon taxes — can soon be out of favour if Conservatives are brave enough to keep up the fight. There will be immense pressure for leadership hopefuls to cave on the issue and learn to love the carbon tax. Who will have the strength to prevail?

Energy

The

country

remains divided on the question of oil and gas expansion. That’s in large measure due to how poorly the issue has been framed. We listen to the likes of Greta Thunberg smack talk the natural resources we are blessed with, but fail to look at the big picture around the world. Top oil producers Venezuela and Saudi Arabia are unethical messes. And while we can’t manage to twin Trans Mountain, Russia is twinning their Nord Stream pipeline to Eastern Europe, which will see Putin hold even greater sway over the region. The likes of Thunberg are right only in that the energy question is indeed a moral one,

The Conservative grassroots are policy hungry people ... What gets them really into spirited debates is public policy. Ideas matter to this crowd.

The next Conservative leader will need a game plan to reset our relationship with the Communists in Beijing.

but they’ve got it all backwards. It is immoral to not expand our oil sands given the state of the world. The Conservatives need a leader who can rise to the occasion to change the narrative.

THE Opioid Crisis

The other day a well-known NDP politician told me she wants to see Canada Border Services Agency officials opening more crates from China to check for illicit fentanyl shipments. Maybe Conservatives have also called for that, but I’ve never heard it. Health Canada says 11 people a day die from opioid overdoses and the numbers are only increasing. While progressive harm reduction activists speak about this issue the most, it’s a non-partisan issue. If Donald Trump can lead on this issue, so can Canada’s next Conservative leader.

Please send me your thoughts on the issues you want conservatives to lead on this time around.

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Unread postPosted: December 15th, 2019, 2:41 pm 
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The problem with the Tories is that they aint offering an alternative to old Justine.

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Unread postPosted: December 15th, 2019, 4:12 pm 
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True. Their overall policy is not much different

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Unread postPosted: December 16th, 2019, 8:32 am 
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cc wrote:
True. Their overall policy is not much different

As has been mentioned before, we really don't much of a political spectrum in this country.


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Unread postPosted: December 16th, 2019, 9:32 am 
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cc wrote:
True. Their overall policy is not much different

What do you think of the PPC?


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Unread postPosted: December 16th, 2019, 10:48 am 
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Velvet wrote:
cc wrote:
True. Their overall policy is not much different

What do you think of the PPC?

They are a micro party.

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Unread postPosted: December 16th, 2019, 10:50 am 
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Yes. Not going anywhere .. at least not to date

Because of size alone I have not researched them

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Unread postPosted: December 16th, 2019, 11:03 am 
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cc wrote:
Yes. Not going anywhere .. at least not to date

Because of size alone I have not researched them

I supported Max when he sought the CPC leadership. I really like his stance on ag supply management.

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Unread postPosted: December 23rd, 2019, 10:08 am 
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By Melissa lantsman, a conservative strategist and media commentator. Most recently she served as Doug Ford’s war room director and spokesman during the 2018 Ontario provincial election campaign.

Only question for Conservatives is who can beat Trudeau?

Ever since conservative Party Leader Andrew Scheer announced his own departure last month, more attention has been granted to the wild speculation about who might replace him rather than why? or even, how?

Conservatives across the country have rightly, or wrongly, come to believe that in October’s election, Liberals snatched victory from the jaws of their own orchestrated near-defeat — and that defeat was easily avoidable. “If only we had the right leader ..." has been the general consensus among many disappointed by the results.

Party stalwarts didn’t jump at the chance to lead the opposition back in May 2017 when most believed it would be back-to-back majorities for a young PM Justin Trudeau.

Turns out, he was remarkably bad at being prime minister. and so, here we are, in a minority government with no one at the helm for the next kick at the can.

It’s not all bad news: This is a unique opportunity for conservatives in canada as they embark on picking the next leader. It’s an opportunity to actually choose someone who can win.

If they pick right, they’re likely crowning the next prime minister.

If they pick wrong, they’re back to the eternal squabble about the conservative “movement” politics — likely in a split party. This leadership election could go any number of ways: It could be a conversation that sparks aspirational change, a clear vision and platform to present conservative solutions to the issues conservatives ceded to the left.

It could be a divisive fight where candidates battle one another on a series of litmus test social issues only to render themselves unable to adapt to societal change.

It could be a nasty fight, pitting the east against the West to expose the fractures in the party — while pointing fingers at a PM that will be vindicated of his role in a national unity crisis echoed by his opponents.

With hundreds of other possible scenarios, this opportunity can be either be seized or squandered — perhaps as early as this summer.

at this juncture, in a modern conservative party looking for electoral relevance, one thing is clear:

The focus of anyone who takes over as leader will need to be party unity. For the membership however, the focus must be winnability.

It’s many other things, but at the top of the list: W-I-N-N-A-B-I-L-I-T-Y.

Who can beat Trudeau?

How badly? conservatives don’t often include it in their calculus of leadership choices.

They should.

The other guys do. Mostly. They shouldn’t shun this on the basis of principle or ideology.

I’ll let you in on a secret: The modern-day conservative Party of canada is not bound together by ideology. It’s bound together by the temperament of its supporters.

It’s not the ideological mantra of smaller government and conservative values that galvanizes a right-ofcentre voter coalition. It’s about understanding who they are and why they’re mad.

Leadership candidates will have to tap into a conservative temperament. driven by cynicism, skepticism and incensed with the imposition of the current government’s grandiose promises without their consent.

Understanding this, while presenting an ambitious, but cautious vision for canada — with a focus on solving the problems of today — is an immensely difficult task. but it can’t be easy to become prime minister.

and while it might be tempting to have a leadership election about the future of the conservative movement, people don’t elect movements — they elect parties and parties should focus on winnability.

This party is no different.

Who can beat Trudeau? That’s the question.

We can fight about the future of the movement later.

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Unread postPosted: January 3rd, 2020, 6:12 pm 
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The Tories will choose their next leader and hopefully Canada's next pm on June 27.

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Unread postPosted: January 5th, 2020, 6:24 pm 
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This is the year Canada looks for real leadership

https://torontosun.com/opinion/editoria ... WfhdwuHcfQ
The country’s former Prime Minister Stephen Harper left united, fiscally stable and respected on the world stage no longer exists.

We’re now divided not by two solitudes, but three.

This country is staring down the barrel of double-digit deficits with no hope of a return to balance. Our standing on the world stage has dramatically diminished. China is holding two innocent Canadians hostage – and our government does nothing.

Yes, it’s tough for Canada to flex its muscles against a rogue power. But if you let the biggest bully on the block kick sand in your face once, he’ll just keep coming back.

Leadership is about more than who gets the keys to the Challenger jet. It’s about making difficult decisions and speaking up for the human rights of your wrongfully imprisoned citizens. Instead of battling provincial premiers, it’s about finding common ground to work with them.

It’s about leading by example and inspiring by action, not posting platitudes and selfies on Twitter. It’s about substance over style.

Where’s the leader who can take speak up for this rudderless nation – and take us into 2020 with competence, courage and our heads held high?

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Unread postPosted: January 6th, 2020, 8:31 pm 
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Pierre Poilievre to announce Conservative leadership bid, Baird to chair campaign

OTTAWA–Pierre Poilievre is expected to formally announce his bid to lead the Conservative Party later this month and already has the backing of two party heavyweights.

The Star has learned that John Baird, who held senior cabinet roles in Stephen Harper’s government and at Queen’s Park, will chair Poilievre’s campaign.

Jenni Byrne, a veteran organizer who served as the Conservative’s 2015 campaign manager, will have also have a senior role in Poilievre’s campaign.

Neither Poilievre nor Baird responded to a request for comment Monday. But Byrne touted Poilievre’s backstory — born in Alberta, fluently bilingual, representing an Ontario riding — when asked about her involvement with his campaign.

Speaking to reporters in December, he delivered a campaign-style statement about who outgoing Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer’s replacement needs to be.

“We need someone who will stand up, fight back and win — stand up for our principles, fight back against the corrupt Liberal cabal, and win the next election,” Poilievre said — repeating the statement in both official languages — outside the House of Commons on Dec. 16.
https://www.thestar.com/politics/federa ... ZemEhRvcCE

Yes! PP all the way to 24 Sussex.

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Unread postPosted: January 9th, 2020, 6:53 pm 
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Peter McKay and Sarnia-Lambton MP, Marilyn Gladu have declared their intention to seek leadership of the federal Tory party.

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Unread postPosted: January 15th, 2020, 11:26 am 
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Peter McKay will announce today his candidacy for the federal Tory leadership. :negative:

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