It is currently October 13th, 2019, 4:37 pm

All times are UTC-07:00




Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 297 posts ]  Go to page Previous 15 6 7 8 915 Next
Author Message
Unread postPosted: January 3rd, 2019, 10:54 am 
User avatar

Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 12100
All those deficits and nothing to show

Looking back, it’s reasonable to call Justin Trudeau’s campaign pledge to run “modest” deficits as a desperation, Hail Mary pass.

The Liberals were the third party when the 2015 campaign began and stayed there for the first half of the long election campaign.

The momentum was with NDP Leader Tom Mulcair and early on Trudeau had failed to differentiate himself.

Then something strange happened. As Stephen Harper and Mulcair nodded in agreement at the merits of balancing the books — and to this day we believe the NDP leader made the right commitment — Trudeau decided to try something different.

The then Liberal leader promised to run three years of modest deficits, no more than $10 billion per year, to jump start the economy. These would help pay for what he was selling as a historic investment in infrastructure across the country.

That helped turn Trudeau’s prospects around and his numbers started to climb. Not so much because of pledging red ink. But because the idea of giving the economy a boost appealed to Canadians worried about their economic future.

Nice idea, we suppose, but the numbers are now in and it looks like Trudeau’s original commitment to Canadians has failed to delivered. His promise resulted in few infrastructure projects of note, even though Trudeau’s Liberal government vastly increased the deficits they originally promised — a projected $19 billion in 2018-19, not the $5.7 billion Trudeau predicted. There were similar, massive misses in previous years.

As worrisome, there isn’t a complete tally of how infrastructure money was spent or what it accomplished.

And the Parliamentary Budget Officer estimates the actual stimulus these tens of billions in borrowed cash generated amounts to just 0.16% growth in GDP, or just under $2 billion annually.

As Lorne Gunter writes in a recent column: “Our economy would have been better off leaving the money in Canadians’ pockets and letting them use it for savings or consumer goods.”

Now there are reports Infrastructure Minister Francois-philippe Champagne is rushing to spend billions more on projects this year, just before the election, to have something to show for Liberal deficits.

Maybe instead they should reassess their longstanding misguided notions that we can spend our way into prosperity and let budgets balance themselves.

It wasn’t true in 2015 and it’s not true now.

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


Top
Unread postPosted: January 4th, 2019, 10:53 am 
User avatar

Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 12100
Canada's jobless rate held steady at 5.6 per cent in December as the economy added 9,300 jobs, but about the same number of people were looking for work.

Most of the jobs were part time, Statistics Canada reported Friday. As 28,300 new part-time jobs were added, 18,900 full-time jobs were lost.

A record-low jobless rate may seem like an encouraging sign, but that figure belies some troubling trends below the surface, one economist says.

"The headline unemployment rate may have defied expectations to remain at a record-low 5.6 per cent, but the way we got there was less encouraging," Brian DePratto of TD Bank said. "Not only were the job gains entirely in part-time work, they were also driven by self-employment as both private firms and the public sector shed jobs."

He also said that despite the economy creating new jobs, wages aren't increasing much, as pay packets grew on average by just 1.5 per cent last year — less than the current inflation rate. "While many measures would suggest the we have a tight labour market, the signal from wages says otherwise."

Across the country, there were job gains in Newfoundland and Labrador, while the job market shrank in Alberta, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. Everywhere else, job market held steady.

December's figure means that for 2018 as a whole, Canada's economy added 163,000 jobs, which represents 0.9 per cent growth. That's lower than the pace of growth seen in 2017 (when the job market expanded 2.3 per cent) and 2016 (when it grew by 1.2 per cent).
https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/canada ... -1.4965916

If it wasn't for self employment and a strong US economy, we'd be in a bad recession.

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


Top
Unread postPosted: January 10th, 2019, 9:25 am 
User avatar

Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 12100
By Lorne Gunter of Sun News Media

Hypocrisy runs rampant

B.C. and Trudeau governments OK with Trans Mountain protests but not First Nation blockade

I’m prepared to bet that most of the protesters opposing the RCMP’S break-up of the Wet’suwet’en First Nation blockade of a natural gas pipeline to the B.C. coast would be appalled if the unelected Senate or Governor General or (gasp!) even the Queen decided to completely override a trade agreement approved by the House of Commons.

Yet that is basically what they are demonstrating in favour of during their cross-country rallies and vigils.

The elected council of the Wet’suwet'en First Nation has approved of the Coastal Gaslink pipeline crossing their land as it travels from natural gas fields in northeastern B.C. to a liquified natural gas (LNG) refinery at Kitimat. The elected council has even signed a development agreement, as have all 19 other First Nations along the route.

The agreements give the bands a share of resources, budgets for education, job coaches, job placement coordinators and on-the-job training for their members. In an open letter released Tuesday, Haisla First Nation Chief Crystal Smith praised the project’s two sponsors, Coastal Gaslink and LNG Canada for their “open communications” with “respect” for the Haisla people (who have not been part of the blockade).

“This land has been our home for thousands of years,” Smith wrote. “The relationship between our Nation and industry has never been this healthy and open … not until now have we had this much influence in seeing (development) happen responsibly and sustainably.”

So, then, just who is behind the blockade the courts ordered removed? After all, the elected First Nations leaders are in favour of the pipeline.

The opposition is led by the five hereditary chiefs of the Wet’suwet’en First Nation, one from each of the Wet’suwet’ens’ five clans. In other words, the opposition blockade is the work of the Senate to undo the democratic will of the Commons.

The analogy isn’t perfect. The Wet’suwet’en seem to revere their hereditary leaders more than the rest of us revere Canada’s appointed senators.

Nonetheless, the analogy isn’t wrong, either. The unelected chiefs of this band in north-central B.C. are subverting the democratic will of their people as expressed through their elected chiefs and councillors.

Of course, these are not spontaneous protests. They are the work of well-funded environmental activist groups. And it would seem the activists care more for their idealistic, urban-elite vision of the environment than they do for concepts like democracy.

Stewart Phillip, the Grand Chief of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs, (who has also been a major opponent of the Trans Mountain and Northern Gateway pipelines), demanded “the provincial and federal governments … revoke the permits for this project until the standards of free, prior and informed consent are met.”

And the activists who have filled the streets of several Canadian cities this week gobbled up Phillip’s contention that Indigenous people were being railroaded by industry and non-indigenous politicians.

But by any reasonable interpretation, the “benefit agreements” signed by the 20 First Nations along the route represent exactly what the activists are demanding – informed consent.

Is it Phillip’s and the protesters’ contention that the elected First Nations councils lack the intelligence to understand what is going on and to give their authorization?

From an Alberta perspective, all of this is more than a little hypocritical.

The same B.C. NDP government that has thrown up every roadblock it can think of to stop the Trans Mountain pipeline seems quite happy to let the federal government use the Mounties to forcibly clear the way for a pipeline that will greatly benefit the B.C. provincial treasury.

Double hypocrisy: The same Trudeau government that has happily stood by and done nothing while protesters blockaded Trans Mountain, moved quickly to evict protesters from B.C.’S pipeline.

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


Top
Unread postPosted: January 23rd, 2019, 10:19 am 
User avatar

Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 12100
Trudeau is putting a large financial strain on big city municipalities by letting migrants to game our safe third party agreement with the USA.

By Brian Lilley of Sun News Media

CALAMITY JUSTIN
Trudeau’s border mistakes to blame for shelter issues


If there is a crisis in housing the homeless in some of Canada’s biggest city shelters, then the problem lies squarely at the feet of one man, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

It is rare for me to blame a federal politician for failing to deal with an issue that is clearly within provincial or municipal jurisdiction. But in this case, the blame goes to the feds for one simple reason: Illegal border crossers.

As a cold snap grips Eastern Canada, shelter systems in some of Canada’s biggest cities are struggling to cope with the number of people seeking a place to stay and a large part of that is due to refugee/asylum seekers that have been pouring across the border illegally since early 2017.

On Monday night, a bitterly cold night in Toronto, there were 6,844 people in shelters, a number that Mayor John Tory says was about 40% refugee/asylum seekers.

That means roughly 2,738 people that were in the shelters were people seeking refuge in Canada, most of them having crossed illegally into Canada at Roxham Rd. on the Quebec-new York border.

That’s more than the total that the RCMP intercepted coming into Canada illegally in all of 2016.

That figure is important because since 2016, Toronto’s shelter system has seen a dramatic increase in people seeking assistance, driven in large part by people that Trudeau invited into this country with his infamous tweet.

In 2016 the Mounties apprehended just 2,464 entering the country illegally. By 2017, the number was 20,593 and in 2018, 19,419.

In that same time, the average number of people seeking assistance in Toronto’s shelters grew from 4,189 in December 2016 to 6,702 seeking assistance in December, 2018.

On Monday night, that number was 6,844.

Mayor John Tory says the federal government needs to do more. Ottawa Mayor Jim Watson’s message is similar.

Watson penned a letter to federal Social Services Minister Jean-yves Duclos, asking for funding to compensate the city for the strain on its social services due to refugee claimants.

Watson noted that city shelters are at capacity and so far, the feds have not provided any additional funding to compensate for the increased costs brought about by the refugee surge.

“Last year, City of Ottawa taxpayers absorbed an estimated $5.7-million budget pressure, due to families crossing the border into Canada; this pressure is anticipated to rise to $6.2 million for 2018,” Watson wrote.

While the nearly $12 million in additional costs pales in comparison to the $75 million that Mayor Tory has said Toronto taxpayers have absorbed, it shows the problem is widespread.

Montreal, the city at the centre of much of the refugee crisis, is also experiencing shelters at capacity.

Homelessness advocates are trying to portray the current situation as a crisis, an epidemic, that requires a national response. While a national response may be necessary, it isn’t because there is a surge in homelessness but because the Trudeau government is letting a problem at the border fester.

The homelessness industry is simply using this to call for more funding for their cause.

But they were singing the same tune 10 years ago when numbers were lower, they were singing the same tune two years ago when the number of people seeking shelter on an average night in Toronto alone was 2,600 lower than it is now.

That increase, that pressure, and the costs that go with it are directly attributable to the border crisis that the Trudeau Liberals won’t deal with.

The same crisis that has seen 40,000 people cross into Canada from the United States, illegally, sucking up resources not only from the immigration and refugee system, but from social services, as well.

There is a crisis, but it isn’t the one that the homelessness advocates claim, it is one of Trudeau’s making and one that he, and he alone, can solve.

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


Top
Unread postPosted: January 23rd, 2019, 10:24 am 
User avatar

Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 12100
Contrary to what the Liberal government says, they are not even close to having illegal immigration under control.

By Anthony Furey of Sun News Media

Illegal crossings didn’t drop much in 2018: year-end numbers

When I think about Canada’s illegal border phenomenon the one quote that keeps coming back to me isn’t from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, or Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen, or Conservative MP Michelle Rempel, the opposition critic on the file.

No, it comes from a senior staffer who made a curious admission during a public city council meeting in Cornwall last August.

The Ontario town not far from Quebec was holding meetings because of their close proximity to Roxham Road, the Quebec street abutting the U.S. border that is ground zero for Canada’s illegal crossing phenomenon.

This particular council meeting involved discussion of how a local military facility was playing host to a tent city that would house hundreds of border crossers in the event of a mass arrival.

Louis Dumas, director general of the government’s domestic immigration programs, was on hand to break it all down for the city.

“What is happening in Canada, said Dumas, falls in line with the great migration of refugees and asylum seekers that have been flowing into Europe for the past few years,” a story in the Cornwall Standard Freeholder explained. Then a direct quote from Dumas: “Canada is no longer protected from this reality.”

This is a wild notion, that what we’ve witnessed the past couple of years is not some blip that will soon die down — as the Liberal government would have you believe — but it’s the new normal. That we are now on the receiving end of a constant stream of migration, whether it’s in line with our policies or not.

Wild perhaps. But it’s now backed up by evidence — year-end numbers just released by the federal government.

The illegal crossings come and go from the news, perhaps leading people to believe that the issue itself comes and goes. That when it’s out of the headlines that means the crossings themselves are gone. Not so. For the past two years, they’ve remained constant.

Back in 2016, the number of people apprehended for crossing “irregularly” into Canada was 2,464 for the entire country. But by the end of 2017, the number for Quebec alone — the Roxham Road hub — had skyrocketed to 18,836 people.

But last year there was the occasional story that told us the numbers were decreasing. Ministers said the situation was under control. Nothing to see here folks. Did that mean the numbers had significantly decreased?

It was a narrative partially based on fact. While there were 2,479 people who crossed into Quebec in April of 2018 — more than all of 2016 combined — the monthly tally had dropped to 1,179 for June. So at that time you could say they’d dropped. The only thing is it went up again in recent months.

The newly revealed figures for 2018 show the year’s total for Quebec is 18,518 people. That’s not at all a significant decrease from the year before.

Adding the other provinces into the mix, the national tally has gone down slightly from 20,593 in 2017 to 19,419 in 2018. What matters though is Quebec — where there is an organized and concerted effort by refugee groups and human trafficking operations to exploit the current border situation. And the Quebec numbers have held steady for two whole years.

The big problem with all of this has nothing to do with who these specific people are, what country they come from or what they look like. The problem is that this is self-selected migration. This is not government policy. Canada has had zero say in this phenomenon. It just started happening one day and, under the current government’s watch, we’ve let it continue.

The new data also shows it’s a fairly constant stream. The new normal. Welcome to Canada.

“Canada is no longer protected from this reality.” Louis dumas

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


Top
Unread postPosted: February 6th, 2019, 7:42 am 
User avatar

Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 12100
What a dangerous mess Trudeau has us in.
Illegal border crossers not fully screened: Report

The claim from the government is that Canadians don’t need to worry about the more than 40,000 people that have crossed the border illegally over the past two years because everyone is screened and vetted.

Well, it turns out that is only partially true.

An internal government document released under access to information laws shows that as of a year ago, there was a backlog of nearly 30,000 people that had not been fully security screened.

“More than 40% of all backlog cases are refugee claimants who are already in Canada but have not been security screened,” the document from the Canada Border Services Agency said.

That 40% amounts to 11,745 refugee claimants. Surely that number has grown since February 28, 2018.

And the government can’t deny that this is a direct result of the illegal border crossers coming across at Roxham Road where Quebec and New York State meet, because the number of refugee claimants in the backlog has grown in lock-step with those arrivals.

At the end of February 2016, CBSA had a security screening backlog of 5,419 cases — of those 1,683 were refugee claimants.

Two years and a Justin Trudeau tweet later, the backlog for refugee claimants is over 11,000. The government continually says the illegal border crossers don’t put any strain on the system — a claim they made about the CBSA in the House of Commons on Monday.

Clearly there is a strain, or the backlog would not be where it is.

The government has been shifting hundreds of agents in and out of southern Quebec to deal with this issue.

They’ve done the same with RCMP officers and bureaucrats from other departments.

And even with all of that, they can’t keep up — something the department admits in this 33 page internal presentation.

“Factors leading to extended times in the backlog include sheer volume of referrals, incomplete referrals, and a lack of system functionality to close some referrals as ‘unable to security screen,’” the document states.

So while the politicians say there is nothing to worry about, no problems, everything is working fine, the bureaucrats own internal reports state that the “sheer volume” is a problem.

This isn’t the only report showing a strain on the system that politicians want to ignore.

A different report from bureaucrats released to Toronto City Council’s budget committee on Monday said that the city’s shelter system was “overwhelmed” by refugee claimants.

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


Top
Unread postPosted: February 7th, 2019, 2:28 pm 
User avatar

Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 12100
I guess we shouldn't be surprised that the dumbest, most unqualified, most out of touch person to ever hold the nation's highest elected position didn't know poor people pay taxes too.

Trudeau’s latest out-of-touch gaffe

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has a growing list of “greatest hits” gaffes.

Canada’s current spat with China has reminded us all of his comment about admiring their “basic dictatorship.”

and every year around budget time we’re reminded of how he proclaimed that “the budget will balance itself.”

It looks like he’s trying out a new contender for top prize, after rolling out his latest gaffe in Question Period on Tuesday.

Conservative finance critic Pierre Poilievre was grilling Trudeau on whether his government would commit to zero tax increases while hitting the campaign trail later this year.

“How much will taxes go up and who will have to pay?” Poilievre demanded to know. He then offered up the example of how Trudeau had decided to cancel the child fitness tax credit.

The PM responded with this: “We see proof that the Conservatives simply don’t understand that low-income families don’t benefit from tax breaks because they don’t pay taxes.”

Jaws dropped. an online furor erupted as regular Canadians read these strangely out of touch remarks.

It’s a bit rich coming from someone who is, well, more than a bit rich himself. Trudeau, who inherited a trust fund from his father, says low income people don’t need tax breaks because they don’t pay taxes?!

as many critics noted, Trudeau’s comments just aren’t accurate.

Low income Canadians do pay taxes, many of them: Income tax.

Sales tax. The incoming carbon tax.

Someone earning just $28,000 a year in Ottawa — the equivalent of minimum wage in Ontario — will pay $4,782 in taxes,” Brian Lilley explains in his column.

“That includes $1,998 in federal tax, $1,106 in provincial tax and $1,678 in CPP and EI premiums. It’s an average tax rate of 11%.”


The Conservatives doubled down on their criticism of the PM in Question Period on Wednesday. Instead of apologizing or correcting the record, Trudeau hunkered down himself.

He argued that the Liberal approach was the cost effective one for Canadian families.

If he really cared about regular Canadians, he wouldn’t be so flippant with his words.

The truth is Trudeau’s got it completely backwards: It’s low income Canadians who need tax relief the most.

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


Top
Unread postPosted: February 7th, 2019, 2:35 pm 
User avatar

Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 12100
His ignorance shows he's not qualified to be PM. But, don't expect the CBC to hold his feet to the fire.

TRUST-FUND TRUDEAU
Does PM think taxes pay themselves?


It shouldn’t be a shock, coming from a guy that thinks budgets balance themselves.

On Tuesday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said low-income Canadians don’t pay taxes.

“The Conservatives simply don’t understand that low-income families don’t benefit from tax breaks because they don’t pay taxes,” Trudeau thundered.

The PM was responding to a question from Conservative finance critic Pierre Poilievre, who charged that Trudeau has hiked taxes on many Canadians and will do so again if re-elected.

It should have been an easy question for Trudeau to swat away. Instead he proved a central Conservative talking point: that trustfund Trudeau is so out of touch with the ordinary lives of Canadians that he doesn’t know that low-income Canadians pay all kinds of taxes.

From GST to the coming carbon tax, CPP, EI and even income tax.

Someone earning just $28,000 a year in Ottawa

— the equivalent of minimum wage in Ontario — will pay $4,782 in taxes.

That includes $1,998 in federal tax, $1,106 in provincial tax and $1,678 in CPP and EI premiums.

It’s an average tax rate of 11%.

Maybe ‘trust-fund Trudeau’ doesn’t get that.

Maybe for him dropping 11% of his income would be nothing, but to most of us we notice.

By the way, drop that figure to an annual income of $14,000 and you’re still paying a total tax bill of $879 — most of it to the feds.

Sure, some of that will come back to the low-income taxpayer through tax credits, refunds and the like, but that only happens in April, or in quarterly instalments.

Those low-income Canadians still pay taxes all year round.

Then there is the tax they pay when they buy clothes, a cup of coffee, when they fill up the gas tank or the taxes paid indirectly to ride public transit.

On Wednesday, Trudeau had the chance to back away from his ridiculous statement, but instead he attacked the Conservatives as not caring about the middle class.

Which is strange because, under the Conservatives, both the middle class and and low-income Canadians saw their fortunes improve, according to a report from the Parliamentary Budget Officer.

But Trudeau just wanted to bang on and on about Conservative policies instead of discussing his ridiculous and out-of-touch statement.

Maybe it’s unfair for Trudeau to know what low-income Canadians pay or don’t pay.

His family hasn’t needed to work since his grandfather, Charles, made the family fortune — mostly from a chain of gas stations in the 1930s.

That fortune allowed Pierre Trudeau to traipse around the world before settling down to forge a career and much of that fortune — which has grown — was left to Justin in a trust fund.

The Conservatives took aim at that, especially pointing out that Trudeau had closed what he called tax loopholes for small business but hadn’t touched the tax advantage offered to trust funds.

“How much money did he save by taking advantage of the trust fund tax loophole?” Poilievre asked.

To Trudeau it was nothing but a personal attack, but in reality a valid question.

We have a PM who has literally called small-business owners “tax cheats” and implied most only incorporate for the tax advantages — tax advantages he tried to take away.

Shouldn’t we have a sense of the tax advantages that have helped what he himself calls his “family fortune?”

Trudeau likes to talk about helping the middle class and those working hard to join it. Don’t believe the hype.

This is a man who’s about to impose a new consumption tax on a large part of the country, his beloved carbon tax.

He isn’t cutting all other taxes, or any other taxes, the way Nobel prize winning economists would have done. He’s simply adding to your tax bill and telling you it’s good for you. How would he know? He has never had to worry about a bill in his life and he thinks low income people don’t pay taxes.

Just like budgets balance themselves.

This guy has to go.

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


Top
Unread postPosted: February 7th, 2019, 2:44 pm 
User avatar

Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 12100
A recession in Canada would make 2008 look like a brief down turn. We are the most indebted people in the G20. And the feds and provinces have little room to increase spending.

By Mark Bonokosi of Sun News Media

Federal fiscal fright
Thinktank: Recession will trigger huge deficits


If a recession hit now, look for the deficit to almost double.

The bejeebers is already being scared out of people, with various surveys laying out doom-and-gloom prophecies that leave stomachs unsettled.

Like a poll for the insolvency firm MNP Ltd., for example, that shows 46% of Canadians are $200 or less away from bankruptcy at month’s end, and could teeter over the brink if interest rates even nudge a little higher.

This is known as living paycheque to paycheque or, even worse, living above one’s means via credit card or a burgeoning line of credit.

One thing it isn’t, however, is wise financial planning.

The Fraser Institute, a conservative-minded Canadian thinktank, released a report Thursday out of Vancouver on how an economic downturn or recession this year might impact the federal government’s already overblossomed budget deficit pushing $20 billion on a national debt of $667 billion. Suffice, it isn’t good news. In a year-end interview with The Canadian Press, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau told Canadians they need not worry about deficits because the federal government carries a strong rating from international bond-rating agencies and, what the hell, he plans to head into the October election using the friendlier debt-to-gdp ratio as his main fiscal guide.

The Fraser Institute, however, says a closer eye should be kept on looming economic slowdown and recessions, which, on average, have occurred every eight years since the Second World War.

The report’s authors — Milagros Palacios, Jake Fuss and Jason Clemens — analyzed three economic downturns and the impact of similar-fact scenarios if they happened this year.

If the 1991-92 recession hit now, the 2019-20 federal deficit would increase from its projected $19.6 billion to $28.2 billion.

If the 2000-01 slowdown were to repeat itself now, the 2019-20 deficit would hit $32.1 billion.

And if Canada experienced a more severe recession like in 2008-09, the 201920 deficit would increase 76% to $34.4 billion.

“Given we haven’t had a recession in Canada since 2009,” says Clemens, also the Fraser Institute’s executive vice-president. “Policymakers should seriously consider and plan for the automatic pressures a recession will place on federal finances — even before discretionary spending comes into play.”

Clemens adds this warning to the Trudeau Liberals game of running up deficits as the good times are rolling, and without a projected return to a balanced budget until 2040 — which is 21 long years from now.

“By running deficits during a period of economic growth, there is a real risk the country’s finances will deteriorate rapidly when the next recession hits,” Clemens says in the institute’s just-released report.

For those afraid of what might happen, the Fraser Institute reminds readers that its report gives a conservative view, and whatever deficit emerges this year will “likely be much higher” once the federal government enacts policy changes to stimulate the economy.

“Regardless of the severity of the recession, the risks posed to federal finances are considerable,” reads the report. “The federal government needs to alter Canada’s current trajectory by emphasizing deficit reduction in future budgets.”

That, of course, is not about to happen.

The Trudeau Liberals continue to spend at near unprecedented levels beyond war, recession and the end of the world, and financing all of it on the borrowed money that has resulted in $58.1 billion in cumulative deficits over the last three fiscal years.

After all, borrowed money is still cheap — for now.

Right? Interest rates remain relatively low.

And, as for Canadians, while 46% of us are $200 away from bankruptcy at the end of the month, and therefore bejeebers scared, the other 54% of us are apparently not.

So, why worry?

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


Top
Unread postPosted: February 7th, 2019, 3:34 pm 
User avatar

Joined: July 20th, 2015, 7:24 pm
Posts: 15221
seoulbro wrote:
His ignorance shows he's not qualified to be PM. But, don't expect the CBC to hold his feet to the fire.

TRUST-FUND TRUDEAU
Does PM think taxes pay themselves?


It shouldn’t be a shock, coming from a guy that thinks budgets balance themselves.

On Tuesday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said low-income Canadians don’t pay taxes.

“The Conservatives simply don’t understand that low-income families don’t benefit from tax breaks because they don’t pay taxes,” Trudeau thundered.

The PM was responding to a question from Conservative finance critic Pierre Poilievre, who charged that Trudeau has hiked taxes on many Canadians and will do so again if re-elected.

It should have been an easy question for Trudeau to swat away. Instead he proved a central Conservative talking point: that trustfund Trudeau is so out of touch with the ordinary lives of Canadians that he doesn’t know that low-income Canadians pay all kinds of taxes.

From GST to the coming carbon tax, CPP, EI and even income tax.

Someone earning just $28,000 a year in Ottawa

— the equivalent of minimum wage in Ontario — will pay $4,782 in taxes.

That includes $1,998 in federal tax, $1,106 in provincial tax and $1,678 in CPP and EI premiums.

It’s an average tax rate of 11%.

Maybe ‘trust-fund Trudeau’ doesn’t get that.

Maybe for him dropping 11% of his income would be nothing, but to most of us we notice.

By the way, drop that figure to an annual income of $14,000 and you’re still paying a total tax bill of $879 — most of it to the feds.

Sure, some of that will come back to the low-income taxpayer through tax credits, refunds and the like, but that only happens in April, or in quarterly instalments.

Those low-income Canadians still pay taxes all year round.

Then there is the tax they pay when they buy clothes, a cup of coffee, when they fill up the gas tank or the taxes paid indirectly to ride public transit.

On Wednesday, Trudeau had the chance to back away from his ridiculous statement, but instead he attacked the Conservatives as not caring about the middle class.

Which is strange because, under the Conservatives, both the middle class and and low-income Canadians saw their fortunes improve, according to a report from the Parliamentary Budget Officer.

But Trudeau just wanted to bang on and on about Conservative policies instead of discussing his ridiculous and out-of-touch statement.

Maybe it’s unfair for Trudeau to know what low-income Canadians pay or don’t pay.

His family hasn’t needed to work since his grandfather, Charles, made the family fortune — mostly from a chain of gas stations in the 1930s.

That fortune allowed Pierre Trudeau to traipse around the world before settling down to forge a career and much of that fortune — which has grown — was left to Justin in a trust fund.

The Conservatives took aim at that, especially pointing out that Trudeau had closed what he called tax loopholes for small business but hadn’t touched the tax advantage offered to trust funds.

“How much money did he save by taking advantage of the trust fund tax loophole?” Poilievre asked.

To Trudeau it was nothing but a personal attack, but in reality a valid question.

We have a PM who has literally called small-business owners “tax cheats” and implied most only incorporate for the tax advantages — tax advantages he tried to take away.

Shouldn’t we have a sense of the tax advantages that have helped what he himself calls his “family fortune?”

Trudeau likes to talk about helping the middle class and those working hard to join it. Don’t believe the hype.

This is a man who’s about to impose a new consumption tax on a large part of the country, his beloved carbon tax.

He isn’t cutting all other taxes, or any other taxes, the way Nobel prize winning economists would have done. He’s simply adding to your tax bill and telling you it’s good for you. How would he know? He has never had to worry about a bill in his life and he thinks low income people don’t pay taxes.

Just like budgets balance themselves.

This guy has to go.

But, he won't go. This destructive imbecile is loved by the msm.

_________________
prairie redneck.


Top
Unread postPosted: February 7th, 2019, 9:04 pm 

Joined: July 20th, 2015, 2:33 pm
Posts: 891
Newsflash Justin: poor people pay taxes. Trust fund brats don't.

_________________
gay, conservative and proud


Top
Unread postPosted: February 22nd, 2019, 6:11 pm 
User avatar

Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
Posts: 12100
'Crisis of our own making': Regulatory logjam has cost $100B in cancelled resource projects
More to be expected without major amendments to Bill C-69: C.D. Howe


CALGARY – A new report shows $100 billion in planned spending on resource projects in Canada has evaporated, and a further drop should be expected without substantial amendments to the Liberal government’s planned regulatory overhaul in Bill C-69.

As Senate hearings into the controversial bill continued Thursday, the C.D. Howe Institute released a report detailing how recent declines in planned energy, mining and forestry investment in Canada totalling $100 billion is equivalent to erasing 4.5 per cent from Canada’s gross domestic product.

TransCanada Corp.’s $15-billion Energy East pipeline, CNOOC Ltd.’s Aurora LNG and Petronas Bhd’s $36-billion Pacific NorthWest LNG project are among the major resource projects that have been cancelled in recent years after long and uncertain regulatory processes, contributing to the $100-billion figure.

The declines in planned investment in Canada’s resource sector have continued even as investments in competing jurisdictions have rebounded following a years-long decline in commodity prices, said C.D. Howe Institute associate director of research Grant Bishop, who co-authored the report.

“U.S. and global investment in oil and gas has rebounded while in Canada it has continued to plunge,” Bishop said, adding, “Global planned investment in mining has dropped but it has dropped further in Canada.”

Part of the issue is long regulatory timelines. The study shows it can take up to 15 years to get a mine approved in Canada, compared with six years in Australia. Or it can take up to 11 years for pipeline approvals in Canada, compared with two years in Australia or five years in the U.S.
https://business.financialpost.com/comm ... e-projects

Trump's USA and the Liberal party of Australia are open for business. Trudeau's Canada doesn't want investment and the jobs and money that go along with it.

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


Top
Unread postPosted: February 22nd, 2019, 6:59 pm 
User avatar

Joined: November 15th, 2018, 11:04 am
Posts: 1972
seoulbro wrote:
'Crisis of our own making': Regulatory logjam has cost $100B in cancelled resource projects
More to be expected without major amendments to Bill C-69: C.D. Howe


CALGARY – A new report shows $100 billion in planned spending on resource projects in Canada has evaporated, and a further drop should be expected without substantial amendments to the Liberal government’s planned regulatory overhaul in Bill C-69.

As Senate hearings into the controversial bill continued Thursday, the C.D. Howe Institute released a report detailing how recent declines in planned energy, mining and forestry investment in Canada totalling $100 billion is equivalent to erasing 4.5 per cent from Canada’s gross domestic product.

TransCanada Corp.’s $15-billion Energy East pipeline, CNOOC Ltd.’s Aurora LNG and Petronas Bhd’s $36-billion Pacific NorthWest LNG project are among the major resource projects that have been cancelled in recent years after long and uncertain regulatory processes, contributing to the $100-billion figure.

The declines in planned investment in Canada’s resource sector have continued even as investments in competing jurisdictions have rebounded following a years-long decline in commodity prices, said C.D. Howe Institute associate director of research Grant Bishop, who co-authored the report.

“U.S. and global investment in oil and gas has rebounded while in Canada it has continued to plunge,” Bishop said, adding, “Global planned investment in mining has dropped but it has dropped further in Canada.”

Part of the issue is long regulatory timelines. The study shows it can take up to 15 years to get a mine approved in Canada, compared with six years in Australia. Or it can take up to 11 years for pipeline approvals in Canada, compared with two years in Australia or five years in the U.S.
https://business.financialpost.com/comm ... e-projects

Trump's USA and the Liberal party of Australia are open for business. Trudeau's Canada doesn't want investment and the jobs and money that go along with it.

We should have immigrated to Australia.

_________________
The Russian Rock It


Top
Unread postPosted: February 22nd, 2019, 8:55 pm 
User avatar

Joined: August 21st, 2013, 2:57 pm
Posts: 4839
I wouldnt mind immigrating to Australia. Fuck Canada. Its getting really pathetic here.

_________________
Not thinking about anything is Zen. Once you know this, walking, sitting, or lying down, everything you do is Zen.
~ Bodhidharma


Top
Unread postPosted: February 22nd, 2019, 9:03 pm 
User avatar

Joined: October 4th, 2012, 10:25 pm
Posts: 41347
Berry Sweet wrote:
I wouldnt mind immigrating to Australia. Fuck Canada. Its getting really pathetic here.

I wouldn't mind being there for the next week or so....the deep freeze continues.


Top
Unread postPosted: February 22nd, 2019, 9:21 pm 
User avatar

Joined: July 20th, 2015, 7:24 pm
Posts: 15221
seoulbro wrote:
'Crisis of our own making': Regulatory logjam has cost $100B in cancelled resource projects
More to be expected without major amendments to Bill C-69: C.D. Howe


CALGARY – A new report shows $100 billion in planned spending on resource projects in Canada has evaporated, and a further drop should be expected without substantial amendments to the Liberal government’s planned regulatory overhaul in Bill C-69.

As Senate hearings into the controversial bill continued Thursday, the C.D. Howe Institute released a report detailing how recent declines in planned energy, mining and forestry investment in Canada totalling $100 billion is equivalent to erasing 4.5 per cent from Canada’s gross domestic product.

TransCanada Corp.’s $15-billion Energy East pipeline, CNOOC Ltd.’s Aurora LNG and Petronas Bhd’s $36-billion Pacific NorthWest LNG project are among the major resource projects that have been cancelled in recent years after long and uncertain regulatory processes, contributing to the $100-billion figure.

The declines in planned investment in Canada’s resource sector have continued even as investments in competing jurisdictions have rebounded following a years-long decline in commodity prices, said C.D. Howe Institute associate director of research Grant Bishop, who co-authored the report.

“U.S. and global investment in oil and gas has rebounded while in Canada it has continued to plunge,” Bishop said, adding, “Global planned investment in mining has dropped but it has dropped further in Canada.”

Part of the issue is long regulatory timelines. The study shows it can take up to 15 years to get a mine approved in Canada, compared with six years in Australia. Or it can take up to 11 years for pipeline approvals in Canada, compared with two years in Australia or five years in the U.S.
https://business.financialpost.com/comm ... e-projects

Trump's USA and the Liberal party of Australia are open for business. Trudeau's Canada doesn't want investment and the jobs and money that go along with it.

And it's all on Trudeau and the premeirs of Alberta and BC.

_________________
prairie redneck.


Top
Unread postPosted: February 23rd, 2019, 2:20 pm 
User avatar

Joined: April 24th, 2015, 7:57 pm
Posts: 24637
Fashionista wrote:
Berry Sweet wrote:
I wouldnt mind immigrating to Australia. Fuck Canada. Its getting really pathetic here.

I wouldn't mind being there for the next week or so....the deep freeze continues.


High 30's and low 40's this week.

Come on down.

_________________
Just because I don't agree with you, it does not mean I hate you


Top
Unread postPosted: February 24th, 2019, 1:19 pm 
User avatar

Joined: October 4th, 2012, 10:25 pm
Posts: 41347
Bricktop wrote:
Fashionista wrote:
Berry Sweet wrote:
I wouldnt mind immigrating to Australia. Fuck Canada. Its getting really pathetic here.

I wouldn't mind being there for the next week or so....the deep freeze continues.


High 30's and low 40's this week.

Come on down.

I would love to..

I'll bring our prime minister, but I won't bring him back.


Top
Unread postPosted: February 24th, 2019, 9:58 pm 
User avatar

Joined: April 24th, 2015, 7:57 pm
Posts: 24637
Ah...no. We have strict wildlife import restrictions.

But we'll swap you a koala for a wolverine.

_________________
Just because I don't agree with you, it does not mean I hate you


Top
Unread postPosted: February 24th, 2019, 10:10 pm 
User avatar

Joined: July 20th, 2015, 7:24 pm
Posts: 15221
Bricktop wrote:
Ah...no. We have strict wildlife import restrictions.

But we'll swap you a koala for a wolverine.

Every time that idiotic virtue signalling wanker boards a plane I hope he doesn't return.

_________________
prairie redneck.


Top
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 297 posts ]  Go to page Previous 15 6 7 8 915 Next

All times are UTC-07:00


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot], MSN [Bot] and 17 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Limited
phpBB SEO
[ GZIP: On ]