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Unread postPosted: May 5th, 2019, 7:58 pm 
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Herman wrote:
Bricktop wrote:
Fashionista wrote:
Justin Trudeau looks down on people like me who disagree with most of his policies.


You must be a white supremacist, then.

:yuk:

Fash's racism sickens me. :laugh3:

Fashionista wrote:
cc wrote:
It's making me wonder if I'm a part of the "right" forum





ac_smile

:laugh:

:wink:

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Unread postPosted: May 5th, 2019, 8:47 pm 
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Herman wrote:
Bricktop wrote:
Fashionista wrote:
Justin Trudeau looks down on people like me who disagree with most of his policies.


You must be a white supremacist, then.

:yuk:

Fash's racism sickens me. :laugh3:

Not everybody is as open minded as you and I. ac_toofunny

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Unread postPosted: May 5th, 2019, 10:09 pm 
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ThugLife wrote:
Thats standard liberal policy, Fash.

They cannot support their own doctrine so seek to focus all attention on bashing yours instead

I wish I could vote in October's election, so I could vote Trudeau out.

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Unread postPosted: May 8th, 2019, 2:58 pm 

Joined: October 19th, 2012, 4:26 pm
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Gaon wrote:
ThugLife wrote:
Thats standard liberal policy, Fash.

They cannot support their own doctrine so seek to focus all attention on bashing yours instead

I wish I could vote in October's election, so I could vote Trudeau out.


I’m placing bets on a minority guv.

There’s currently too much division among today’s parties.

Even the Conservatives arent that solid.

Andrew Scheer appears to be the front runner but some of his support could slip away to his rival & the people’s party which could siphon enough votes away from him in Quebec to deny the Conservatives their majority


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Unread postPosted: May 8th, 2019, 4:47 pm 
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By Lorne Gunter of Sun News Media

What the Green byelection win means nationally

The results of Monday’s byelection in B.C.’S Nanaimo-ladysmith riding are, of course, good news for the Green Party.

Are they a sign of big things to come for the Greens in this fall’s federal election? Hard to say. But winning is always better than not winning, so the strong victory by Green Party candidate Paul Manly is a positive for Elizabeth May and her caucus of two.

Manly ran for the Greens in the Vancouver Island riding in the 2015 election and finished fourth despite outspending every other candidate.

In that contest, he increased the Green vote from 7% to nearly 20%. On Monday, he raised it to over 37%. So the Green vote is trending in the right direction for them.

But Monday’s results are a mixed bag for every other party.

They are kind of bad news for Andrew Scheer.

Despite three months of Liberal scandals, his Conservative Party couldn’t capitalize on Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s weakness. Nor did the Conservatives benefit from the NDP’S continued inability to attract voters fed up with the government.

The Nanaimo-ladysmith results were outright bad for NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh.

His party had the riding going into the byelection and couldn’t hold it. Left-wing discontent with the Liberals did not go automatically to the NDP as it has for four decades or more. Singh still fails to connect with left-of-centre voters truly ticked by Trudeau.

However, the Green win was really bad news for the Liberals and for Maxime Bernier’s new vanity vehicle, the People’s Party of Canada (PPC). Jennifer Clarke, the PPC candidate, finished a very distant fifth (she couldn’t see the finish line from where she ended up) with just 3% of the vote.

And Liberal Michelle Corfield finished fourth. Indeed, Corfield was closer to Bernier’s candidate in fifth than she was to the NDP candidate in third.

In 2015, the Liberals finished a strong second despite spending almost no money on their campaign.

That showed how strong Trudeau’s personal appeal was. Lots of otherwise mediocre Liberal candidates got caught up in the Trudeau whirlwind.

But there will be no whirlwind this fall. Monday’s outcome shows just how much Trudeau’s appeal has weakened.

In 2015, Nanaimo Liberal Tim Tessier earned nearly 17,000 votes and a second-place finish while riding on Trudeau’s “sunny ways” coattails.

Now, just three-anda-half years later, Liberal candidate Corfield won fewer than 4,500 votes. Even given the much lower turnout in the byelection, Corfield’s tally is an astonishing 53% drop for the Libs from 2015.

Nationally, the latest Angus Reid poll shows Trudeau with a 28% approval rating. For perspective, Donald Trump’s is 46%

Manly’s win for the Greens is also bad news for Alberta.

The new Nanaimo-ladysmith MP is devoutly antioil and zealously anti-pipeline. His presence in Ottawa is unlikely to move the meter much on energy industry issues. Despite doubling in size, the Green caucus is still not a recognized party and won’t have much influence over policy.

However, if the Liberals feel squeezed by the Greens on the left, the Grits might decide to go harder “green” on their own — increase eco-regulations, cancel Trans Mountain pipeline outright — just to stop the bleeding of their own support.

That could be very bad for the oil industry.

On top of all this tealeaf reading, though, it needs to be remembered that Vancouver Island often isn’t indicative of national trends, because outside Victoria the Island is contrarian and populist.

Most ridings have switched between NDP and Reform/ Alliance/conservative, not because of some deep leftright divide, but rather based on which party was considered the more “outsider” at the time.

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Unread postPosted: May 17th, 2019, 9:28 am 
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Andrew Scheer pledges to make Canada energy independent by 2030

Andrew Scheer pledges to make Canada energy independent by 2030

Canada’s opposition Conservatives, leading in the polls ahead of October elections, will seek to make the country oil independent within 10 years if they win power, the party’s leader said Thursday.

Andrew Scheer, the front-runner to unseat Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, said he’ll work toward that goal by creating a single corridor of energy infrastructure across the country that would simplify the construction of new pipelines.

Canada has enough oil “to put an end to all foreign oil imports once and for all,” Scheer said in a keynote address in Toronto, part of a string of planned speeches in coming weeks to roll out policy positions ahead of the vote. “An energy independent Canada would be a Canada firing on all cylinders.”
https://business.financialpost.com/comm ... nt-by-2030

Best election promise in the last few elections.

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Unread postPosted: May 17th, 2019, 12:57 pm 
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seoulbro wrote:
Andrew Scheer pledges to make Canada energy independent by 2030

Andrew Scheer pledges to make Canada energy independent by 2030

Canada’s opposition Conservatives, leading in the polls ahead of October elections, will seek to make the country oil independent within 10 years if they win power, the party’s leader said Thursday.

Andrew Scheer, the front-runner to unseat Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, said he’ll work toward that goal by creating a single corridor of energy infrastructure across the country that would simplify the construction of new pipelines.

Canada has enough oil “to put an end to all foreign oil imports once and for all,” Scheer said in a keynote address in Toronto, part of a string of planned speeches in coming weeks to roll out policy positions ahead of the vote. “An energy independent Canada would be a Canada firing on all cylinders.”
https://business.financialpost.com/comm ... nt-by-2030

Best election promise in the last few elections.

Why is this not the policy of every federal party. It is because the Rockefellers and Tom Steyer dictate their policies.

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Unread postPosted: May 18th, 2019, 8:52 am 
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seoulbro wrote:
Andrew Scheer pledges to make Canada energy independent by 2030

Andrew Scheer pledges to make Canada energy independent by 2030

Canada’s opposition Conservatives, leading in the polls ahead of October elections, will seek to make the country oil independent within 10 years if they win power, the party’s leader said Thursday.

Andrew Scheer, the front-runner to unseat Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, said he’ll work toward that goal by creating a single corridor of energy infrastructure across the country that would simplify the construction of new pipelines.

Canada has enough oil “to put an end to all foreign oil imports once and for all,” Scheer said in a keynote address in Toronto, part of a string of planned speeches in coming weeks to roll out policy positions ahead of the vote. “An energy independent Canada would be a Canada firing on all cylinders.”
https://business.financialpost.com/comm ... nt-by-2030

Best election promise in the last few elections.

I was in disbelief when I learned that this natural resource rich country imports oil from countries that use the proceeds to fund Islamic extremism. Why is Canada not supplying it's own petroleum needs and using the proceeds to build hospitals, and roads.

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Unread postPosted: May 19th, 2019, 9:21 am 
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Adam TAYLOR Taylor is president of Export Action Global, an international trade consultancy. Formerly, he was senior adviser to Canadian Minister of Foreign Affairs Lawrence Cannon and Canadian Minister of International Trade Ed Fast

Scheer’s back to basics sure beats Trudeau’s bungling

To sum up Andrew Scheer’s recent foreign policy speech in a sentence: Advance and protect Canadian interests abroad, stand proudly for the values Canadians hold dear, strengthen our relationships with traditional allies, and leave Mr. Dressup’s tickle trunk at home. After four year of Justin Trudeau’s “Canada is back” bungling, a back to basics approach is ironically refreshing

— and badly needed.

The old chestnut that the world needs more Canada was nice to hear 16 years ago when Bono first said it but we’ve really got to let it go. If only life were so simple. The fact is Canada prospered throughout the 20th century because we stood shoulderto-shoulder with our European and American allies fighting against tyranny and then built the international order: rule of law, business and trade, and democratic society. The 21st century is shaping up to be more of the same, and Andrew Scheer is right to tell it like it is.

The threats to our way of life are as pervasive as they’ve ever been. The dreams of idealists hoping for democracy in Russia and China have been dashed.

Peace in the Middle East has become a punchline — mostly due to the fact the Israelis don’t yet have a partner in Palestine that genuinely wants it. And state-sponsored terrorism in Iran and elsewhere preoccupies military and intelligence apparatuses around the world.

At the same time, our economic interests need to be defended, even from our closest allies who are now our fiercest economic competitors. We’re learning this lesson painfully in real time as the U.S. plays hardball with us on a variety of fronts.

The reality is that even though we line up with the Europeans, Americans and other allies around the world in battle, we’re trying to crush each other in the finite pursuit of investment dollars and government procurement contracts, and we’re always trying to one-up each other in trade deals.

The fact is, Canada isn’t back and not just because we never left. The Trudeau government has made many of Canada’s key strategic and economic relationships worse. Whether it’s the U.S., China, India or elsewhere, can anyone name a single bilateral relationship that is better off under the Trudeau government? Even in Europe, Canadian exports have barely moved an inch — a yearand-a-half into our free trade pact, and many technical barriers have effectively shut out Canadian companies. Suddenly, no one is interested in our Prime Minister’s socks.

So what will Andrew Scheer do? In short, he’ll do what Canada has always done and “reinvigorate Canada’s role in the alliances we share with our democratic allies.” By this he refers to NORAD, NATO, the Commonwealth, La Francophonie, the

Five Eyes as well as intensifying relationships with Japan and India.

On trade, Scheer points out the obvious flaw in how the Trudeau government misread the NAFTA modernization talks by trying to advance nice-to-haves (gender and Indigenous chapters, etc.) while our musthaves (protecting farmers, preserving dispute resolution provisions, etc.) were left to the 11th hour endgame trade-offs once months were wasted. Bringing a progressive trade agenda to the hard-nosed, trade deficitobsessed Trump team was akin to bringing pennies to a high-stakes poker game. While the new NAFTA wasn’t all bad, no one is calling it NAFTA 2.0. In fact, the Mexicans call it NAFTA 0.8.

But it’s easy to criticize Trudeau government, they’ve provided so much fodder. But to truly march Canada forward, action needs to be taken to reattract the foreign direct investment that has dried up, restore the market access we’ve lost for many of our agriculture products and advance Canada’s interests. If the Trump administration has taught us anything, it’s that we must reduce our overreliance on the U.S. market.

This will be the challenge any government will face. If we’ve learned anything over the past four years it’s that selfies, socks and Pr-obsessed governments are doomed to fail in today’s chaotic and highly competitive world.

If Scheer becomes PM and gets back to the basics as he promised to last week, it’ll be as good a place to start as any.

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Unread postPosted: May 19th, 2019, 4:51 pm 
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You can bet your last dollar that Scheer will have read the results of the Australian election and taken great heart from the result.

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Unread postPosted: June 5th, 2019, 10:32 am 
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Another good idea from the Tories.

TRADE ALLY
Andrew Scheer tells crowd Conservatives will negotiate to break inter-provincial barriers

Andrew Scheer is promising that a Conservative government would negotiate a deal to eliminate trade barriers among Canada’s provinces.

The Conservative leader made the commitment Tuesday in Edmonton as he outlined his vision for “a stronger and freer federation” — one that is more decentralized and respectful of provincial jurisdiction in contrast to what he labelled as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s divisive, arrogant, top-down, “my-way-or-the-highway federalism.”

If the Conservatives win the Oct. 21 federal election, Scheer said he’ll appoint an interprovincial-trade minister whose sole mandate would be negotiating a comprehensive, formal free-trade deal with the provinces.

And he said he’d convene a first-ministers’ meeting within 100 days devoted to that subject.

“I am not talking about a simple memorandum of understanding,” Scheer said during a speech at the Royal Glenora Club.

“The interprovincial free trade agreement will be a real free trade deal, like NAFTA, like CETA, like the TPP ... It will be a huge step forward, well beyond the current agreement.”

The previous Conservative government began negotiations with the provinces on what eventually became the Canadian Free Trade Agreement, which went into force in 2017. But Scheer said there’s nothing free about it since it includes 130 pages of exemptions and Trudeau “hasn’t lifted a finger to fix it.”

Trudeau last July appointed Dominic Leblanc to the post of intergovernmental affairs and internal trade minister, mandated specifically to fully exercise federal jurisdiction over trade and commerce to eliminate barriers, working in collaboration with the provinces.

Trudeau hosted a first ministers’ meeting last December that was supposed to focus primarily on internal trade, but he was forced by hostile premiers — notably Ontario’s Doug Ford, who is one of Scheer’s most ardent allies — to expand the agenda to include a host of other provincial priorities.

In the end, first ministers agreed to only a few modest steps towards freer interprovincial trade.

Scheer was introduced by his newest provincial ally, Alberta Premier Jason Kenney, for the fourth of five major policy speeches the federal leader is giving to set the stage for this fall’s election campaign.

He devoted much of his speech to lambasting Trudeau for imposing a carbon tax on provinces that refuse to put their own price on carbon emissions.

Scheer promised a Conservative government would provide strong leadership on matters within exclusive federal jurisdiction, where the national interest is at stake and where provinces disagree — such as on pipelines and the elimination of internal trade barriers.

He reiterated his plan to create a coast-to-coast, national energy corridor to move Quebec hydro electricity west and the West’s oil and gas east.

He acknowledged it would entail “a great deal of dialogue with provincial governments and Indigenous populations” and take “a lot of work.”

And in French, Scheer said it would not be done against the wishes of one or more provinces, which could well make it impossible to achieve.

Quebec Premier Francois Legault has categorically ruled out supporting a new pipeline through his province.

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Unread postPosted: June 6th, 2019, 8:59 am 
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We are really counting on the senate.

By Rick Bell of Sun News Media

TRUTH HURTS
Senators upset at report criticizing so-called tanker ban law


You have to like it.

Yes indeed, it’s a great day when someone rakes Justin Trudeau over the coals and gives him a piece of our pissed off minds.

It’s a downright swell day when someone delivers the straight goods, speaks our lingo without editing out the outrage and actually gets out the plain-speaking words to express what we feel about the treatment we get in today’s Ottawa.

Enter David Tkachuk, the man of the hour, a senator from Saskatchewan.

Tkachuk is number one on a committee in the Senate. The group voted not to proceed further with a law banning oil tanker traffic off the northern coast of B.C.

The senator pens a report explaining why the group voted the way they did.

Just so you know, the oil tanker ban is not dead.

Talk about speaking truth to power, Tkachuk unloads on Trudeau.

By landlocking prairie oil, it tells us we have “a lesser place” in Canada. It pits one region of the country against another. It inflames separatist sentiment.

The Trudeau government has chosen to target Alberta and Saskatchewan with a law “unambiguously harmful” to their economy.

The senator from Saskatchewan points to the Trudeau government intentionally harming the economic potential of one region. Us.

Tkachuk goes further saying the region being targeted is also where the Liberals have a tough time winning seats and polls show they won’t do well in the fall election.

He says the committee he chairs is worried by the “cynicism” of the Trudeau government targeting a region where the rewards for them are few “in order to please voters in other regions of Canada.”

“Regions where the government of the day has far greater potential to win seats.”

Tkachuk’s committee strongly finds “targeting one region of Canada for economic punishment is unconstitutional.”

There is more. It cannot fit into one column.

There are certain substances banned under the law. Diluted bitumen from the oilsands is on the list. Tkachuk says Team Trudeau offered no evidence diluted bitumen should be banned.

Here’s a zinger of a sentence.

“The development of this list appears to be completely arbitrary or worse, intentionally designed to damage the economy of western Canada.”

Tkachuk says the committee can only speculate diluted bitumen is banned “precisely because it is an important export commodity for Alberta’s oil sands.” Pow!

He isn’t done.

The senator says it’s appalling the federal Liberals think First Nations who like the Trudeau tanker ban deserve protection while other pro-pipeline First Nations “whose livelihoods who do not square with the ideological outlook of the Trudeau government” are out in the cold.

All said and done, he sums up Trudeau and company’s behaviour as abusive.

Right on cue, one senator from Quebec by the name of Andre Pratte doesn’t like the “partisan and excessive language” in Tkachuk’s report.

Quebec knows all about partisan and excessive language and so does Alberta. We’ve been paying to hear it for a very long time.

The senator lectures us on how the Senate should not be about “division” but should be about “negotiation and compromise.”

We’re not about division, pal. We’re getting the short end of the stick and paying a lot of the freight to other parts of the country who sometimes spit in our face.

And you’re talking negotiation and compromise.

Lookee here, someone called Julie Miville-dechene, a senator from … come on and guess … Quebec.

For this Quebec senator, Tkachuk is being “biased” and “one-sided” and used “inappropriate, unhealthy rhetoric.” Gimme a break.

Less lecturing and more effort to get oilsands product to the coast would be far more helpful than the usual condescending attitude from Trudeau’s Ottawa.

Naturally, Trudeau appointed both of these elected-by-nobody senators.

Up in Edmonton, Sonya Savage, Alberta’s energy minister and a real fighter for the oilpatch, isn’t buying all the senatorial whining about Tkachuk’s rhetoric being oh-so-inappropriate.

Let’s look at the real world, shall we?

Savage says the oil tanker ban “blatantly aims to suffocate Alberta’s main economic driver in an attempt to score ill-conceived political points threatening our national unity.” Bingo!

Savage hopes these bellyaching senators will be more concerned about the state of the economy and the state of the country than about Tkachuk’s writing style.

And the senator, who made this scribbler’s day, warns the Ottawa types you can feel the resentment out here and it’s best not to put more fuel on that fire.

Good advice. Because we’ve eaten enough crap.

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Unread postPosted: June 6th, 2019, 9:02 am 

Joined: October 19th, 2012, 4:26 pm
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Bricktop wrote:
You can bet your last dollar that Scheer will have read the results of the Australian election and taken great heart from the result.


He doesn’t have enough appeal to deliver a majority BT.

Canada will end up with a minority guv following the 2019 Canada election BT.


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Unread postPosted: June 11th, 2019, 2:22 pm 
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Expect climate change to be a big talking point in the campaign. All the parties will exploit forest fires and floods for political gain. They will all claim they can change the climate. They can't.
https://www.macleans.ca/opinion/andrew- ... -calculus/

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Unread postPosted: June 11th, 2019, 3:05 pm 
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seoulbro wrote:
Expect climate change to be a big talking point in the campaign. All the parties will exploit forest fires and floods for political gain. They will all claim they can change the climate. They can't.
https://www.macleans.ca/opinion/andrew- ... -calculus/


To a leftard--Climate change and racism are the causes of everything bad in the world.


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Unread postPosted: June 11th, 2019, 3:51 pm 
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And white males are the cause of climate change and racism.

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Unread postPosted: June 11th, 2019, 11:31 pm 
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seoulbro wrote:
Expect climate change to be a big talking point in the campaign. All the parties will exploit forest fires and floods for political gain. They will all claim they can change the climate. They can't.
https://www.macleans.ca/opinion/andrew- ... -calculus/


Scheer does not support a useless carbon cash grab, so the more proggy parties will label him a denier just like they are trying to paint the Pillsbury Dough Boy as a white nationalist. :crazy:

This country is losing it's democracy right along with it's middle class. Thanks progtards.

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 Post subject: Re: Misc. Politics
Unread postPosted: June 12th, 2019, 6:59 am 

Joined: October 4th, 2012, 10:25 pm
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seoulbro wrote:
@realAzhyaAryola wrote:
Obama was recently in Canada. He said that Fox News viewers have a different reality than New York Times readers. Do you agree?

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/b ... -1.5158658

Obama has a different reality. On second thought, he is just lying.

I expect the Liberals to be as dirty as the NDP were in Alberta's provincial election.


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Unread postPosted: June 12th, 2019, 1:28 pm 
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I am only putting this in the federal election thread because the spending freezes/moderate cuts Ford is proposing are having an impact on the polling numbers for October's election.

Ford’s critics have a double standard

The same people who said Premier Doug Ford is wasting taxpayers’ money by legally challenging Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s right to impose a carbon tax on Ontario should also be saying this.

That it’s a waste of taxpayers’ money for Mayor John Tory and Toronto council to challenge Ford’s right to downsize council from 47 seats to 25, as it did before last year’s municipal election.

In both cases, the Ontario and Toronto governments are, in the opinion of many legal experts, throwing Hail Mary passes in legal battles they will probably lose.

In the case of Ontario’s challenge of the federal carbon tax, the Saskatchewan government last month lost a similar appeal, with the Saskatchewan Court of Appeal — in a 3-2 decision — ruling Trudeau had the right to impose the tax.

Saskatchewan is appealing that decision to the Supreme Court of Canada, but the Court of Appeal verdict suggests provinces legally challenging Trudeau’s carbon tax, including Ontario, face an uphill battle.

In Toronto’s appeal of Ford’s legislation downsizing council, known as Bill 5, a three-judge panel of the Ontario Court of Appeal, previously stayed a favourable decision for the city by Superior Court Justice Edward Belobaba.

That allowed last year’s municipal election to go ahead with a 25-seat council.

In granting the stay, the Court of Appeal said, “we have concluded that there is a strong likelihood that (the) application judge erred in law and that the attorney general’s appeal to this court will succeed.”


In other words, three senior judges of Ontario’s highest court have already said the city will probably lose the legal case it is putting before the same court this week, the same argument Toronto’s lawyer made when she originally advised council it would likely lose its challenge of Ford’s Bill 5.

We side with the Ford government in both cases, but we also believe the city has as much right to legally challenge Ford’s law on downsizing council, as Ford has to challenge Trudeau’s carbon tax.

By contrast, those who claim Ford’s wasting public money on a hopeless legal challenge, while arguing Toronto’s legal challenge of Ford’s legislation is a legitimate use of public money, are talking out of both sides of their mouths.

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Unread postPosted: June 12th, 2019, 1:36 pm 
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Two-thirds of Canadians say carbon tax will affect their vote: Poll

Many Canadian voters are motivated on the issue of the carbon tax but not necessarily in a way that benefits Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

A new public opinion poll by Forum Research shows that Canadians are divided in support for the Liberal government’s carbon tax and that two thirds of them say it will affect how they vote this October. These results are hardly surprising given the mixed reactions to the controversial tax but what the numbers also reveal is how one side of the debate is much more passionate than the other.

The telephone poll of 1,633 Canadian voters found that 45% are opposed to the tax, 28% are in favour of it and 27% say they are neither for nor against it. This tells us that public opinion is more on the side of Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer, who is against the tax alongside premiers, such as Ontario’s Doug Ford and Alberta’s Jason Kenney.

It’s not just the raw numbers though that work to Scheer’s favour and against Trudeau’s much coveted tax. Forum also looked at how motivated voters are on the issue and found those opposed feel much more strongly than those in favour.

A majority of respondents, 65%, say the carbon tax will in some way influence their vote in October, with 40% saying it is “very likely” to affect their vote and 25% saying it’s “somewhat likely.” Those opposed to the carbon tax, though, are much more likely to vote based on this issue than those in support of it. That’s where things get really difficult for Trudeau and the Liberals.

Among those who say they oppose the carbon tax, 84% told Forum that it’s going to play a role in informing their vote. In contrast, only 53% of those who support the tax feel similarly passionate.

The Liberals also appear to be trailing when it comes to getting out their base on the issue. While 80% of Conservative supporters feel motivated on the issue (presumably in opposition to it), only 48% of Liberal voters are excited to vote based on their support of the tax.

“The carbon tax looks like it’s motivating its opponents in far greater numbers than its proponents,” said Lorne Bozinoff, president of Forum Research. “Additionally, Conservative supporters are far more opposed than Liberals are in favour. If the Conservatives can consolidate the opposition around this issue, and make it the focal point of the campaign, the Liberals’ re-election prospects are severely diminished.”

The poll, conducted from May 31 to June 2, shows that while the carbon tax battle may have lost the top news cycle spot for now, it certainly hasn’t left the minds of Canadian voters.
https://torontosun.com/news/national/tw ... ll-reveals

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