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Unread postPosted: May 29th, 2019, 12:50 pm 
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Joined: July 20th, 2015, 7:24 pm
Posts: 13865
Despite all the evidence showing a carbon tax in Canada can’t do anything, Trudeau and McKenna refuse to believe the facts and are ignoring the science.

Justin Trudeau and Catherine McKenna often claim to use ‘facts’ and ‘science’ to justify the hated carbon tax they’re imposing on Canadians.

Yet, the actual facts, and the actual science shows a carbon tax in Canada is a total waste of time, and will do nothing about global emissions.

Take a look at the charts below shared by Bloomberg writer Noah Smith on Twitter, which destroy any possible justification for a carbon tax in Canada:
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Unread postPosted: May 29th, 2019, 12:54 pm 
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https://www.spencerfernando.com/2018/10 ... r90BgqwK1I

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Unread postPosted: June 4th, 2019, 9:37 am 
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Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 11137
By Greg Vezina, chairman of Hydrofuel

There’s no real price on most pollution — all we have is feckless carbon tax

Fossil fuel and green energy supporters are crying the blues over Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s energy and environmental policies.

Trudeau crows about winning a narrow three-to-two split decision of the Saskatchewan government’s appeal of his Greenhouse Gas Pollution Pricing Act (GGPPA) that concluded putting a price on pollution is constitutional, but he neglects to mention not just any climate change plan works.

Trudeau’s carbon tax faces more legal challenges by Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta and perhaps other provinces, and final review by the Supreme Court of Canada.

Meanwhile, Trudeau’s failure to advance the effort to get Canada’s fossil fuel resources to tidewater for sale to global markets, and his proposed legislation on the environmental review of energy projects, have fossil energy supporters upset.

By contrast, the federal Trans Mountain pipeline purchase, LNG subsidies, carbon dioxide emission exemptions for large emitters, the use of natural gas and so-called green energy food-based ethanol as “bridges” away from hydrocarbons has upset the greens.

The real problem is these incentives are costly, inefficient and focused in the wrong places, thereby precluding better industrial technologies and best environmental practices.

An April 2019 University of Chicago study found 30 U.S. state-level programs upped electricity prices as much as 17%, concluding: “The global experiences from carbon markets and taxes make clear that much less expensive ways to reduce CO2 are available right now.”

For example, using a June 2017 joint Concordia University and Montreal Economic Institute study, “Subsidizing electric vehicles inefficient way to reduce CO2 emissions”, as a benchmark, the new $5,000 federal battery vehicle subsidy will cost $200 per ton of emissions — 10 times the current federal carbon tax.

By contrast, producing ammonia (NH3) from natural gas causes 2% of global GHG emissions, and the 90% carbon tax exemption, along with additional exemptions from life cycle emissions, is much less expensive.

It puts the actual “price on pollution” at $4 per ton of emissions, compared to the current federal carbon tax of $20 per ton, rising to $10 per ton in 2022, when Trudeau’s carbon tax will be $50 per ton.

The incremental cost of sequestering carbon in hydrocarbons when making ammonia is 15%, or about $30 per ton, declining in the next five years from nine to five times the cost of polluting under the carbon tax exemption.

In November 2015 “Energy Report” cited a Carnegie Mellon University study on the “Use of NH3 fuel to achieve deep greenhouse gas reductions from U.S. transportation.”

It concluded aggressive implementation of Nh3-fueled vehicles to replace gasoline vehicles, would eliminate 96% of the annual light duty vehicle CO2 emissions projected for 2040, a 718 million metric ton CO2 reduction.

The same backwards situation in Canada exists with respect to the use of better waste remediation technologies for municipal liquid, solid and plastic waste we bury, burn or ship elsewhere.

The Japan Times reported in a June 2017 article that over 1,000 workers process 195 tons of waste plastic a day, making 175 tons of ammonia sold for industrial and medical uses.

In 2014, Washington, D.C., opened North America’s first large-scale high-tech system to turn 1,500 tons of sewage a day into a safe, rich soil amendment and in 2024, Maryland’s Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission will start production.

We need an honest and fair user pay “price on pollution” which includes all life cycle emissions with no exemptions, except for big improvements in state of the art technologies.

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A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


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Unread postPosted: June 4th, 2019, 1:48 pm 
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Joined: April 1st, 2016, 6:51 pm
Posts: 7698
I don't follow all of this, but I know Trudeau's tax is revenue policy, not environmental policy.

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“No issue better illustrates the divide between America’s working class and America’s political class than illegal immigration- Donald J. Trump.


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Unread postPosted: June 14th, 2019, 12:02 pm 
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Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 11137
Don’t say that you weren’t warned: For Justin Trudeau’s carbon tax to accomplish its goals, it will have to go up significantly.

The latest warning comes from the non-partisan Parliamentary Budget Office (PBO).

According to the PBO, Canada will need to boost its carbon tax from $50 a tonne in 2022 to between $102 and $138 a tonne by 2030 if Canada is to meet its Paris Agreement targets on greenhouse gas emissions.

The difference between $102 and $138 a tonne is dependent on the state of the economy and the price of oil over the next 11 years.

However, the PBO’s main estimate is that the carbon tax will need to rise to $102 a tonne by 2030 to close a gap of 79 Mt of emissions in order to meet Canada’s Paris Agreement targets. If the economy grows and oil and gas production increases, emissions could be 55 Mt higher meaning a gap of 134 Mt.

“The additional carbon price needed to achieve the Paris target with a gap of 134 Mt would rise from $10 per tonne in 2023 to $88 per tonne in 2030,” the report reads.

Let’s be honest, talking in mega tonnes and a carbon price per tonne is gibberish to most of us. What does it mean in real terms?

After speaking with Dan McTeague, former Liberal MP and senior analyst with gasbuddy.com, I find out the numbers are staggering.

The increased carbon tax price would mean as much as an extra 26.3 cents per litre for gasoline, once you add in the HST the change would boost the price per litre by at least 29.7 cents per litre. For diesel, it would be at least 35 cents per litre.

“That’s your jet fuel, that’s your bus transportation, that’s your freight. If you want to cripple the economy, be my guest,” McTeague said.

The PBO even suggests that at just $102 a tonne, the carbon tax would shave off 1% of Canada’s GDP by 2030. How much worse will it be if the tax goes to $138 a tonne?

Justin Trudeau has been reluctant to say that the carbon tax will need to rise yet every expert analysis says that it must to achieve his stated goal.

A study by the bureaucrats inside Environment Canada in 2015 said that the carbon tax would have to rise to as much as $300 a tonne to meet Canada’s objectives.

When pushed on the potential rise of the carbon tax, Trudeau has stayed true to form and attacked those that question him. The Liberals have tried to deflect criticism by pointing out that a Nobel prize winning economist has called for a carbon tax to fight climate change.

William Nordhaus won the Nobel Prize for Economics last fall for his work on carbon pricing. Yet the strange thing is that while Trudeau points to this fact as proof that he is on the right track, his proposal is nothing like that of Nordhaus.

Nordhaus, a Yale professor who has been writing on this issue for decades, calls for a very steep carbon tax to change people’s behaviour while lowering other taxes.

Trudeau hasn’t reduced other taxes such as income tax; he has simply introduced a carbon tax on top of other taxes — a carbon tax most experts say is too low to have the desired effect.

As we head towards the October vote and Trudeau tries to make the carbon tax and his fight against climate change a central theme, it will be up to individual voters to hold him to account and ask him how high the tax will go.

We’ve heard from the PBO, now it’s time to hear from Trudeau.
https://torontosun.com/opinion/columnis ... e-by-a-lot

The only people that will be able to afford to heat their homes, take flights, and drive a car will be the Trudeaus if we give JT another term.

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


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Unread postPosted: June 14th, 2019, 1:06 pm 
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Joined: October 4th, 2012, 10:25 pm
Posts: 39163
seoulbro wrote:
Don’t say that you weren’t warned: For Justin Trudeau’s carbon tax to accomplish its goals, it will have to go up significantly.

The latest warning comes from the non-partisan Parliamentary Budget Office (PBO).

According to the PBO, Canada will need to boost its carbon tax from $50 a tonne in 2022 to between $102 and $138 a tonne by 2030 if Canada is to meet its Paris Agreement targets on greenhouse gas emissions.

The difference between $102 and $138 a tonne is dependent on the state of the economy and the price of oil over the next 11 years.

However, the PBO’s main estimate is that the carbon tax will need to rise to $102 a tonne by 2030 to close a gap of 79 Mt of emissions in order to meet Canada’s Paris Agreement targets. If the economy grows and oil and gas production increases, emissions could be 55 Mt higher meaning a gap of 134 Mt.

“The additional carbon price needed to achieve the Paris target with a gap of 134 Mt would rise from $10 per tonne in 2023 to $88 per tonne in 2030,” the report reads.

Let’s be honest, talking in mega tonnes and a carbon price per tonne is gibberish to most of us. What does it mean in real terms?

After speaking with Dan McTeague, former Liberal MP and senior analyst with gasbuddy.com, I find out the numbers are staggering.

The increased carbon tax price would mean as much as an extra 26.3 cents per litre for gasoline, once you add in the HST the change would boost the price per litre by at least 29.7 cents per litre. For diesel, it would be at least 35 cents per litre.

“That’s your jet fuel, that’s your bus transportation, that’s your freight. If you want to cripple the economy, be my guest,” McTeague said.

The PBO even suggests that at just $102 a tonne, the carbon tax would shave off 1% of Canada’s GDP by 2030. How much worse will it be if the tax goes to $138 a tonne?

Justin Trudeau has been reluctant to say that the carbon tax will need to rise yet every expert analysis says that it must to achieve his stated goal.

A study by the bureaucrats inside Environment Canada in 2015 said that the carbon tax would have to rise to as much as $300 a tonne to meet Canada’s objectives.

When pushed on the potential rise of the carbon tax, Trudeau has stayed true to form and attacked those that question him. The Liberals have tried to deflect criticism by pointing out that a Nobel prize winning economist has called for a carbon tax to fight climate change.

William Nordhaus won the Nobel Prize for Economics last fall for his work on carbon pricing. Yet the strange thing is that while Trudeau points to this fact as proof that he is on the right track, his proposal is nothing like that of Nordhaus.

Nordhaus, a Yale professor who has been writing on this issue for decades, calls for a very steep carbon tax to change people’s behaviour while lowering other taxes.

Trudeau hasn’t reduced other taxes such as income tax; he has simply introduced a carbon tax on top of other taxes — a carbon tax most experts say is too low to have the desired effect.

As we head towards the October vote and Trudeau tries to make the carbon tax and his fight against climate change a central theme, it will be up to individual voters to hold him to account and ask him how high the tax will go.

We’ve heard from the PBO, now it’s time to hear from Trudeau.
https://torontosun.com/opinion/columnis ... e-by-a-lot

The only people that will be able to afford to heat their homes, take flights, and drive a car will be the Trudeaus if we give JT another term.

Oh my, there's something to look forward to.
:001_rolleyes:


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Unread postPosted: June 15th, 2019, 12:04 am 
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Joined: April 1st, 2016, 6:51 pm
Posts: 7698
seoulbro wrote:
Don’t say that you weren’t warned: For Justin Trudeau’s carbon tax to accomplish its goals, it will have to go up significantly.

The latest warning comes from the non-partisan Parliamentary Budget Office (PBO).

According to the PBO, Canada will need to boost its carbon tax from $50 a tonne in 2022 to between $102 and $138 a tonne by 2030 if Canada is to meet its Paris Agreement targets on greenhouse gas emissions.

The difference between $102 and $138 a tonne is dependent on the state of the economy and the price of oil over the next 11 years.

However, the PBO’s main estimate is that the carbon tax will need to rise to $102 a tonne by 2030 to close a gap of 79 Mt of emissions in order to meet Canada’s Paris Agreement targets. If the economy grows and oil and gas production increases, emissions could be 55 Mt higher meaning a gap of 134 Mt.

“The additional carbon price needed to achieve the Paris target with a gap of 134 Mt would rise from $10 per tonne in 2023 to $88 per tonne in 2030,” the report reads.

Let’s be honest, talking in mega tonnes and a carbon price per tonne is gibberish to most of us. What does it mean in real terms?

After speaking with Dan McTeague, former Liberal MP and senior analyst with gasbuddy.com, I find out the numbers are staggering.

The increased carbon tax price would mean as much as an extra 26.3 cents per litre for gasoline, once you add in the HST the change would boost the price per litre by at least 29.7 cents per litre. For diesel, it would be at least 35 cents per litre.

“That’s your jet fuel, that’s your bus transportation, that’s your freight. If you want to cripple the economy, be my guest,” McTeague said.

The PBO even suggests that at just $102 a tonne, the carbon tax would shave off 1% of Canada’s GDP by 2030. How much worse will it be if the tax goes to $138 a tonne?

Justin Trudeau has been reluctant to say that the carbon tax will need to rise yet every expert analysis says that it must to achieve his stated goal.

A study by the bureaucrats inside Environment Canada in 2015 said that the carbon tax would have to rise to as much as $300 a tonne to meet Canada’s objectives.

When pushed on the potential rise of the carbon tax, Trudeau has stayed true to form and attacked those that question him. The Liberals have tried to deflect criticism by pointing out that a Nobel prize winning economist has called for a carbon tax to fight climate change.

William Nordhaus won the Nobel Prize for Economics last fall for his work on carbon pricing. Yet the strange thing is that while Trudeau points to this fact as proof that he is on the right track, his proposal is nothing like that of Nordhaus.

Nordhaus, a Yale professor who has been writing on this issue for decades, calls for a very steep carbon tax to change people’s behaviour while lowering other taxes.

Trudeau hasn’t reduced other taxes such as income tax; he has simply introduced a carbon tax on top of other taxes — a carbon tax most experts say is too low to have the desired effect.

As we head towards the October vote and Trudeau tries to make the carbon tax and his fight against climate change a central theme, it will be up to individual voters to hold him to account and ask him how high the tax will go.

We’ve heard from the PBO, now it’s time to hear from Trudeau.
https://torontosun.com/opinion/columnis ... e-by-a-lot

The only people that will be able to afford to heat their homes, take flights, and drive a car will be the Trudeaus if we give JT another term.

Trudeau and the rest of the elitist prog scum's war on working class people. Canada will be a country of rich and poor people only in twenty years thanks to garbage like this.

_________________
“No issue better illustrates the divide between America’s working class and America’s political class than illegal immigration- Donald J. Trump.


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