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Unread postPosted: July 8th, 2019, 7:38 am 
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I read about the trillion tree plan.

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Unread postPosted: July 8th, 2019, 1:10 pm 
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Gaon wrote:
Best way to fight climate change? Plant a trillion trees

This is by far — by thousands of times — the cheapest climate change solution, study co-author says

The most effective way to fight global warming is to plant lots of trees, a trillion of them, maybe more, according to a new study.

Swiss scientists also say that even with existing cities and farmland, there's enough space for new trees to cover nine million square kilometres, roughly the size of the United States.

The study calculated that over the decades, those new trees could suck up nearly 750 billion tonnes of heat-trapping carbon dioxide from the atmosphere — about as much carbon pollution as humans have spewed in the past 25 years.

Much of that benefit will come quickly because trees remove more carbon from the air when they are younger, the study authors said. The potential for removing the most carbon is in the tropics.

Canada has lots of room for trees
"This is by far — by thousands of times — the cheapest climate change solution" and the most effective, said study co-author Thomas Crowther, a climate change ecologist at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich.

Russia, the United States, Canada, Australia, Brazil and China have the most room for new trees, the report said.

Before his research, Crowther figured there were other more effective ways to fight climate change besides cutting emissions, such as people switching from eating meat to vegetarianism. But, he said, tree planting is far more effective because trees take so much carbon dioxide out of the air.

Thomas Lovejoy, a conservation biologist at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., who wasn't part of the study, called it "a good news story" because planting trees would also help stem the loss of biodiversity.

The researchers used Google Earth to see what areas could support more trees, while leaving room for people and crops. Lead author Jean-François Bastin estimated there's space for at least one trillion more trees, but it could be 1.5 trillion. That's on top of the three trillion trees now on Earth, according to earlier Crowther research.

The study's calculations make sense, said Chris Field, an environmental scientist at Stanford University in California who also wasn't part of the study.
https://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/tree ... -1.5201102

This makes more sense than taxing essentials.

I like it. The UN climate fund can pay Canada to plant trees.

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Unread postPosted: July 9th, 2019, 5:04 pm 

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seoulbro wrote:
Carbon dioxide catcher

Bill Gates is keeping a close eye on the field of carbon dioxide capture as well. Like next generation nuclear power and cow-free burgers, this emerging technology is likely to be one of our most effective weapons in the battle against climate change. Technologies that literally suck the greenhouse gas out of the air could make a real difference.

A number of carbon dioxide-catching plants are already open or slated to launch in the near future. They include Swiss firm Climeworks' facility, the first of its kind to extract the gas from the air and store it underground. Other facilities in Switzerland and the US will sell on the captured commodity to the drinks industry.

Gates predicts this to be widespread by 2024. I say Western countries will still milk taxpayers with carbon taxes and cash giveraways to useless wind and solar schemes.

So, in five years all the money we have spent on solar and wind subsidies will have been for nothing. We can keep everything as is and simply suck C02 out of the atmosphere.

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Unread postPosted: July 12th, 2019, 12:24 pm 
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Charging people more for basic necessities of life is the worst possible way to reduce carbon emissions. The money used is spent distorting energy markets making the cost of electricity in particular artificially expensive.

https://www.fraserinstitute.org/article ... -emissions

Instead of instituting economically-optimal climate policies, Canadian jurisdictions have turned their carbon taxes into cash grabs and used revenues to badly distort energy markets.

So what else could our governments do?

One alternative to carbon taxes might be to facilitate the use of natural gas (rather than wind and solar power) for both power generation and to replace diesel fuel and gasoline for Canadian transportation. As of 2015, transportation was estimated to be the second-highest source of GHG emissions, comprising 24 per cent of all Canadian emissions. Between 1990 and 2015, GHG emissions from the transportation sector grew by 42 per cent.

Gwyn Morgan, founding CEO of Encana, suggests that governments facilitate a shift to natural gas for gasoline and diesel-powered vehicles (Canada has a nearly limitless supply of natural gas, but we rarely drive on it). Other countries such as China, Iran, Argentina and others have far higher market share for natural gas transportation than we do. Morgan suggests the cost of natural gas is less than diesel/gasoline, and that by simply not taxing natural gas as governments do with diesel/gasoline, we could achieve massive emission reductions while simultaneously saving Canadians money. And Morgan also suggests converting gasoline-powered vehicles to natural gas would cut CO2 emissions by one-third.

Clearly, carbon taxes are only one approach to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. But history teaches that carbon taxes rapidly become cash grabs used to tinker with our energy economy by promoting types of power that drive up energy prices. With growing resistance to carbon taxes around the world, Canada is increasingly “going on its own” with a price others need not match. Creative alternatives, including the switch to natural gas transportation, is an alternative worth exploring.

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Unread postPosted: July 14th, 2019, 10:20 am 
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Herman wrote:
Charging people more for basic necessities of life is the worst possible way to reduce carbon emissions. The money used is spent distorting energy markets making the cost of electricity in particular artificially expensive.

https://www.fraserinstitute.org/article ... -emissions

Instead of instituting economically-optimal climate policies, Canadian jurisdictions have turned their carbon taxes into cash grabs and used revenues to badly distort energy markets.

So what else could our governments do?

One alternative to carbon taxes might be to facilitate the use of natural gas (rather than wind and solar power) for both power generation and to replace diesel fuel and gasoline for Canadian transportation. As of 2015, transportation was estimated to be the second-highest source of GHG emissions, comprising 24 per cent of all Canadian emissions. Between 1990 and 2015, GHG emissions from the transportation sector grew by 42 per cent.

Gwyn Morgan, founding CEO of Encana, suggests that governments facilitate a shift to natural gas for gasoline and diesel-powered vehicles (Canada has a nearly limitless supply of natural gas, but we rarely drive on it). Other countries such as China, Iran, Argentina and others have far higher market share for natural gas transportation than we do. Morgan suggests the cost of natural gas is less than diesel/gasoline, and that by simply not taxing natural gas as governments do with diesel/gasoline, we could achieve massive emission reductions while simultaneously saving Canadians money. And Morgan also suggests converting gasoline-powered vehicles to natural gas would cut CO2 emissions by one-third.

Clearly, carbon taxes are only one approach to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. But history teaches that carbon taxes rapidly become cash grabs used to tinker with our energy economy by promoting types of power that drive up energy prices. With growing resistance to carbon taxes around the world, Canada is increasingly “going on its own” with a price others need not match. Creative alternatives, including the switch to natural gas transportation, is an alternative worth exploring.

Switching vehicles to natural gas requires massive infrastructure changes across Canada. Propane was a failure. It is more practical to keep the nation's vehicle fleet and infrastructure and add something to the exhaust that either captures or dissipates C02 emissions.

But, I agree carbon taxes are a cash grab/wealth transfer. Particularly how it has been implemented in Canada.

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Unread postPosted: July 14th, 2019, 8:20 pm 
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seoulbro wrote:
Herman wrote:
Charging people more for basic necessities of life is the worst possible way to reduce carbon emissions. The money used is spent distorting energy markets making the cost of electricity in particular artificially expensive.

https://www.fraserinstitute.org/article ... -emissions

Instead of instituting economically-optimal climate policies, Canadian jurisdictions have turned their carbon taxes into cash grabs and used revenues to badly distort energy markets.

So what else could our governments do?

One alternative to carbon taxes might be to facilitate the use of natural gas (rather than wind and solar power) for both power generation and to replace diesel fuel and gasoline for Canadian transportation. As of 2015, transportation was estimated to be the second-highest source of GHG emissions, comprising 24 per cent of all Canadian emissions. Between 1990 and 2015, GHG emissions from the transportation sector grew by 42 per cent.

Gwyn Morgan, founding CEO of Encana, suggests that governments facilitate a shift to natural gas for gasoline and diesel-powered vehicles (Canada has a nearly limitless supply of natural gas, but we rarely drive on it). Other countries such as China, Iran, Argentina and others have far higher market share for natural gas transportation than we do. Morgan suggests the cost of natural gas is less than diesel/gasoline, and that by simply not taxing natural gas as governments do with diesel/gasoline, we could achieve massive emission reductions while simultaneously saving Canadians money. And Morgan also suggests converting gasoline-powered vehicles to natural gas would cut CO2 emissions by one-third.

Clearly, carbon taxes are only one approach to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. But history teaches that carbon taxes rapidly become cash grabs used to tinker with our energy economy by promoting types of power that drive up energy prices. With growing resistance to carbon taxes around the world, Canada is increasingly “going on its own” with a price others need not match. Creative alternatives, including the switch to natural gas transportation, is an alternative worth exploring.

Switching vehicles to natural gas requires massive infrastructure changes across Canada. Propane was a failure. It is more practical to keep the nation's vehicle fleet and infrastructure and add something to the exhaust that either captures or dissipates C02 emissions.

But, I agree carbon taxes are a cash grab/wealth transfer. Particularly how it has been implemented in Canada.

I know a switch to natural gas requires massive expensive changes.

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Unread postPosted: July 16th, 2019, 6:36 pm 
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I know this thread is about sensible ideas on climate change, but I did not want to start a new thread just for this. The EU is doubling down on expensive uselessness. The new EU boss wants to waste another 1.1 trillion Euros on what amounts to higher energy prices for average Europeans.

Von der Leyen Vows $1.1 Trillion Green Deal in Pitch to EU
https://ca.finance.yahoo.com/news/von-d ... 26374.html

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Unread postPosted: July 16th, 2019, 6:41 pm 
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"The Christian Democratic nominee directed her appeal to left-of-center members of the European Union’s legislature".

Another reason I'm glad we aren't part of the nuthouse...just another United Nations gabfest.

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Unread postPosted: July 16th, 2019, 6:57 pm 
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Bricktop wrote:
"The Christian Democratic nominee directed her appeal to left-of-center members of the European Union’s legislature".

Another reason I'm glad we aren't part of the nuthouse...just another United Nations gabfest.

It's why nationalism is growing in the EU.

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Unread postPosted: July 17th, 2019, 6:52 am 
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Herman wrote:
I know this thread is about sensible ideas on climate change, but I did not want to start a new thread just for this. The EU is doubling down on expensive uselessness. The new EU boss wants to waste another 1.1 trillion Euros on what amounts to higher energy prices for average Europeans.

Von der Leyen Vows $1.1 Trillion Green Deal in Pitch to EU
https://ca.finance.yahoo.com/news/von-d ... 26374.html

The EU bureaucracy is under the illusion the best plans for climate change must cost the people a lot of money. Simple and cheaper solutions are the most effective.

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Unread postPosted: July 30th, 2019, 1:31 pm 
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A viable electricity plan that requires no tax dollars, produces low C02 emissions(all energy produces some C02 emissions, including wind and solar), and utilizes the conditions brought about by Western Canada's oil and gas sector.

Geothermal project heating up
Company operating in Swan Hills hopes to use method to create electricity


A Calgary-based oil and gas company operating in Swan Hills could be among the first in Canada to use geothermal heat as a source of power.

Razor Energy is working to capture heat from hot water reservoirs on its site to turn into electricity. The company has teamed up with the University of Alberta’s department of earth and atmospheric sciences to research this new method.

Oilfield activity

Jonathan Banks, project lead with the university, said oilfield activity produces a lot of hot water by bringing geothermal energy to the surface through day-to-day operations.

“This has never been done anywhere at this scale,” Banks said. “This is a first of its kind in Canada for sure. Whether it will be the first geothermal installed power in Canada remains to be seen.”

Razor president Doug Bailey said if the company succeeds, the project will be economically viable and worthy of commercial investment.

“We’re very happy to see others getting into this industry, which we believe has a very strong and significant future but for us, we’re going to do right by our stakeholders,” he said. “If we don’t win the race, so to speak, so be it. It would be great if we were first but we’re not going to force that issue.”

Historically, geothermal energy has been limited to volcanic landscapes, where there is a lot of heat and hot water right below the surface, but Banks said the geothermal community is looking to expand into new areas that previously weren’t seen as economically viable.

He said the university plans to use the research to see if the same thing can be applied to other companies across the province.

‘Provincial opportunities’

“We’re looking at what works and what doesn’t work in their field, and then trying to extrapolate that across the entire province to see what the provincial opportunities are with this type of technology,” he said. “Hydrocarbon producers are starting to take their carbon footprint seriously. They (are starting) to look for very local solutions and I think we have one here in Alberta.”

The project is currently being constructed and is in the middle of final engineering. The project is designed to generate 21 megawatts of power from two sources. Around five megawatts will be produced from hot water heat and heat recovered from the battery site and an additional 15 will be from natural gas-fired generation.

Razor has received $7 million from the federal and provincial governments to fund the approximately $15 to $20 million project.

The timeline for the project includes a heat pilot in the summer, possible civil construction in the third quarter and potentially connecting to Alberta’s grid in the first quarter of 2020.

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Unread postPosted: October 29th, 2019, 7:23 pm 
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Renewable natural gas project plans expansion
Wood waste is converted into energy

An energy technology project that converts wood waste into renewable natural gas has been providing energy to edmonton homes and businesses for six months in a demonstration project, and now its ready to scale up.

“It’s a great relief (from) all this hard work and the close cooperation and support of all of our partners — it’s tremendous to have this out and running at this stage,” edson Ng, principal of G4 Insights Inc., the Vancouverbased company developing and commercializing the process to produce renewable natural gas.

The project has been 11 years in the making. “We’ve been chipping away for quite a while,” said Ng.

during the six-month demonstration project, G4

Insights converted forest residues into renewable natural gas and injected that gas directly into the natural gas distribution system operated by atco.

The company aims to expand it into a small commercial plant in three to five years, he said.

To be economically viable, the plant would need to process about 36 tonnes of wood waste per day, but to match the waste produced by a sawmill, that would need to ramp up to about 750 tonnes a day, Ng said.

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Unread postPosted: October 30th, 2019, 5:26 am 
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seoulbro wrote:
Renewable natural gas project plans expansion
Wood waste is converted into energy

An energy technology project that converts wood waste into renewable natural gas has been providing energy to edmonton homes and businesses for six months in a demonstration project, and now its ready to scale up.

“It’s a great relief (from) all this hard work and the close cooperation and support of all of our partners — it’s tremendous to have this out and running at this stage,” edson Ng, principal of G4 Insights Inc., the Vancouverbased company developing and commercializing the process to produce renewable natural gas.

The project has been 11 years in the making. “We’ve been chipping away for quite a while,” said Ng.

during the six-month demonstration project, G4

Insights converted forest residues into renewable natural gas and injected that gas directly into the natural gas distribution system operated by atco.

The company aims to expand it into a small commercial plant in three to five years, he said.

To be economically viable, the plant would need to process about 36 tonnes of wood waste per day, but to match the waste produced by a sawmill, that would need to ramp up to about 750 tonnes a day, Ng said.

Clever idea. But, progs won't like it if don't turn wood waste into solar panels and unicorn farts.

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Unread postPosted: October 31st, 2019, 8:55 am 
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Technology trumps taxation in the battle to do deal with climate change.

Mangrove Water Technologies uses carbon technology to turn waste products from oil and gas operations into valuable chemicals and by doing so, reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Carboncure, injects carbon dioxide into concrete to improve the process and performance of manufacturing.

The aim is to scale up across the concrete and construction industry and target 180 plants in Alberta and more than 1,100 plants across North America for commercial rollout by 2025. It's applications can be transferred to oilsands operations.

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Unread postPosted: November 2nd, 2019, 10:09 am 
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Colin Craig is the president of Secondstreet. org, a new Canadian think tank
Technology will address climate issues

In 1898, government bureaucrats gathered at the first urban planning conference in New York to discuss a very serious problem — the “Great Horse Manure Crisis.”

At the time, city streets around the world were full of horse and buggies transporting people and products all over the place. But those same streets also had a growing problem with horse manure, and in some cases, horse carcasses laying on the roads for days at a time. All this culminated in an influx of flies that spread typhoid fever and other diseases.

Urban planners at the New York conference never did solve this problem though. The issue was eventually addressed by technological change as cars replaced the horse and buggy.

Over 100 years later, governments around the world are once again sounding alarm bells, this time about a “climate emergency.” Greenhouse gas emissions are now in the cross-hairs of politicians across the political spectrum.

But just as we saw with the “Great Horse Manure Crisis,” it likely won’t be preachy politicians and bureaucrats that address the planet’s emissions, but rather technological change.

Note that society is currently addicted to oil and that doesn’t appear to be changing. The United States government just released analysis that estimates global oil and gas usage will increase at least until 2050. Other forecasts show similar growth patterns.

Oil demand is expected to grow not only for transportation purposes, but also for making products that are made with oil: plastics for our cell phones, children’s toys, aspirin, lipstick and bicycle tires to name a few.

Electric cars are one option to help reduce emissions (provided they don’t receive their power from coal power plants), and they’re starting to put a very small dent in vehicle sales, but mass adoption is likely quite far off.

What we have seen, however, are several companies coming forward with new technology to reduce emissions. Here are a few great Canadian examples:

Ontario-based Pond Technologies has created a system that diverts carbon dioxide from smokestacks into large tanks that have algae inside. The algae then consume the carbon dioxide that’s pumped into the tanks and multiply. Ultimately, the algae can be processed and used to produce everything from animal feed and nutraceuticals to bioplastics and fertilizer.

Ontario-based Berg Chilling Systems has also developed technology that’s quite innovative. Their equipment reduces the amount of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) that are burned at sites where oil and gas is extracted. Instead of oil companies burning methane and other gases when they extract oil and gas from the ground, Berg Chilling System’s equipment allows the companies to captures these gases and reduce their greenhouse gas emissions.

According to Berg’s site, just one of their units can reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 11,500 tons in a single year.

In the trucking world, companies such as Drivewyze have developed apps to help trucks with good safety track records bypass weigh stations. By skipping these stops, the trucks don’t have to sit and waste fuel while staff weigh their vehicle and review their records.

To be sure, these tools won’t address Canada’s emissions on their own, but Canadians should know that lots of local companies are busy working on technological solutions. Dire predictions about the end of the world are more horse manure than anything.

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Unread postPosted: November 2nd, 2019, 4:00 pm 
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Quote:
Ontario-based Pond Technologies has created a system that diverts carbon dioxide from smokestacks into large tanks that have algae inside. The algae then consume the carbon dioxide that’s pumped into the tanks and multiply. Ultimately, the algae can be processed and used to produce everything from animal feed and nutraceuticals to bioplastics and fertilizer.


I like this. A commercial use for C02. Works a lot better than another frickin tax.

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Unread postPosted: December 18th, 2019, 9:32 pm 
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Technology is reducing the land footprint of each oil and gas well drilled.

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/o ... ailsignout
For decades, the pumpjack has served as part of Alberta's identity, a symbol of its wealth and prosperity.

Still, the landscape in the province is beginning to change as fewer are needed to do the work they once did.

The oil producing equipment is not going extinct like the traditional grain elevator, but just as technology changed how agriculture companies built their terminals, innovation is altering the number, size and placement of pumpjacks.

For much of the last century, oil wells were similar to drilling a water well — they were vertical. That changed in the mid-2000s when companies discovered how to turn the drill bit and produce directional wells.

Technology continues to improve and as a result, oil wells are getting longer and longer. The average oil well drilled is now about three kilometres in length.

"The ability to steer a drill bit with the accuracy to hit the target the size of a bathtub that is seven thousand metres below the surface of the earth, I mean that's what we did," said Mark Salkeld, the past president of the Petroleum Services Association of Canada.

"We're drilling less but the wells are far more complex. They're longer, deeper and significantly more productive than the wells that we used to drill," he said.
Image

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Unread postPosted: December 18th, 2019, 9:36 pm 
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The number of new wells drilled has declined for several years because of innovation in the sector and also, in part, by the downturn in the sector over the last five years.

As a result, since 2015, more oil and gas wells in the province have been decommissioned, compared to new wells drilled. That means natural gas wells and oil pumpjacks are currently disappearing at a faster rate than new ones are created.

"Not only are we going to see the landscape start to clean up with respect to wells decommissioned and pumpjacks being taken away and land reclaimed, but the wells we will drill are fewer," said Salkeld.

"Driving down the highway to Lethbridge or Medicine Hat and seeing pumpjacks on the side of the highway — you can see that change."

In addition, instead of a few dozen pumpjacks spread across an area, in some newer developments they are placed side-by-side to reduce the number of pipelines needed.

Dan Hoffarth notices the evolution as he travels through parts of Texas. He's the chief executive of Calgary-based Citadel Drilling, which moved all of its rigs to the southern U.S. two years ago.

"You see pumpjacks everywhere on the horizon, but in the new areas, you just don't see that anymore," he said.

A new oil well can access more oil, Hoffarth said, than 20 wells could have reached previously.

"The technology has just advanced to such a degree," he said. "Your footprint is so small compared to what it used to be."

In addition, instead of a few dozen pumpjacks spread across an area, in some newer developments they are placed side-by-side to reduce the number of pipelines needed.

Dan Hoffarth notices the evolution as he travels through parts of Texas. He's the chief executive of Calgary-based Citadel Drilling, which moved all of its rigs to the southern U.S. two years ago.

"You see pumpjacks everywhere on the horizon, but in the new areas, you just don't see that anymore," he said.

A new oil well can access more oil, Hoffarth said, than 20 wells could have reached previously.

"The technology has just advanced to such a degree," he said. "Your footprint is so small compared to what it used to be."

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Unread postPosted: December 18th, 2019, 10:21 pm 
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Quote:
"The technology has just advanced to such a degree," he said. "Your footprint is so small compared to what it used to be."

That's what my husband has told me too Herman..

North Dakota's oil and gas is very busy, but with fewer and deeper wells drilled.


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Unread postPosted: December 30th, 2019, 12:18 pm 
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Forget wind and solar. They are old technologies that cannot meet the world's electricity and heating/cooling needs. There is also not enough land and rare earth metals for them.

We can take C02 out of the atmosphere right now without re-engineering our entire electrical and transportation systems.

New industry to suck carbon dioxide from atmosphere

Somewhere in west Texas, amid one of the most productive oilfields in the continent, a Canadian company is building a plant that it hopes will eventually suck from the air a million tonnes of carbon being pumped out of the ground all around it.

Carbon Engineering’s groundbreaking plant is one of many projects hoping to help in the fight against climate change by turning its main driver — carbon dioxide — into a useful product that can be profitably removed from the atmosphere.

“We’re pulling the CO2 back down,” CEO Steve Oldham said in a recent interview.

People in labs and boardrooms around the world are beginning to confront the realization that more needs to be done than cut emissions if the world is to remain livable. Vast amounts of carbon already in the atmosphere will have to be removed.

And that, says energy economist Mark Jaccard, is why companies such as Carbon Engineering are so important. Using CO2 to make marketable products will help pay for the massive scale-up of technology to remove CO2 and inject it permanently underground.

“You’re going to have to figure out some product you can make until humanity’s ready to use this for the real reason, which is to capture and bury carbon,” said Jaccard of the University of British Columbia.

Carbon Engineering is already pulling CO2 from the air and turning it into fuel at its pilot plant in Squamish, B.C. In Halifax, Carboncure Technologies is injecting CO2 into concrete.

Many companies already inject CO2 underground to force more oil to the surface -which, if done right, can result in carbon-negative oil. Other companies are using the gas to create useful chemicals, carbon nanotubes or plastics.

“There’s a number of technologies we’re trying to advance,” said Wes Jickling of the Canadian Oilsands Innovation

Alliance. The group is helping run the Carbon Xprize, a $20-million award for the best conversion of CO2 into a saleable product.

The market for such products has been estimated at $1 trillion a year.

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