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Unread postPosted: December 3rd, 2019, 4:59 pm 
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When your neighbors and friends were losing their jobs you didn't care and now that the UCP government is asking you to help your fellow Albertans you are wanting your neighbors to care about you..

It's time realize you have not been paying your fair share!

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Unread postPosted: December 3rd, 2019, 5:20 pm 
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Fashionista wrote:
When your neighbors and friends were losing their jobs you didn't care and now that the UCP government is asking you to help your fellow Albertans you are wanting your neighbors to care about you..

It's time realize you have not been paying your fair share!

Saskatchewan will return to a small surplus this year. The small cuts we made, have paid off. Stick to your guns Albertans. The reward will be paying down the NDP's deficit.

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Unread postPosted: December 3rd, 2019, 5:36 pm 
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Herman wrote:
Fashionista wrote:
When your neighbors and friends were losing their jobs you didn't care and now that the UCP government is asking you to help your fellow Albertans you are wanting your neighbors to care about you..

It's time realize you have not been paying your fair share!

Saskatchewan will return to a small surplus this year. The small cuts we made, have paid off. Stick to your guns Albertans. The reward will be paying down the NDP's deficit.

What's ironic is that it's not the government that has threatened to fire teachers and nurses..

It's AHS executives and ministry of education executives..

In fact, the health care budget actually increases by 201 million dollars this year.

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Unread postPosted: December 3rd, 2019, 6:11 pm 
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Fashionista wrote:
When your neighbors and friends were losing their jobs you didn't care and now that the UCP government is asking you to help your fellow Albertans you are wanting your neighbors to care about you..

It's time realize you have not been paying your fair share!

Truth. :thumbup:

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


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Unread postPosted: December 4th, 2019, 12:35 am 
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seoulbro wrote:
Fashionista wrote:
When your neighbors and friends were losing their jobs you didn't care and now that the UCP government is asking you to help your fellow Albertans you are wanting your neighbors to care about you..

It's time realize you have not been paying your fair share!

Truth. :thumbup:

The membership knew the days of raises above the rate of inflation couldn't continue, especially in a time of slow economic growth..

But, instead our AUPE leadership is asking for a 7.9 per cent increase.
:crazy:

Most positions that have to be eliminated should be education and health care executives, but they decide how where the cuts are to be made and they have decided their own highly paid jobs are more important than front line teachers and nurses.

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Unread postPosted: December 4th, 2019, 1:20 am 
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Alberta, like Ontario has a spoiled out of touch public sector union leadership. Neither province can afford it.

GOODBYE GRAVY TRAIN
NDP government kept public-sector workers insulated from Alberta’s economic realities

At the protests outside the UCP annual convention in Calgary over the weekend, one of the organizers insisted, “I hope (Premier Jason Kenney) realizes that it’s not a minority, it’s a huge majority that are against” his government’s budget cuts and wage rollbacks.

That organizer, teacher Stephanie Quesnel, needs to expand her circle of contacts. Instead of just speaking to other public-sector unionists, Quesnel might want to reach out to some rig workers or small business owners.

How about throwing in a welder or two, a framer, a roofer or carpenter?

Quesnel may only be hearing from people who are opposed to the UCP’S spending cuts of 2.8 per cent ($1.5 billion) over the next four years — out of a budget of more than $55 billion. But that’s because she’s not casting her net widely enough.

I’m sure the cuts seem big to public-sector workers losing their jobs or facing a two-percent wage rollback. But among private-sector workers who have seen their incomes slashed and their jobs eliminated in the past four years, I’m guessing the sentiment is, “Join the club.”

No layoffs

Under the NDP government for four years, the public-sector grew from 19 per cent of Alberta’s workforce to nearer 24 per cent. There were no layoffs. And wage increases kept coming.

Yes, technically, there was a wage freeze. But under the Notley government annual experience raises kept coming. And a lot of public workers who reached the 10-year maximum on their salary scale had their positions creatively renamed so they could continue to get raises on a new pay scale.

This summer, University of Calgary economist Trevor Tombe released a whole host of numbers showing just how good the public-sector had it (relative to the private sector) during Alberta’s long recession under the NDP.

According to Tombe (who is in no way a right-wing ideologue), in just the first two years of the NDP’S tenure, total incomes in Alberta fell by 20 per cent. Incomes of public-sector workers are included in that stat — yet their incomes didn’t fall at all under the Notley-ites. That means private-sector wages must have fallen initially by more than 20 per cent.


That drop in private-sector incomes sucked $75 billion — per year — out of Alberta’s economy.

There has since been some recovery. Still, when the NDP left office in April, private-sector income remained eight per cent below where it was when Notley was elected.

Two-percent cut

Remember, the UCP government is asking public-sector workers to take just a two-percent cut.

Under the NDP, a net 60,000 Albertans lost their jobs and didn’t get new ones — all of them in the private sector. And there are now 100,000 fewer Albertans working in jobs that pay more than $30 per hour, according to Tombe.

That’s a huge hit; one not shared by the public-sector workers marching around outside the UCP convention.

“Much of the decline in high-wage employment is concentrated in only a few sectors,” Tombe also explains, “construction (down more than 45,000 jobs), mining, oil and gas (down nearly 35,000), and professional services (down 18,000).”

What’s more, private-sector workers who are still employed have seen the amount they work drop by an average of two hours a week. That doesn’t sound like much, but those hours are typically overtime and overtime is the best-paid work.

That’s the equivalent of a drop of three to four hours of regular time a week. At $30 per hour over a year that’s upwards of $6,000. By comparison, a two-percent rollback for a teacher or nurse or civil servant making $80,000 a year works out to just $1,600.

The gravy train that public-sector workers enjoyed under the NDP couldn’t have continued. Nor could the wild, out-of-control spending on public services.

I think most Albertans know that and agree something had to be done.

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A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


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Unread postPosted: December 4th, 2019, 6:46 am 
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Joined: April 1st, 2016, 6:51 pm
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Fashionista wrote:
seoulbro wrote:
Fashionista wrote:
When your neighbors and friends were losing their jobs you didn't care and now that the UCP government is asking you to help your fellow Albertans you are wanting your neighbors to care about you..

It's time realize you have not been paying your fair share!

Truth. :thumbup:

The membership knew the days of raises above the rate of inflation couldn't continue, especially in a time of slow economic growth..

But, instead our AUPE leadership is asking for a 7.9 per cent increase.
:crazy:

Most positions that have to be eliminated should be education and health care executives, but they decide how where the cuts are to be made and they have decided their own highly paid jobs are more important than front line teachers and nurses.

If job losses have to hapoen make them in management.

_________________
“No issue better illustrates the divide between America’s working class and America’s political class than illegal immigration- Donald J. Trump.


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Unread postPosted: December 4th, 2019, 6:48 am 
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Fashionista wrote:
seoulbro wrote:
Fashionista wrote:
When your neighbors and friends were losing their jobs you didn't care and now that the UCP government is asking you to help your fellow Albertans you are wanting your neighbors to care about you..

It's time realize you have not been paying your fair share!

Truth. :thumbup:

The membership knew the days of raises above the rate of inflation couldn't continue, especially in a time of slow economic growth..

But, instead our AUPE leadership is asking for a 7.9 per cent increase.
:crazy:

Most positions that have to be eliminated should be education and health care executives, but they decide how where the cuts are to be made and they have decided their own highly paid jobs are more important than front line teachers and nurses.

Our union bosses don't represent the wishes of due paying members anymore either. They are corrupt as hell too.

_________________
“No issue better illustrates the divide between America’s working class and America’s political class than illegal immigration- Donald J. Trump.


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Unread postPosted: December 4th, 2019, 9:43 am 
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Joined: July 20th, 2015, 7:24 pm
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iron horse jockey wrote:
Fashionista wrote:
seoulbro wrote:
Fashionista wrote:
When your neighbors and friends were losing their jobs you didn't care and now that the UCP government is asking you to help your fellow Albertans you are wanting your neighbors to care about you..

It's time realize you have not been paying your fair share!

Truth. :thumbup:

The membership knew the days of raises above the rate of inflation couldn't continue, especially in a time of slow economic growth..

But, instead our AUPE leadership is asking for a 7.9 per cent increase.
:crazy:

Most positions that have to be eliminated should be education and health care executives, but they decide how where the cuts are to be made and they have decided their own highly paid jobs are more important than front line teachers and nurses.

If job losses have to hapoen make them in management.

The government should decide, not managers should decide who gets laid off.

_________________
prairie redneck.


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Unread postPosted: December 4th, 2019, 2:38 pm 
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Joined: October 13th, 2019, 6:54 pm
Posts: 1158
Herman wrote:
iron horse jockey wrote:
Fashionista wrote:
seoulbro wrote:
Fashionista wrote:
When your neighbors and friends were losing their jobs you didn't care and now that the UCP government is asking you to help your fellow Albertans you are wanting your neighbors to care about you..

It's time realize you have not been paying your fair share!

Truth. :thumbup:

The membership knew the days of raises above the rate of inflation couldn't continue, especially in a time of slow economic growth..

But, instead our AUPE leadership is asking for a 7.9 per cent increase.
:crazy:

Most positions that have to be eliminated should be education and health care executives, but they decide how where the cuts are to be made and they have decided their own highly paid jobs are more important than front line teachers and nurses.

If job losses have to hapoen make them in management.

The government should decide, not managers should decide who gets laid off.

I agree Herman.

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https://www.santasanonymous.ca/


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Unread postPosted: December 4th, 2019, 5:05 pm 
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Image

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prairie redneck.


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Unread postPosted: December 4th, 2019, 5:09 pm 
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Herman wrote:
Image

Alberta has been even more generous with our teachers.

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Unread postPosted: December 5th, 2019, 12:30 am 
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Fashionista wrote:
Herman wrote:
Image

Alberta has been even more generous with our teachers.

It's the power of the Ontario teachers federation. Their pension fund is the majority owner of the Toronto Maple Leafs.

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prairie redneck.


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Unread postPosted: December 5th, 2019, 2:55 am 
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Herman wrote:
Fashionista wrote:
Herman wrote:
Image

Alberta has been even more generous with our teachers.

It's the power of the Ontario teachers federation. Their pension fund is the majority owner of the Toronto Maple Leafs.

That is a big pension fund.

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Unread postPosted: December 5th, 2019, 5:58 am 
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Herman wrote:
Fashionista wrote:
Herman wrote:
Image

Alberta has been even more generous with our teachers.

It's the power of the Ontario teachers federation. Their pension fund is the majority owner of the Toronto Maple Leafs.

They have bought most of the media hysteria against Ford.

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A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


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Unread postPosted: December 5th, 2019, 8:18 am 
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seoulbro wrote:
Herman wrote:
Fashionista wrote:
Herman wrote:
Image

Alberta has been even more generous with our teachers.

It's the power of the Ontario teachers federation. Their pension fund is the majority owner of the Toronto Maple Leafs.

They have bought most of the media hysteria against Ford.

Ford is a man of the people.

_________________
“No issue better illustrates the divide between America’s working class and America’s political class than illegal immigration- Donald J. Trump.


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Unread postPosted: December 5th, 2019, 12:07 pm 
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iron horse jockey wrote:
seoulbro wrote:
Herman wrote:
Fashionista wrote:
Herman wrote:
Image

Alberta has been even more generous with our teachers.

It's the power of the Ontario teachers federation. Their pension fund is the majority owner of the Toronto Maple Leafs.

They have bought most of the media hysteria against Ford.

Ford is a man of the people.

He was left an unsustainable situation.

_________________
https://www.santasanonymous.ca/


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Unread postPosted: December 5th, 2019, 3:50 pm 
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Alberta's unions are partly responsible for this. The NDP spoiled them rotten.
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Unread postPosted: December 5th, 2019, 4:01 pm 
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he problem is not the nurses; the problem is AHS Executive, Management and poor management of expenses. AHS 2018-19 Alberta Health Services Annual Report actuals show that they have spent $8.322 Billion on Salaries & Benefits or 41% of their Budget. $2.762 Billion on Contracts with Health Service Providers or 14% of their Budget. $1.381 Billion on other Contracted Services or .07% of their Budget and an additional $18 Million on Contracts under the Health Care Protection Act. This totals to 61% of their entire 2018-2019 Budget.

AHS President and CEO Dr Verna Yiu made $676,000 plus an additional $49,000 in supplemental Pension Plan & Retirement Plan in 2018. 2019 numbers are not released yet obviously. To put that into prospective, The Prime Minister of Canada makes $357,800. A Member of Parliament (MP) makes $172,700. The Alberta Premier makes $186,170 after his 10% reduction (was $206,856). An Alberta MLA makes $120,931 after their 5% reduction (was $127,296).

17 of the top AHS Executives made $6,085,000 plus an additionally $366,000 for their Executive Supplemental Pension Plan and Supplemental Retirement Plan. There are 11 people that sit on the AHS Board that receive a total of $311,000 additionally to their normal incomes. That number is to rise to $334,000 for 2019. Then there is 77 Senior AHS Leadership Positions (EVP, SVP1, SVP2, VP1, VP2) that make a minimum of $146,000-$375,500 and that rises to a maximum of $264,000-$643,750. Compare that once again to what the Prime Minister of Canada, the Alberta Premier, Canadian MP’s and Alberta MLA’s make stated above. There are many claims regarding the ridiculous ratio of employee to managers. Some say 1 manager for every 5 employees and we’ve recently heard 1 to 3. Plus those managers have managers.

So now look at the proposal from the Province. The Province is suggesting a 2.8% reduction in wage. That equals to savings of $233,016,000/year or $932,064,000/4 years in just Salaries. Remember this is just AHS, not the entire Public Sector. If the average Nurse makes $75,000 Base (RN $68,700-$98,780 base salary), that means that savings equal the cost of 3,106 RN’s or even more if you include LPN. Alberta Nurses work an average of 26% Overtime as it stands right now. Of course Overtime means more costs to the overhead which doesn’t make sense on why not hire more staff. So why is AHS telling the Nurse’s Union that there will be potential layoffs? Of course it goes to the fact they are negotiating a new deal agreement between AHS, the United Nurses of Alberta, the Health Services Association of Alberta and the Alberta Union of Provincial Employees. The Nurses are just a bargaining pawn for AHS and that’s really unfortunately for them.

The Unions are asking for 7-8% increase. Let’s do the math; an 8% increase would equal an additional $665,760,000/year or $2.663 Billion/4 years in Salaries just to Health Care, not counting the other Public Sectors. Some Union agreements have clauses written in them that if 1 other Union gets a raise, they get a raise automatically to match as well. So imagine the ripple effect that this could cause for the Alberta Government and Alberta Taxpayers!!

Now remember that Alberta’s escalating deficits created a serious financial situation and a debt burden that has reached $62.7 billion for taxpayers and future generations of taxpayers. Debt servicing costs at the end of last year approached $2 billion (3% of Provincial Budget). Alberta spent more on interest payments to Banks & Bond Holders than on 17 out of 21 Government Ministries, including Justice and Solicitor General, Children’s Services, and Seniors and Housing.

See this isn’t about Nurses or Front Line workers and how important they are. AHS is deflecting the focus from their Executive and their inability to run efficiently. It’s about saving money in the next few years to get rid of the ridiculous $2 Billion going to Banks and Bond Holders when it should be going to Albertans and their needs!!!!! I for one cannot wait till the Ernst & Young comprehensive review is released in 2020. I can’t wait to hear what AHS has to say to defend their actions, out of control spending, mismanagement of expenses and their poor ability to run efficiently.

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Unread postPosted: December 11th, 2019, 10:31 am 
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Proponents of deficit spending falsely claim any cuts leads to recession. But, history tells us the opposite is true.

By Ben Eisen, senior fellow with the Fraser's Prosperity Initiative.

Spending reductions in the 1990s dwarf Kenney’s budget plans

The Kenney government’s first budget, tabled in the fall, has attracted more attention and commentary than most provincial budgets.

Critics predict harmful economic effects due to the planned spending reductions in what they call an “austerity budget.”

But a brief review of Canada’s recent fiscal past provides some valuable historical context.

First, let’s look at Kenney’s spending plan.

The first Kenney budget calls for program spending (all operating expenditures excluding government debt interest) reductions totalling 1.6% over four years, before eliminating the budget deficit and reaching a small surplus in 2022-23.

This is indeed a departure from recent spending activity in Edmonton where nominal program spending has increased over the past four years and large deficits have persisted.

So the budget does mark a change in course.

A longer historical perspective, however, suggests the spending reductions in the budget are mild compared to past deficit-elimination efforts, particularly during the 1990s.

Let’s start with Alberta’s own history.

During the 1990s, Premier Ralph Klein’s government reduced program spending by 21.6% over three years — that’s right, 21.6%.

These reductions quickly eliminated a deficit far larger than Alberta faces today.

And spending reductions in the 1990s were not the exclusive purview of Conservative governments.

In Ottawa, Jean Chrétien’s Liberal government reduced program spending by 9.7% over two years, as spelled out in the 1995 budget, which called for a comprehensive program review with the explicit goal of reducing and prioritizing spending.

Chrétien eliminated the deficit by 1997 and the federal government maintained a decade of uninterrupted balanced budgets while delivering pro-growth tax relief.

Finally, the ’90s NDP government of Roy Romanow in Saskatchewan reduced spending by 11.1% over three years, eliminating a substantial deficit.

This reduction in spending helped bring the province back from the brink of insolvency and laid the foundation for a lengthy period of prosperity.

These examples show there’s nothing unprecedented about the spending reductions planned for Alberta.

In fact, the Kenney government’s plan — to eliminate a smaller deficit over a longer time horizon (again, four years) by reducing spending by 1.6% — is mild compared to the Klein, Chretien and Romanow plans.

During the 1990s, opponents of these plans warned (as some do today in Alberta) that the spending reductions would trigger a recession.

But in reality, all three jurisdictions prospered in subsequent years.

Ultimately, “austerity” is in the eye of the beholder, and debates about whether it should be applied to Alberta’s recent budget boil down to semantics.

A better approach is to look at similar or larger spending reductions from the past and analyze what happened when they were implemented.

Clearly, when compared to recent plans by other governments in Alberta and across Canada, the Kenney government’s planned spending reductions are markedly mild.

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A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


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