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Unread postPosted: November 17th, 2019, 8:53 am 
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We have seen a complete reversal of fortunes between Canada and the US since Trudeau replaced Harper and Trump replaced Obama.

By Lorne Gunter of Sun News Media

The latest numbers on economic productivity in Canada are extremely disappointing. And with the Liberals back in power, the numbers are about to get worse, especially considering that the Trudeau government is now held in office by three anti-development parties — the NDP, Greens and Bloc Quebecois.

Even our “have” provinces fall far behind the top American states. And Canada’s poorest — the three Maritime provinces — are at or below the lowest state, Mississippi.

According to work done by Trevor Tombe, a University of Calgary economist, Alberta is Canada’s wealthiest province with a per capita GDP of $64,000 US. Yet that is behind 16 American states. Indeed, Alberta is a full 25% below the richest American jurisdiction— New York state at $86,000.

Perhaps more concerning, though, is the plight of Ontario. Once the economic engine of the country and home to 40% of our national population, Ontario’s annual, per capita GDP is just $48,000 US. That’s only $1,000 better than Kentucky and just 12% above West Virginia — coal-mining, mountain-people West Virginia!

Ontario is producing only slightly more than half the per capital GDP of New York. Indeed, our heartland is closer to Mississippi than to California, Washington state, Alaska and North Dakota.

This is largely the result of the Liberals “green” obsession — first in Ontario under premiers Dalton Mcguinty and Kathleen Wynne and now federally under Justin Trudeau.

This should surprise no one since many of the same people who thought up Ontario’s “green” energy strategy are now devising federal policy.

And it matters far less to these eco-zealots what happens to people’s jobs and standard of living than making expensive, symbolic, useless environmental gestures.

For instance, Ontario Liberal policies gave that province the highest electricity costs on the continent, which contributed to the loss of 200,000 manufacturing jobs in the past 15 years. That should make the architects of Ontario’s “green” energy policies contrite and apologetic. Instead, they are now trying to duplicate their disaster on a national scale.

Instead of trying to revive our economy with more pipelines and manufacturing plants, attracted by loosened regulations and lower taxes, the Liberals in Ottawa are giving every indication of going the opposite direction — more “green” impediments to growth, plus even higher taxes and bigger deficits.

Consider that half a dozen years ago, Alberta was one of the top 5 jurisdictions in North America for attractiveness to international oil and gas investors. Now, thanks to the Liberal-government’s WWGD (What Would Greta Do?) mentality, Alberta is 16 out of 20 according to the latest survey by Vancouver’s Fraser Institute.

Since the Liberals came to office in 2015, over $100 billion in energy-sector investment has been lost.

And the decline of our energy sector is not geological, it’s political. The oil is there. We know how to extract it. Yet thanks to our “green” federal government, there is inadequate ability to get that oil to market, so investors now see Canada as one of the least reliable places to put their money.

And the indications are the Trudeau Liberals will be even more anti-oil in their second term. They wouldn’t stand up to the B.C. provincial NDP’S obstructionism on Trans Mountain during their first term. What do you think the chances are they will stand up to the Bloc (or Greens or NDP) this term, when they need those parties’ votes in the Commons and they hope to steal their voters in the next election?

On Thursday, the Montreal Economic Institute estimated that interprovincial trade barriers cost the national economy between $50 billion and $130 billion a year. That’s between $1,400 and $3,700 per person.

Will the Trudeau government then try to solve its economic and fiscal problems by, among other things, breaking down internal trade barriers and unleashing the oil industry? Unlikely. Quebec is the most protectionist of the provinces and the most antioil.

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


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Unread postPosted: November 17th, 2019, 9:04 am 
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We are such hypocrites too in our green zeal.

By Lorrie Goldstein of Sun News Media

Quebec gets most of its oil, 53%, from Western Canada, which the last time we checked included Alberta, compared with about 40% from the U.S. and 6% from Algeria.

A Leger poll last December found most Quebecers, 66%, approved of importing oil from

Western Canada, compared with 7% who preferred the U.S., 3% Algeria and 1% each for Nigeria and the Mideast. Despite Quebec’s pipeline-hating politicians,

45% of

Quebecers said it’s the safest method of transporting oil, compared with 14% for tanker trucks, 13% for trains and 9% for oil tankers.

Quebec politicians like Blanchet and Premier Francois Legault, another oil hater, also ignore the environmental damage caused by their province’s major energy source — hydroelectric power.

As MIT earth sciences professor Bradford H. Hager, writing in Maine’s Portland Press Herald this year, explained: “International Hydropower Association data show that Hydro-quebec electricity is just about as dirty as hydropower gets. Why? When Hydro-quebec dams rivers on northern Quebec’s relatively flat terrain, it floods vast areas of forests and wetlands under shallow water.

“The amount of power Hydro-quebec produces per acre flooded is among the lowest of any hydropower in the world. The trees, bogs and soils Hydro-quebec floods have been storing carbon since the last Ice Age. When flooded, this stored carbon decomposes, releasing CO2

and methane.

“To make things worse, drowned trees are gone forever and cannot grow back to remove CO2 in the future.”

While Hydro-quebec boasts about its emissions-free electricity generation, it acknowledges that greenhouse gas emissions “generated by creating reservoirs used to produce electricity are not considered when calculating emissions or Hydro-quebec’s carbon footprint. As indicated in the National Inventory Report: Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks in Canada, Environment Canada considers such emissions to be related to a land-use change.”

In other words, what you emit depends on what you measure.

Quebec has the lowest greenhouse gas emissions per capita of any Canadian province but that’s an accident of geography — the province’s main energy source is hydro power, as opposed to Alberta’s, which is oil.

It has nothing to do with the environmental morality of Quebec politicians, especially since Quebec’s low electricity rates — about which they also boast — encourage the wasteful use of electricity as opposed to conservation.

But Quebec politicians aren’t the only hypocrites on this issue.

British Columbia’s virtue-signalling politicians do the same thing in trashing Alberta’s oil and its need for pipelines to get it to global markets.

This while Vancouver is North America’s largest exporter of coal — the dirtiest fossil fuel — and B.C. is building a huge plant to liquefy natural gas (another fossil fuel) for sale to global markets, which includes a 670-km pipeline.

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A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


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Unread postPosted: November 17th, 2019, 11:55 am 
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Our green obsession seems to be all pain and no gain..

We raise costs for families, send good jobs overseas, but all our sacrifices do have any impact on a changing climate..

There has to be smarter way.

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Unread postPosted: November 17th, 2019, 12:32 pm 
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seoulbro wrote:
We have seen a complete reversal of fortunes between Canada and the US since Trudeau replaced Harper and Trump replaced Obama.

By Lorne Gunter of Sun News Media

The latest numbers on economic productivity in Canada are extremely disappointing. And with the Liberals back in power, the numbers are about to get worse, especially considering that the Trudeau government is now held in office by three anti-development parties — the NDP, Greens and Bloc Quebecois.

Even our “have” provinces fall far behind the top American states. And Canada’s poorest — the three Maritime provinces — are at or below the lowest state, Mississippi.

According to work done by Trevor Tombe, a University of Calgary economist, Alberta is Canada’s wealthiest province with a per capita GDP of $64,000 US. Yet that is behind 16 American states. Indeed, Alberta is a full 25% below the richest American jurisdiction— New York state at $86,000.

Perhaps more concerning, though, is the plight of Ontario. Once the economic engine of the country and home to 40% of our national population, Ontario’s annual, per capita GDP is just $48,000 US. That’s only $1,000 better than Kentucky and just 12% above West Virginia — coal-mining, mountain-people West Virginia!

Ontario is producing only slightly more than half the per capital GDP of New York. Indeed, our heartland is closer to Mississippi than to California, Washington state, Alaska and North Dakota.

This is largely the result of the Liberals “green” obsession — first in Ontario under premiers Dalton Mcguinty and Kathleen Wynne and now federally under Justin Trudeau.

This should surprise no one since many of the same people who thought up Ontario’s “green” energy strategy are now devising federal policy.

And it matters far less to these eco-zealots what happens to people’s jobs and standard of living than making expensive, symbolic, useless environmental gestures.

For instance, Ontario Liberal policies gave that province the highest electricity costs on the continent, which contributed to the loss of 200,000 manufacturing jobs in the past 15 years. That should make the architects of Ontario’s “green” energy policies contrite and apologetic. Instead, they are now trying to duplicate their disaster on a national scale.

Instead of trying to revive our economy with more pipelines and manufacturing plants, attracted by loosened regulations and lower taxes, the Liberals in Ottawa are giving every indication of going the opposite direction — more “green” impediments to growth, plus even higher taxes and bigger deficits.

Consider that half a dozen years ago, Alberta was one of the top 5 jurisdictions in North America for attractiveness to international oil and gas investors. Now, thanks to the Liberal-government’s WWGD (What Would Greta Do?) mentality, Alberta is 16 out of 20 according to the latest survey by Vancouver’s Fraser Institute.

Since the Liberals came to office in 2015, over $100 billion in energy-sector investment has been lost.

And the decline of our energy sector is not geological, it’s political. The oil is there. We know how to extract it. Yet thanks to our “green” federal government, there is inadequate ability to get that oil to market, so investors now see Canada as one of the least reliable places to put their money.

And the indications are the Trudeau Liberals will be even more anti-oil in their second term. They wouldn’t stand up to the B.C. provincial NDP’S obstructionism on Trans Mountain during their first term. What do you think the chances are they will stand up to the Bloc (or Greens or NDP) this term, when they need those parties’ votes in the Commons and they hope to steal their voters in the next election?

On Thursday, the Montreal Economic Institute estimated that interprovincial trade barriers cost the national economy between $50 billion and $130 billion a year. That’s between $1,400 and $3,700 per person.

Will the Trudeau government then try to solve its economic and fiscal problems by, among other things, breaking down internal trade barriers and unleashing the oil industry? Unlikely. Quebec is the most protectionist of the provinces and the most antioil.

In the city I live in green surcharges and regulations have forced the middle class out. And what does it matter if this city becomes carbon neutral. It won't make any difference.

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Unread postPosted: November 17th, 2019, 2:08 pm 
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Joined: July 20th, 2015, 7:24 pm
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seoulbro wrote:
We have seen a complete reversal of fortunes between Canada and the US since Trudeau replaced Harper and Trump replaced Obama.

By Lorne Gunter of Sun News Media

The latest numbers on economic productivity in Canada are extremely disappointing. And with the Liberals back in power, the numbers are about to get worse, especially considering that the Trudeau government is now held in office by three anti-development parties — the NDP, Greens and Bloc Quebecois.

Even our “have” provinces fall far behind the top American states. And Canada’s poorest — the three Maritime provinces — are at or below the lowest state, Mississippi.

According to work done by Trevor Tombe, a University of Calgary economist, Alberta is Canada’s wealthiest province with a per capita GDP of $64,000 US. Yet that is behind 16 American states. Indeed, Alberta is a full 25% below the richest American jurisdiction— New York state at $86,000.

Perhaps more concerning, though, is the plight of Ontario. Once the economic engine of the country and home to 40% of our national population, Ontario’s annual, per capita GDP is just $48,000 US. That’s only $1,000 better than Kentucky and just 12% above West Virginia — coal-mining, mountain-people West Virginia!

Ontario is producing only slightly more than half the per capital GDP of New York. Indeed, our heartland is closer to Mississippi than to California, Washington state, Alaska and North Dakota.

This is largely the result of the Liberals “green” obsession — first in Ontario under premiers Dalton Mcguinty and Kathleen Wynne and now federally under Justin Trudeau.

This should surprise no one since many of the same people who thought up Ontario’s “green” energy strategy are now devising federal policy.

And it matters far less to these eco-zealots what happens to people’s jobs and standard of living than making expensive, symbolic, useless environmental gestures.

For instance, Ontario Liberal policies gave that province the highest electricity costs on the continent, which contributed to the loss of 200,000 manufacturing jobs in the past 15 years. That should make the architects of Ontario’s “green” energy policies contrite and apologetic. Instead, they are now trying to duplicate their disaster on a national scale.

Instead of trying to revive our economy with more pipelines and manufacturing plants, attracted by loosened regulations and lower taxes, the Liberals in Ottawa are giving every indication of going the opposite direction — more “green” impediments to growth, plus even higher taxes and bigger deficits.

Consider that half a dozen years ago, Alberta was one of the top 5 jurisdictions in North America for attractiveness to international oil and gas investors. Now, thanks to the Liberal-government’s WWGD (What Would Greta Do?) mentality, Alberta is 16 out of 20 according to the latest survey by Vancouver’s Fraser Institute.

Since the Liberals came to office in 2015, over $100 billion in energy-sector investment has been lost.

And the decline of our energy sector is not geological, it’s political. The oil is there. We know how to extract it. Yet thanks to our “green” federal government, there is inadequate ability to get that oil to market, so investors now see Canada as one of the least reliable places to put their money.

And the indications are the Trudeau Liberals will be even more anti-oil in their second term. They wouldn’t stand up to the B.C. provincial NDP’S obstructionism on Trans Mountain during their first term. What do you think the chances are they will stand up to the Bloc (or Greens or NDP) this term, when they need those parties’ votes in the Commons and they hope to steal their voters in the next election?

On Thursday, the Montreal Economic Institute estimated that interprovincial trade barriers cost the national economy between $50 billion and $130 billion a year. That’s between $1,400 and $3,700 per person.

Will the Trudeau government then try to solve its economic and fiscal problems by, among other things, breaking down internal trade barriers and unleashing the oil industry? Unlikely. Quebec is the most protectionist of the provinces and the most antioil.

This is all because foreign money pours money into our elections making sure our resources cannot compete with American and other producers.

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Unread postPosted: November 17th, 2019, 2:18 pm 
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This says it all.

http://thenelsondaily.com/news/texas-mo ... nt-alberta
Texas more than twice as attractive for oil, gas investment than Alberta

Texas is more than two times as attractive than Alberta for oil and gas investment, according to a new survey of petroleum-sector executives released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan, Canadian public policy think-tank.

“Canada’s onerous and uncertain regulations, along with our dearth of pipeline capacity has created a competitiveness chasm between Canada and the United States—particularly between Alberta and Texas,” said Ashley Stedman, senior policy analyst at the Fraser Institute and co-author of the Canada-US Energy Sector Competitiveness Survey.

The survey, conducted between May and August of this year, ranks 20 North American jurisdictions (15 states and five provinces) based on policies affecting oil and gas investment.

This year, Texas ranked 1st while Alberta ranked 16th out of 20.

Likewise, 65 per cent of respondents identified regulatory duplication and inconsistencies as a deterrent to investing in Alberta compared to eight per cent for Texas.

Rounding out the top five most attractive jurisdictions for oil and gas investment are Oklahoma (2nd), Kansas (3rd), Wyoming (4th) and the US-Gulf of Mexico region (5th).

Among the survey’s 20 jurisdictions, Saskatchewan (13th) was the most attractive Canadian province followed by Newfoundland and Labrador (15), Manitoba (17th) and British Columbia (19th). Colorado (20th) was the least-attractive jurisdiction.

“Policies matter, and when the oil and gas sector is very clearly indicating that American jurisdictions are more attractive for investment, policymakers should take note,” said Kenneth Green, resident scholar and chair of energy and natural resource studies at the Fraser Institute.

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Unread postPosted: November 17th, 2019, 4:39 pm 
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Herman wrote:
This says it all.

http://thenelsondaily.com/news/texas-mo ... nt-alberta
Texas more than twice as attractive for oil, gas investment than Alberta

Texas is more than two times as attractive than Alberta for oil and gas investment, according to a new survey of petroleum-sector executives released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan, Canadian public policy think-tank.

“Canada’s onerous and uncertain regulations, along with our dearth of pipeline capacity has created a competitiveness chasm between Canada and the United States—particularly between Alberta and Texas,” said Ashley Stedman, senior policy analyst at the Fraser Institute and co-author of the Canada-US Energy Sector Competitiveness Survey.

The survey, conducted between May and August of this year, ranks 20 North American jurisdictions (15 states and five provinces) based on policies affecting oil and gas investment.

This year, Texas ranked 1st while Alberta ranked 16th out of 20.

Likewise, 65 per cent of respondents identified regulatory duplication and inconsistencies as a deterrent to investing in Alberta compared to eight per cent for Texas.

Rounding out the top five most attractive jurisdictions for oil and gas investment are Oklahoma (2nd), Kansas (3rd), Wyoming (4th) and the US-Gulf of Mexico region (5th).

Among the survey’s 20 jurisdictions, Saskatchewan (13th) was the most attractive Canadian province followed by Newfoundland and Labrador (15), Manitoba (17th) and British Columbia (19th). Colorado (20th) was the least-attractive jurisdiction.

“Policies matter, and when the oil and gas sector is very clearly indicating that American jurisdictions are more attractive for investment, policymakers should take note,” said Kenneth Green, resident scholar and chair of energy and natural resource studies at the Fraser Institute.

Alberta's competitiveness has dropped under Notley and Trudeau.

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Unread postPosted: November 17th, 2019, 5:44 pm 
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seoulbro wrote:
We have seen a complete reversal of fortunes between Canada and the US since Trudeau replaced Harper and Trump replaced Obama.

By Lorne Gunter of Sun News Media

The latest numbers on economic productivity in Canada are extremely disappointing. And with the Liberals back in power, the numbers are about to get worse, especially considering that the Trudeau government is now held in office by three anti-development parties — the NDP, Greens and Bloc Quebecois.

Even our “have” provinces fall far behind the top American states. And Canada’s poorest — the three Maritime provinces — are at or below the lowest state, Mississippi.

According to work done by Trevor Tombe, a University of Calgary economist, Alberta is Canada’s wealthiest province with a per capita GDP of $64,000 US. Yet that is behind 16 American states. Indeed, Alberta is a full 25% below the richest American jurisdiction— New York state at $86,000.

Perhaps more concerning, though, is the plight of Ontario. Once the economic engine of the country and home to 40% of our national population, Ontario’s annual, per capita GDP is just $48,000 US. That’s only $1,000 better than Kentucky and just 12% above West Virginia — coal-mining, mountain-people West Virginia!

Ontario is producing only slightly more than half the per capital GDP of New York. Indeed, our heartland is closer to Mississippi than to California, Washington state, Alaska and North Dakota.

This is largely the result of the Liberals “green” obsession — first in Ontario under premiers Dalton Mcguinty and Kathleen Wynne and now federally under Justin Trudeau.

This should surprise no one since many of the same people who thought up Ontario’s “green” energy strategy are now devising federal policy.

And it matters far less to these eco-zealots what happens to people’s jobs and standard of living than making expensive, symbolic, useless environmental gestures.

For instance, Ontario Liberal policies gave that province the highest electricity costs on the continent, which contributed to the loss of 200,000 manufacturing jobs in the past 15 years. That should make the architects of Ontario’s “green” energy policies contrite and apologetic. Instead, they are now trying to duplicate their disaster on a national scale.

Instead of trying to revive our economy with more pipelines and manufacturing plants, attracted by loosened regulations and lower taxes, the Liberals in Ottawa are giving every indication of going the opposite direction — more “green” impediments to growth, plus even higher taxes and bigger deficits.

Consider that half a dozen years ago, Alberta was one of the top 5 jurisdictions in North America for attractiveness to international oil and gas investors. Now, thanks to the Liberal-government’s WWGD (What Would Greta Do?) mentality, Alberta is 16 out of 20 according to the latest survey by Vancouver’s Fraser Institute.

Since the Liberals came to office in 2015, over $100 billion in energy-sector investment has been lost.

And the decline of our energy sector is not geological, it’s political. The oil is there. We know how to extract it. Yet thanks to our “green” federal government, there is inadequate ability to get that oil to market, so investors now see Canada as one of the least reliable places to put their money.

And the indications are the Trudeau Liberals will be even more anti-oil in their second term. They wouldn’t stand up to the B.C. provincial NDP’S obstructionism on Trans Mountain during their first term. What do you think the chances are they will stand up to the Bloc (or Greens or NDP) this term, when they need those parties’ votes in the Commons and they hope to steal their voters in the next election?

On Thursday, the Montreal Economic Institute estimated that interprovincial trade barriers cost the national economy between $50 billion and $130 billion a year. That’s between $1,400 and $3,700 per person.

Will the Trudeau government then try to solve its economic and fiscal problems by, among other things, breaking down internal trade barriers and unleashing the oil industry? Unlikely. Quebec is the most protectionist of the provinces and the most antioil.

Canada is run by foreign progs. The people we elect are fronting for them.

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Unread postPosted: November 17th, 2019, 7:46 pm 
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The single biggest way that Canada can reduce global GHG emissions would be to massively increase our exports of liquefied natural gas.

Getting federal support for this job-creating green strategy must be a key part of a fair deal for Alberta.

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prairie redneck.


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Unread postPosted: November 17th, 2019, 8:16 pm 
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Herman wrote:
The single biggest way that Canada can reduce global GHG emissions would be to massively increase our exports of liquefied natural gas.

Getting federal support for this job-creating green strategy must be a key part of a fair deal for Alberta.

I like that better than paying an increasing carbon tax.

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Unread postPosted: November 18th, 2019, 8:21 am 
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Whenever I hear a politician use words like sustainable, I think, uh oh, how much is this going to cost us.


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Unread postPosted: November 18th, 2019, 1:37 pm 
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Velvet wrote:
Whenever I hear a politician use words like sustainable, I think, uh oh, how much is this going to cost us.

lol, so do we.

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Unread postPosted: November 18th, 2019, 4:01 pm 
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Fashionista wrote:
Herman wrote:
The single biggest way that Canada can reduce global GHG emissions would be to massively increase our exports of liquefied natural gas.

Getting federal support for this job-creating green strategy must be a key part of a fair deal for Alberta.

I like that better than paying an increasing carbon tax.

It's effective and it creates jobs at home, so obviously progtards won't do it.

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Unread postPosted: November 18th, 2019, 5:20 pm 
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Velvet wrote:
Whenever I hear a politician use words like sustainable, I think, uh oh, how much is this going to cost us.

There's smart environmentalism. Canada is not pursuing smart environmentalism.

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Unread postPosted: November 20th, 2019, 6:13 pm 
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TMX aint getting built anytime soon if at all.

https://business.financialpost.com/comm ... 6sU_vcip6E
Trans Mountain's biggest obstacle looks set to drag the long-running pipeline saga well into 2022
Construction may have resumed and Trudeau has promised to see TMX through, but it's the legal delays that look set to hold everything back

In February 2019, the NEB again recommended approval of the project. About four months later, the cabinet adopted the Board’s recommendations for a second time.

Virtually immediately, 12 applicants, comprised of eight First Nations, three environmental groups and the City of Vancouver applied for leave to challenge the new approval. The FCA allowed six of the applications — all First Nations — to proceed with challenges to the new consultation that preceded the latest approval.

“The key question for the court is whether the federal government has corrected the defects found in the first round of consultation,” says Matthew Kirchner, counsel to the Squamish Nation, one of the successful applicants.

The FCA is scheduled to hear the case in December, and if the court takes as long to render a decision as it did the first time around — about 11 months — November 2020 will be on the horizon.

But even that may be optimistic.

It turns out that three applicants who didn’t get leave in the FCA as well as two of the applicants who succeeded but found the ruling too narrow in scope have sought leave to appeal the Federal Court’s refusal to hear them to the Supreme Court of Canada (SCC). That could well delay the hearing on the merits scheduled for December in the FCA.

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Unread postPosted: November 20th, 2019, 8:01 pm 
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Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 12755
Herman wrote:
TMX aint getting built anytime soon if at all.

https://business.financialpost.com/comm ... 6sU_vcip6E
Trans Mountain's biggest obstacle looks set to drag the long-running pipeline saga well into 2022
Construction may have resumed and Trudeau has promised to see TMX through, but it's the legal delays that look set to hold everything back

In February 2019, the NEB again recommended approval of the project. About four months later, the cabinet adopted the Board’s recommendations for a second time.

Virtually immediately, 12 applicants, comprised of eight First Nations, three environmental groups and the City of Vancouver applied for leave to challenge the new approval. The FCA allowed six of the applications — all First Nations — to proceed with challenges to the new consultation that preceded the latest approval.

“The key question for the court is whether the federal government has corrected the defects found in the first round of consultation,” says Matthew Kirchner, counsel to the Squamish Nation, one of the successful applicants.

The FCA is scheduled to hear the case in December, and if the court takes as long to render a decision as it did the first time around — about 11 months — November 2020 will be on the horizon.

But even that may be optimistic.

It turns out that three applicants who didn’t get leave in the FCA as well as two of the applicants who succeeded but found the ruling too narrow in scope have sought leave to appeal the Federal Court’s refusal to hear them to the Supreme Court of Canada (SCC). That could well delay the hearing on the merits scheduled for December in the FCA.

Oh I know this.

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A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


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Unread postPosted: November 22nd, 2019, 4:46 am 
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People rely on natural resources for good life

As Canadians grapple with the result of the federal election and the naming of the new cabinet, when it comes to natural resource policy, it’s important to separate whimsical wishes from reality.

Natural resources such as the minerals that help make our cars and bicycles, the petroleum products that make our cell phones and the forestry products that produce our newspapers and the frames for our homes are a fundamental element of our modern existence. Canada is excellent at extracting these resources, and we would all be better off if we could accept and celebrate this.

From the moment we wake up in our machine-woven sheets (polymers) that are stretched over our foam (petroleum) and (metal) spring-filled mattresses, and we reach for our smartphones (aluminum, gold, plastic) and we walk on our laminate (wood, plastic) or stone (quarries) tiled or carpeted (petroleum) floors to the kitchen to start our coffee pots, (plastic, metal) we have depended upon at least a dozen different natural resources while we are still in our pyjamas. Plus shipping.

Producing the raw materials for those goods also directly benefits thousands of Canadian workers. More than 420,000 people work in mining in Canada, with the average pay exceeding $117,000 per year.

Take Trevor for example. Trevor is an Albertan who has worked in natural resources his entire adult life.

When he was in his 20s, he worked as a logger on northern Vancouver Island. Trevor recently shared an amusing anecdote with me about having to weave his truck around protesters waving paper “Don’t Cut Trees” signs, held aloft with wooden stakes. One can safely assume the protesters also lived in wood-framed homes and used paper in their daily lives.

Now that he’s in his 50s, Trevor works in engineering, and his craft has taken him from the energy patch in Alberta to a hydro dam in Newfoundland to potash mines in the prairies. All natural resources, all being protested every step of the way by those who live comfortable lives thanks to those same natural resources they claim to loathe.

Trevor’s income has been slashed in half over the past few years because of these misguided misinformation campaigns waged by protesters. It has affected his family, eaten away at his savings and he has seen his friends and neighbours lose their homes, their vehicles and their marriages.

Trevor told me about some highly paid professionals he knows who are experts in finding and responsibly extracting oil from Canada’s natural oilsands.

Since Alberta’s recession began, and they were laid off, the situation has been so difficult that they’ve been hiding their skills on their resumes, hoping to get jobs at Dairy Queen.

Meanwhile, as Canadian natural resource projects struggle to get off the ground, the world just buys the resources from another country — often countries with inferior environmental regulations.

Ultimately, Canada’s struggles with approving natural resource projects has cost our nation tens of thousands of jobs and a fortune in lost tax revenue for the government.

Second Street.org tallied up the value of several major projects that were halted or cancelled, at least in part due to government policies between 2014-19. The total of this missed opportunity was roughly the equivalent of building an NHL-sized arena every day for a year — a staggering loss.

While politicians often subsidize the construction of new arenas, and boast about jobs they claim they are “creating,” these natural resource projects don’t require subsidies to get off the ground.

What they do require is for Canadians to take pride in, and appreciate what our natural resource sector provides.

Yes, we should strive to do better, but if we don’t sell other nations the resources they want to buy, the world will simply purchase those resources elsewhere and leave Canada behind.

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Unread postPosted: November 22nd, 2019, 5:11 am 
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Many people are in denial about natural resources.

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Unread postPosted: November 22nd, 2019, 7:00 am 
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Natural resources=jobs, technology, amd money for schools/roads/hospitals. But, we want to keep our resource wealth in the ground and use the resources of competitor countries. :negative:

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Unread postPosted: November 22nd, 2019, 7:14 pm 
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"Of the oilpatch, what is there left to say? The greatest attitude shift has to come from you, Prime Minister. You have to, in the common phrase, do a 180 on the oilsands. You have to reverse your focus, stop seeing this great industry as something that (from your perspective) unfortunately “can’t be shut down tomorrow,” as something to be “transitioned” from, i.e., shut down as soon as possible. You have to support it, and vocally.

"For once, get up in a crowded room and declare the importance of this industry to the whole country, pride in the people who work it, astonishment at the level of its technological capacity and invention. It is, of its kind, the best in the world."

https://nationalpost.com/…/rex-murphy-forget-the-cabinet-sh…

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