It is currently December 9th, 2019, 4:40 am

All times are UTC-08:00




Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 437 posts ]  Go to page Previous 118 19 20 21 22 Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Money Sense
Unread postPosted: November 23rd, 2018, 8:21 pm 
User avatar

Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 12680
Another bad day in a write off month on the markets. West Texas Intermediate had it's worse one day loss in over three years. It was down $4.24 to close at $50.39. Obviously energy stocks had a bad day in a bad month. But, so have tech stocks. Biomedical stocks were the only bright spot today and this week.

The Dow was down another 178.74 to close at 24.285.95. The TSX was 78.75 to close at 15,010.73. And CDN $ was basically unchanged at .7555

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Money Sense
Unread postPosted: December 7th, 2018, 8:32 pm 
User avatar

Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 12680
Conserns over trade relations between the U.S. and China remained at the fore. Things took a decided turn for the worse yesterday, after the U.S. requested the arrest of a top executive from one of China’s leading technology companies citing a violation of sanctions on Iran. Today, two administration officials made opposing remarks regarding the progress of negotiations, leading to a further erosion of confidence that the ongoing tariff dispute was any closer to being resolved.

At the closing bell, the Dow 30 was down 559 points, or 2.2%, the S&P 500 was off by 63 (2.3%), and the tech-heavy NASDAQ fared the worst of the lot, tumbling 219 points (3.1%). The downturn was widespread, with declining issues outnumbering advancers by more than two-to-one. Most of the 10 major market sectors were firmly in the red, with the largest losses coming from technology (down 3.0%), consumer cyclicals (2.7%), and healthcare (2.3%). Utilities were the only group to finish on the positive side of the ledger, rising about one-third of a percent. Altogether, this marked the end of a difficult week for stocks, with declines in the key indexes ranging between 3.7% and 4.2%.

Elsewhere, oil prices showed some renewed life, with light sweet crude rising 2% to around $52.55 a barrel. The move came after OPEC and its allies announced that they had agreed to cut oil output by 1.2 million barrels a day. However, the commodity was still down nearly 15% over the past month. Part of this reflects increased output from the U.S., which recently surpassed Saudi Arabia as the largest oil producer.

The TSX had a horrible week for the same reasons as the Dow Jones and Nasdaq finishing the week at 14, 795.13, down another 141.87 today.

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Money Sense
Unread postPosted: December 7th, 2018, 11:12 pm 

Joined: October 4th, 2012, 10:25 pm
Posts: 41381
seoulbro wrote:
Conserns over trade relations between the U.S. and China remained at the fore. Things took a decided turn for the worse yesterday, after the U.S. requested the arrest of a top executive from one of China’s leading technology companies citing a violation of sanctions on Iran. Today, two administration officials made opposing remarks regarding the progress of negotiations, leading to a further erosion of confidence that the ongoing tariff dispute was any closer to being resolved.

At the closing bell, the Dow 30 was down 559 points, or 2.2%, the S&P 500 was off by 63 (2.3%), and the tech-heavy NASDAQ fared the worst of the lot, tumbling 219 points (3.1%). The downturn was widespread, with declining issues outnumbering advancers by more than two-to-one. Most of the 10 major market sectors were firmly in the red, with the largest losses coming from technology (down 3.0%), consumer cyclicals (2.7%), and healthcare (2.3%). Utilities were the only group to finish on the positive side of the ledger, rising about one-third of a percent. Altogether, this marked the end of a difficult week for stocks, with declines in the key indexes ranging between 3.7% and 4.2%.

Elsewhere, oil prices showed some renewed life, with light sweet crude rising 2% to around $52.55 a barrel. The move came after OPEC and its allies announced that they had agreed to cut oil output by 1.2 million barrels a day. However, the commodity was still down nearly 15% over the past month. Part of this reflects increased output from the U.S., which recently surpassed Saudi Arabia as the largest oil producer.

The TSX had a horrible week for the same reasons as the Dow Jones and Nasdaq finishing the week at 14, 795.13, down another 141.87 today.

Our investments performed terribly this week.
:sad:


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Money Sense
Unread postPosted: December 8th, 2018, 9:46 am 
User avatar

Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 12680
Fashionista wrote:
seoulbro wrote:
Conserns over trade relations between the U.S. and China remained at the fore. Things took a decided turn for the worse yesterday, after the U.S. requested the arrest of a top executive from one of China’s leading technology companies citing a violation of sanctions on Iran. Today, two administration officials made opposing remarks regarding the progress of negotiations, leading to a further erosion of confidence that the ongoing tariff dispute was any closer to being resolved.

At the closing bell, the Dow 30 was down 559 points, or 2.2%, the S&P 500 was off by 63 (2.3%), and the tech-heavy NASDAQ fared the worst of the lot, tumbling 219 points (3.1%). The downturn was widespread, with declining issues outnumbering advancers by more than two-to-one. Most of the 10 major market sectors were firmly in the red, with the largest losses coming from technology (down 3.0%), consumer cyclicals (2.7%), and healthcare (2.3%). Utilities were the only group to finish on the positive side of the ledger, rising about one-third of a percent. Altogether, this marked the end of a difficult week for stocks, with declines in the key indexes ranging between 3.7% and 4.2%.

Elsewhere, oil prices showed some renewed life, with light sweet crude rising 2% to around $52.55 a barrel. The move came after OPEC and its allies announced that they had agreed to cut oil output by 1.2 million barrels a day. However, the commodity was still down nearly 15% over the past month. Part of this reflects increased output from the U.S., which recently surpassed Saudi Arabia as the largest oil producer.

The TSX had a horrible week for the same reasons as the Dow Jones and Nasdaq finishing the week at 14, 795.13, down another 141.87 today.

Our investments performed terribly this week.
:sad:

A lot of this is the uncertainty around trade between the world's two biggest economies. But, we have had a very long bull run. Investors are anticipating a period of correction. Rising interest rates are not helping either.

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Money Sense
Unread postPosted: December 27th, 2018, 10:03 am 
User avatar

Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 12680
The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 1,086 points, gaining nearly 5 percent, the biggest point gain in history, Wednesday afternoon after a rough Christmas Day.

The Dow Jones also had the biggest upside move on a percentage basis since March 23, 2009, according to CNBC. This comes as the stock market had its worst week in nearly 10 years from Dec. 17 through Dec. 21, dropping over 400 points.

Investors went bargain shopping the day after Christmas, where stocks just got too cheap relative to earnings, future earnings, any reasonable assessment of earnings. The coast is clear, back up the truck, investors are saying enough already, the world is not ending.

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Money Sense
Unread postPosted: January 3rd, 2019, 4:40 pm 
User avatar

Joined: November 15th, 2018, 11:04 am
Posts: 2108
What a wild day on the stock markets. The Dow shed 660 points because Apple plummeted 10% in its darkest day in six years. Sales in China are down because Chinese consumers are tightening their belts. The Chinese economy is slowing.

_________________
The Russian Rock It


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Money Sense
Unread postPosted: January 4th, 2019, 10:00 am 
User avatar

Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 12680
Gaon wrote:
What a wild day on the stock markets. The Dow shed 660 points because Apple plummeted 10% in its darkest day in six years. Sales in China are down because Chinese consumers are tightening their belts. The Chinese economy is slowing.

China has represented forty to fifty per cent of global growth since the great recession of 2008. A slowdown in their economy will have a greater impact on the world than anything the USA and the EU do combined.

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Money Sense
Unread postPosted: January 6th, 2019, 11:50 am 
User avatar

Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 12680
The markets rebounded to close the week with the Dow, and TSX getting back all the losses from the previous day and then some. Excellent job growth in the USA shows there's lots of steam left in the world's biggest economy, lifting global markets.

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Money Sense
Unread postPosted: January 11th, 2019, 9:00 pm 
User avatar

Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 12680
Canada's main stock index rose for a fifth straight day for the first time in seven months as the market continued to bounce back from last month's lows.

The S&P/TSX composite index closed up 98.76 points to 14,903.49, after hitting a one-month high of 14,921.06 in earlier trading.

The market is eight per cent above the low set late last year but still 10 per cent below the July high.

The Toronto Exchange's performance Thursday was helped by crude oil rising to its highest level in more than a month and further gains among cannabis producers including Canopy Growth Corp.'s 12 per cent gain that boosted the health-care sector by 4.3 per cent.

The February crude contract was up 23 cents at US$52.59 per barrel and the February natural gas contract was down 1.5 cents at US$2.97 per mmBTU.

The energy index increased by more than one per cent, followed by defensive sectors utilities and telecommunications. The only sector to fall was materials.

In New York, the Dow Jones industrial average rose 122.80 points at 24,001.92. The S&P 500 index was up 11.68 points at 2,596.64, while the Nasdaq composite was up 28.99 points at 6,986.07.

The Canadian dollar traded at an average of 75.56 cents US compared with an average of 75.64 cents US on Wednesday.

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Money Sense
Unread postPosted: January 25th, 2019, 5:47 pm 
User avatar

Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 12680
The Dow, the TSX, Nasdaq, oil and the Canadian dollar were all up today and up for the week. The three week market recovery continues even with expected slower growth in China.

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Money Sense
Unread postPosted: February 17th, 2019, 3:28 pm 
User avatar

Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 12680
The Dow Jones Industrial Average jumped 443.86 points to 25,883.25 as J.P. Morgan Chase and Goldman Sachs outperformed. The S&P 500 gained 1.1 percent to close at 2,775.60, led by the energy and industrials sectors. The Nasdaq Composite advanced 0.6 percent to end the day at 7,472.41.

Energy shares were boosted by higher oil prices. West Texas Intermediate futures rose 2.2 percent to $55.59 per barrel.

Bank stocks also rose broadly. The SPDR S&P Bank ETF (KBE) climbed 2.25 percent. Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, J.P. Morgan Chase, Citigroup and Bank of America each advanced 2.54 percent or more.

The 30-stock Dow's eight-week winning streak is its longest since the one ending Nov. 3, 2017. The Nasdaq also posted its eighth consecutive weekly gain. The S&P 500, meanwhile, closed its seventh weekly gain in eight. The indexes rose at least 2.4 percent each this week.

'We’re in for some rough sledding'—Watch three Wall Street experts explain where stocks are headed 'We’re in for some rough sledding'—Watch five Wall Street experts explain where stocks are headed
12:18 PM ET Thu, 14 Feb 2019 | 04:26
Stocks surged on Friday amid increasing hopes for a U.S.-China trade deal as equities posted another solid weekly gain.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average jumped 443.86 points to 25,883.25 as J.P. Morgan Chase and Goldman Sachs outperformed. The S&P 500 gained 1.1 percent to close at 2,775.60, led by the energy and industrials sectors. The Nasdaq Composite advanced 0.6 percent to end the day at 7,472.41.

Energy shares were boosted by higher oil prices. West Texas Intermediate futures rose 2.2 percent to $55.59 per barrel.

Bank stocks also rose broadly. The SPDR S&P Bank ETF (KBE) climbed 2.25 percent. Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, J.P. Morgan Chase, Citigroup and Bank of America each advanced 2.54 percent or more.

The 30-stock Dow's eight-week winning streak is its longest since the one ending Nov. 3, 2017. The Nasdaq also posted its eighth consecutive weekly gain. The S&P 500, meanwhile, closed its seventh weekly gain in eight. The indexes rose at least 2.4 percent each this week.

"The market is just getting rational again and simply rebounding from an irrational sell-off last fall," said Craig Callahan, president at Icon Funds. He said the market was brought down late last year by fears of a Chinese economic hard landing, worries that a slowdown in China could spread around the world and concern over tighter Federal Reserve monetary policy.

TSX increased 152 points or 0.97% to 15848 on Friday February 15 from 15627 in the previous trading session.

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Money Sense
Unread postPosted: February 23rd, 2019, 9:45 am 
User avatar

Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 12680
SNC-Lavalin chopped its dividend by 65% Friday as it reported a fourth quarter loss of $1.6 billion. Could Trudeau's interference have changed that. :icon_wink:

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Money Sense
Unread postPosted: March 11th, 2019, 6:21 pm 
User avatar

Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 12680
The tragic Ethiopian Airlines crash on Sunday is raising doubts on Wall Street about Boeing.

Boeing's (BA) stock closed down 5.36% to $399.89 on Monday in the aftermath of the second deadly crash of its bestselling 737 MAX 8 jet in five months. All 157 people on board the Ethiopian Airlines flight were killed when the plane fell out of the sky shortly after takeoff. It was the second crash of the latest version of Boeing's single-aisle workhorse in recent months.

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Money Sense
Unread postPosted: April 6th, 2019, 10:10 am 
User avatar

Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 12680
The Dow, the TSX, Nasdaq and West Texas Intermediate all ended the week in positive territory. The Dow is closing in on it's all time high. The Canadian dollar was down on this week too based on stronger than expected job numbers in the US and the Canadian economy lost 7200 jobs in March.

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Money Sense
Unread postPosted: April 8th, 2019, 11:30 am 
User avatar

Joined: July 20th, 2015, 7:24 pm
Posts: 16320
I think there is going to be a recession in this country later this year.

https://business.financialpost.com/news ... ng-economy
Now, the nation may already be in recession after growing at an annualized pace of just 0.4 per cent in the fourth quarter and a pretty “soggy” start to the year, said Wolf, part of the asset allocation team at Fidelity Investments Canada, which manages about $136 billion. He stressed his views were his own, not the firm’s.

The big problem for Canada is that a household deleveraging appears to be starting just as the global economy is slowing, said Wolf, who was an adviser at the Bank of Canada before joining Fidelity in 2014. Home values fell nationwide last year for the first time since at least 1990, while household debt burdens touched a record high. Meanwhile, Canada’s competitiveness problems remain, he said.

“You’ve never had debt levels as high, relative to incomes in Canada,” said Tulk. Even if the Bank of Canada has stopped raising rates, “there’s still kind of a big bulge in the python, so to speak, in terms of prior increases in interest rates and prior actions.”

_________________
prairie redneck.


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Money Sense
Unread postPosted: April 15th, 2019, 9:26 am 
User avatar

Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 12680
I decided to post this here. It shows the shocking level of financial ignorance among young workers. Four in ten people under thirty five don't know how CPP works. This doesn't bode well for Canada's future.

Ryan Mallough is Director of Provincial Affairs, Ontario, for the Canadian Federation of Independent Business.

All provinces should be talking about financial literacy

Budgets are always big documents that cover a lot of topics and throw out a lot of dollar figures. That’s why the Ontario government’s Budget 2019 financial and workplace literacy commitments are not getting the notice they deserve, at home nor across the country. Yet they could very well be the budget’s hidden gems.

During the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) expansion debate early in the Trudeau mandate, the Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB) polled Canadians, not only on their opinions of the expansion, but on their general knowledge of what the CPP is and does. A resounding 39 per cent of respondents aged 18 to 34 believed that the government pays into the CPP (it doesn’t).

I come back to this number frequently — it still seems bonkers to me that nearly four in 10 young Canadians don’t know how a significant plank of their retirement — and a major payroll deduction on every paycheque — works.

But when you really think about how we could get to a number like that, it’s impossible to avoid the question: where was the opportunity for young people to have ever really learned about it?

Coming out of high school, I couldn’t have told you what “CPP” stands for, nor “EI”, “RRSP”, “RESP”, “GIC” or “TFSA” – let alone anything about the benefits, drawbacks, or accessibility of any of them.

No high school or university course ever walked me through payroll deductions or how to file my taxes. I didn’t know how to establish a credit rating, how to impact my score or what having a good or bad score really means. Compound interest was a section in math class, presented without implication or context.

Budgeting was reduced to an Excel table that never seemed to include a credit card – odd for a country that has $599 billion in consumer debt.

I learned all these things eventually, mostly through trial by fire at the workplace. You pick things up along the way.

But there has to be a better way.

Canada’s small business owners think so; 53 per cent of them are dissatisfied with the job high schools are doing in preparing young people for the workforce. In Ontario, nearly nine in 10 support the introduction of a mandatory full-credit financial literacy course at the high school level.

If it’s done right and focuses on the practical, a greater emphasis on financial literacy will see students come out of high school far better prepared to make financial decisions and understand the fiscal debates that will impact them as they begin their careers.

On the other side of the financial literacy coin is workplace literacy.

We hear consistently from small business owners that their young hires are woefully under-prepared for the workplace. Too often employers are finding themselves in a position where they are teaching their young hires not only how to do the job they were hired for, but how to generally be an employee – skills like how to be punctual, communicate professionally and manage their time effectively.

I admit, as a Millennial it takes a lot to bite my tongue when this comes up. I know my generation to be as hard-working and ambitious as any other, but when I think back to my education, there really wasn’t an avenue to learn the soft skills employers expect workers to have when entering the workplace.

Furthermore, college, and especially the skilled trades, were never really presented to me as options when I was in high school. I’d be willing to bet nothing has changed if you walk into any high school classroom across the country today and ask students about their plans for the future. Very few – if any – would bring up college or vocational institutions. They’re seen as lesser – a fall-back option if university doesn’t pan out – and that’s not only a shame, but a colossal disservice to both our toprate institutions and the hard-working men and women in the trades.

What’s more, not highlighting these paths has contributed to a skilled tradespeople shortage across Canada. In fact, it has become the number one barrier to small business growth in Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba and British Columbia.

There needs to be a multi-faceted approach to addressing the problem, and young people should play a significant role — but they need to know their options. The Ontario government’s budget commitment last week to promote the skilled trades all the way from kindergarten to Grade 12 is a strong step towards a longterm solution.

The government of Ontario’s focus shows that governments are willing to listen. Their commitments on workplace and financial literacy might be small lines in the budget, but their impact could end up being very big for the future of Canada’s workforce.

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Money Sense
Unread postPosted: May 12th, 2019, 8:32 pm 
User avatar

Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 12680
The markets had a terrible week as trade talks with China stumbled. China appears to be overplaying their hand.

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Money Sense
Unread postPosted: May 30th, 2019, 5:30 pm 
User avatar

Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 12680
The Dow closed slightly higher today at 25,169. the Dow has lost nearly 1800 points since trade talks between China and the US moved into tit for tat tariffs. I expect this is short term and necessary. China has been doing a lot of things they shouldn't since entering the WTO. All American presidents before Trump have enabled China. Even if Trump loses next year's election, the next US president will no longer be able to help China cheat the way Bush, and Obama did.

investors were largely taking a breather in trading as the optimism of earlier in the year has waned and they're evaluating if the sell-off will continue.

Canada's main stock index lost more ground Thursday on a big dip in the energy sector prompted by oil falling to its lowest level in three months.

The S&P/TSX composite index closed down 42.23 points to 16,089.24 following a third-straight day of losses.

The key energy sector fell about 1.5 per cent as Enbridge Inc. and Canadian Natural Resources lost 1.04 and 0.76 per cent respectively.

The July crude contract was down 3.8 per cent or US$2.22 at US$56.59 per barrel and the July natural gas contract was down 7.7 cents at US$2.55 per mmBTU.

Crude prices fell after a weekly U.S. report said stockpiles fell less than expected while geopolitical tensions eased.

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Money Sense
Unread postPosted: May 30th, 2019, 9:29 pm 
User avatar

Joined: July 20th, 2015, 7:24 pm
Posts: 16320
Morgan Stanley is predicting a recession for North America towards the end of the year and most likely the world.

_________________
prairie redneck.


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Money Sense
Unread postPosted: May 31st, 2019, 9:18 pm 
User avatar

Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 12680
The markets capped off the worst week they have had since 2011. Part of that is the five per cent tariff Trump placed on Mexican imports rising to twenty five per cent in October unless Mexico halts “illegal migrants” heading to the U.S. Another downward pressure is a report that China is planning to restrict rare-earths exports leave markets set for a turbulent end to what’s been a rough month for global stocks. This is despite the fact that China doesn't export raw rare earth metals to the US.

West Texas Intermediate crude decreased 5.9% to $53.26 a barrel, the lowest since February. Crude tumbled 16% in May, snapping a four-month winning streak.

The Dow average lost 1.4% and the Nasdaq 100 slid 1.5%. The Dow closed at 24,815.04, losing 354.84 points.

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


Top
   
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 437 posts ]  Go to page Previous 118 19 20 21 22 Next

All times are UTC-08:00


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot], Google [Bot] and 11 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Limited
phpBB SEO
[ GZIP: On ]