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Unread postPosted: February 25th, 2019, 12:34 pm 
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Ideologue Butts will be back
Green policies weakened economy


Only the most naive of souls would believe Gerald Butts’ abrupt departure from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s office marks the end of an era.

Butts may physically no longer be present in Trudeau’s office, but I guarantee his influence will endure.

I remember Butts when he was out of power, a charming young staffer with the glint of idealistic fervour in his eye, in the office of Ontario’s then-opposition leader Dalton Mcguinty.

He was then, and is now, an ideologue with a passion for inflicting his own environmental causes on the rest of the country.

Like many of the Liberal strategists around Mcguinty, he was very good at winning elections on tissue-thin promises and not so good at governing. Yes, his supporters now laud him as the guy who drove the closure of Ontario’s coal-fired generating plants. But it was a foolhardy pledge at that time.

Mcguinty’s platform in 2003 was to shut down all coal generation by 2007 — a plan that was laughably impractical. In fact, the last plant wasn’t closed until 2013, but the road to closure was littered with disasters — including the cancellation of two gas-fired generating plants that were hastily planned to make up the electricity shortfall.

Mcguinty’s backroom operatives were so convinced of their moral superiority that promising anything was acceptable when it came to getting elected. And re-elected.

It was bad enough when they doubled Ontario’s debt and forced the price of electricity sky high. When Butts took the show on the road to Ottawa, you knew there’d be trouble.

It’s one thing to wreak economic havoc on the province that was once the country’s powerhouse. It’s quite another when you move on to the national stage and place the economy of the entire country on its back foot. Alberta’s economy is tanking, and you wonder if Trudeau and Butts could find it on a map.

Former Conservative prime minister Stephen Harper may not have been the merriest of leaders this country has seen, but he and his ministers were respected on the international stage. The same can’t be said of Trudeau. Butts, as Trudeau’s closest advisor, must bear much of the blame.

Instead, we get silly platitudes about sunny ways and a self-righteous government that travels the world virtue-signalling the latest trendy leftist cause.

“Canada’s back,” Trudeau sanctimoniously opined after he was elected. We’d actually never gone anywhere. Now we’ve gone from a respected player on the world scene to the wimpy kid everyone ignores.

Butts appears to have resigned to restore unity in the federal Liberal caucus.

And that fits with that nice young man I knew at Queen’s Park. His sense of duty to the party and the causes he champions no doubt propelled him to become the sacrificial lamb at the altar of liberalism.

But that’s no way to run a country. Good government is about more than the ideology of one person.

Nature abhors a vacuum. Butts will be back because in a world so short on true leadership, we often confuse clever campaigners for true geniuses.

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A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


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Unread postPosted: February 28th, 2019, 9:15 am 
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JUSTIN TRUDEAU FACES CALLS TO RESIGN, AS OPPOSITION SAYS HE HAS LOST THE 'MORAL AUTHORITY' TO GOVERN
https://www.newsweek.com/justin-trudeau ... ty-1347094
Quote:
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has rejected calls to resign over a scandal that has rocked his administration in which senior officials have been accused of attempting to protect from prosecution a major Montreal-based engineering company accused of bribery.

Calling on Royal Canadian Mounted Police to immediately launch an investigation into the claims against members of the Trudeau administration if it has not done so already, Scheer said he believes that Trudeau has "lost the moral authority to govern" in the wake of the allegations leveled against his government.

Scheer's statement came after Canada's former Minister of Justice and Attorney General Jody Wilson-Raybould described a coordinated effort by senior officials close to Trudeau to discourage her from prosecuting Canadian firm SNC-Lavalin over accusations of fraud and bribery.

Wilson-Raybould said she was barraged with demands and even veiled threats asking her to shut down the case and pursue a deferred prosecution agreement instead, which would allow SNC-Lavalin to pay a fine to address the allegations.

She also described a meeting with Trudeau himself, at which she alleges the prime minister asked her to "help out" with the case, saying he was concerned as a member of parliament for Quebec that SNC-Lavalin jobs could be left hanging in the balance if the case were to move forward.

Wilson-Raybould said she had asked the prime minister at the time: “Are you politically interfering with my role as attorney general?" and warned him that she "would strongly advise against it."

"No, no, no. We just need to find a solution," she described the Canadian leader as saying.

Despite allegedly facing pressure to drop the case, Wilson-Raybould said she pursued it, but after four months, was demoted to veteran affairs minister.

The former attorney general said during her testimony this week that she viewed her demotion as reminiscent of the infamous Saturday Night Massacre, a key moment in the U.S. Watergate scandal that saw former President Richard Nixon fire Special Prosecutor Archibald Cox before accepting the resignations of Attorney General Elliot Richardson and Deputy Attorney General William Ruckelshaus.


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Unread postPosted: February 28th, 2019, 11:45 am 
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Justin Trudeau is the only pm to be found in violation of ethics law.

Federal ethics commissioner Mary Dawson concluded Trudeau violated the rules when he vacationed last Christmas at the private Bahamian island owned by the Aga Khan and when his wife and children vacationed on the same island months earlier in March 2016.

Dawson found the Trudeaus' visit to the island — and the prime minister hopping aboard the Aga Khan's private helicopter to get there — broke sections of the Conflict of Interest Act that prohibits a minister or any member of their family from accepting gifts or "advantages" that could reasonably be seen as influencing government decisions.

Moreover, she found Trudeau didn't properly recuse himself on two occasions in May 2016 from private meetings about the Aga Khan and a $15-million grant to the billionaire philanthropist's endowment fund of the Global Centre for Pluralism.
https://www.thespec.com/news-story/8017 ... thics-law/

But, he is not going to resign.

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A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


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Unread postPosted: February 28th, 2019, 4:59 pm 
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Obviously Trudeau is not taking this seriously just like he doesn't take raising taxes, job killing regulations, and encouraging illegal border crossings effect on Canadians.

By Anthony Furey of Sun News Media.

The unbearable lightness of Justin Trudeau

How on earth would he spin it? Forget spin. How on earth can he survive this? After watching Jody Wilson-Rybould’s calm, composed, lengthy and detailed damning testimony against Justin Trudeau, it was hard to imagine the PM would have anything to say in response besides staring at the cameras like a deer in the headlights.

Yet there he was, not long after the the Justice Committee hearing had wrapped up, waltzing into a media availability in Quebec to celebrate the new Liberal MP elected during the Wednesday by-elections.

He was all smiles, and even the occasional smirk, as he swatted aside everything, not a care in the world.

The testimony of JWR - as she’s become known as - was damning. The first 90 seconds were a bombshell, painting a scene worse than even Trudeau’s harshest critics had guessed.

She claims she was aggressively and repeatedly lobbied by the PM, senior staff in the PMO, the Clerk of the Privy Council, and others. “This included in-person conversations, telephone calls, emails, and text messages,” she said.

It continued even though she told them that she was not going to interfere with the prosecution of SNC-Lavalin. They kept on her, repeatedly nagging her. Even after she told them to stop pestering her about it. Even after she told them she felt it was inappropriate pressure.

“I needed everyone to stop talking to me about SNC because I’d made up my mind and the engagements were inappropriate,” she says she told Gerald Butts at one meeting. Butts, she states, shrugged this off and kept at it.

So it’s not that once or twice Trudeau or someone close to him briefly stepped across the line by improperly pressuring her to drop the charges. It’s that they applied the full court press on her for an extended period of time.

The big problem with that, aside from the fact that it contradicts Trudeau’s previous claims that all this was “false”, is that these actions - by Trudeau and others - certainly sound like they contravene Section 139 of the Criminal Code, concerning obstruction of justice.

But Trudeau didn’t seem phased when he took to the podium Wednesday evening. He admitted he hadn’t seen all of her testimony (then why comment on it?!) but had no problem labelling JWR a liar.

"I completely disagree with the former Attorney General’s characterization of events,” Trudeau said, with a smile. Of course he’d set us up for this denial. On Tuesday he said it was important for JWR to testify so she could “share her perspective.” Not facts. Not, as she put, her truth. But her perspective. And now he says her perspective was the wrong one.

Zero apology. Zero regret. Instead he proudly urged Canadians to have faith in the ethics commissioner, who has opened an investigation into this affair. And, yes, that would be the same ethics commissioner who simply doles out fines to the tune of $200 if someone has been found to break a law.

Trudeau says he welcomes that process. (Will he say the same about the RCMP investigation that is no doubt soon to commence?)

Before stepping away form the mic, he got in one of his now regularly occurring digs about the Conservatives “dividing” people, as if that shield would work this time around.

But based on his composure, the look on his face, how he was cockier than usual - it seems Justin Trudeau really does think this will all soon go away.

That’s the part, his attitude, that makes this whole saga so hard to bear.

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A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


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Unread postPosted: March 1st, 2019, 10:43 am 
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Trudeau denies, and deflects.

5 things ... we learned from Wilson-Raybould at the justice committee:

1. Wilson-raybould said there were at least 10 phone calls and 10 different meetings, as well as several text messages, about the Snc-lavalin case, between her or senior members of her staff and 11 people in the Prime Minister’s Office and other departments, between Sept. 4, 2018 and Dec. 18, 2018. One meeting was between her and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. She said she was concerned immediately about what she viewed as pressure to overturn the decision not to negotiate a remediation agreement with Snc-lavalin but that her concerns were heightened as the calls and meetings continued even after she said she had made up he mind.

2. Wilson-raybould was informed on Sept. 4 the director of public prosecutions decided not to pursue a remediation agreement with Snc-lavalin, and to continue with a criminal prosecution. She said by Sept. 16 she had made up her mind she would not overrule the director’s decision or take over the prosecution herself. Wilson-raybould said it wouldn’t be appropriate to discuss why she made the decision, due to ongoing court cases in the matter. Wilson-raybould said she felt once she had made up her mind, it was inappropriate to have further conversations on the matter.

3. The conversation Wilson-raybould had with Trudeau on Sept. 17 alarmed her when he talked about Snclavalin’s importance in Quebec, and the fact he is a Quebec MP. She believed that distracted from appropriate concerns in considering a remediation agreement, such as saving the jobs of innocent people. She asked if he was interfering in her role as an independent attorney general and that she would strongly advise against that. She said Trudeau said, “No, no, no, we just need to find a solution.”

4. Wilson-raybould believed Privy Council clerk Michael Wernick was issuing “veiled threats” to her in a phone call they had on Dec. 19, 2018, in which he told her Trudeau was still concerned and wanted to know why a deferred-prosecution agreement wasn’t being pursued.

5. The Liberal MPS on the committee asked Wilsonraybould many times why, if she had so many concerns about being improperly pressured, she didn’t resign earlier as attorney general. Wilson-raybould responded she was doing her job and upholding the integrity of the office. She told the committee if a directive to proceed to a deferred prosecution had been made while she was the veterans-affairs minister, she would have resigned from cabinet immediately. She did end up resigning on Feb. 12 but said she could not say why, saying an order freeing her from obligations of cabinet confidentiality and solicitor-client privilege did not extend to the period after she was no longer the attorney general.

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A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


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Unread postPosted: March 1st, 2019, 2:42 pm 
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Justine puts pressure on the AG to interfere on behalf of SNC-Lavalin to win votes in Quebec. The company uses money(possibly from federal contracts) to buy hookers for Gadaffi's son and suddenly our feminist pm is fighting for Canadian jobs. ac_lmfao

https://dailycaller.com/2019/03/01/trud ... dium=email
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau equated the procurement of prostitutes as one way his government can “stand up for Canadian jobs,” in a Wednesday Question Period exchange with the Official Opposition Conservatives.

In response to a question from Conservative immigration critic Michelle Rempel about a report that the embattled Quebec contractor SNC-Lavalin paid $30,000 (CND) to entertain Muammar Gaddafi’s son with prostitutes, Trudeau appeared to not only confirm the story; he also tried to exonerate the company.

Referring to the “$30,000 worth of Canadian prostitutes that were given to Muammar Gaddafi’s son,” Rempel noted “this is the so-called victimless crime that our quote ‘feminist’ prime minister is moving mountains to cover up. When did the prime minister learn that SNC-Lavalin paid for prostitutes for Muammar Gaddafi’s son?”

Trudeau answered, “Every step of the way, we will stand up for Canadians workers, we will stand up for Canadian jobs right across this country and we will do so in a way that is consistent with our values …

Rempel told The Daily Caller on Friday that she was shocked at Trudeau’s response to her question.

“He needs to resign,” she said. “He’s a disgusting failure that no longer has the moral authority to govern. He needs to go.”

If SNC-Lavalin is convicted on fraud charges, it will automatically make the company ineligible to apply for lucrative federal government building contracts for at least 10 years.

On Friday, Trudeau again shuffled his cabinet in order to replace the vacancy left by Wilson-Raybould, who resigned as Veterans Affairs minister after having lost the attorney general portfolio.

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Unread postPosted: March 1st, 2019, 6:20 pm 
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China is having fun with Trudeau's SNC scandal in light of he Huawel CFO being held. The government said the judiciary is independent and cannot be interfered with. Apparently that's not true if the government is trying to buy votes in Quebec.

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Unread postPosted: March 1st, 2019, 7:22 pm 
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Unread postPosted: March 1st, 2019, 7:24 pm 
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I didn't like Harper, but a recycled shoe is an improvement over Trudeau.
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“No issue better illustrates the divide between America’s working class and America’s political class than illegal immigration- Donald J. Trump.


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Unread postPosted: March 1st, 2019, 7:53 pm 
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“No issue better illustrates the divide between America’s working class and America’s political class than illegal immigration- Donald J. Trump.


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Unread postPosted: March 1st, 2019, 8:05 pm 
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Unread postPosted: March 1st, 2019, 9:21 pm 
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iron horse jockey wrote:
I didn't like Harper, but a recycled shoe is an improvement over Trudeau.
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I remember that.

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Unread postPosted: March 3rd, 2019, 9:14 pm 
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This is Justin Trudeau as a child.
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Unread postPosted: March 5th, 2019, 1:14 pm 
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It has been a terrible week for poor Justin. He's trying to divert by talking about climate change and blaming former pm Harper. I hope the clouds continue until the election in October.

Lavscam, Mark Norman and Huawei — a troubling trio

If we only had one news story in Canadian politics right now that called into question the partiality of our justice system, that would be bad enough. But right now we have three. And they’re all unfolding at the same time.

There are so many moving parts to the ongoing Lavscam scandal that it can be hard to wade through it all and figure out what’s really the problem. The Liberal message machine is clearly looking to exploit this confusion, arguing that this is all really just a story about how they’re responsibly trying to save jobs.

If only. What it is, is a story about how a justice system that is supposed to be free from political interference saw a months-long concerted effort on the part of the Prime Minister’s Office to get the former attorney general to drop charges against a company because it would be both good for that company, which lobbied them and donated to their campaign, and also good for the Liberals’ own electoral prospects.

Or so the highly credible Jody Wilson-raybould says. Gerald Butts, who resigned from the PMO in the lead-up to JWR’S testimony, will himself be appearing before the Justice Committee on Wednesday morning to tell his version of events, which will presumably refute some of her statement.

Even if all of this ends today, and Butts sufficiently muddies the waters such that the RCMP opt not to charge anyone and we all just go home puzzled but placated, the mere perception that political interference happened but didn’t technically cross the threshold of being a criminal offence is still an awful thing for Canada to endure.

There are voices trying to argue that this is a non-story because there were no brown paper envelopes passed. That is true.

But an expose about personal graft, while awful, is not as bad as learning that our justice system can operate on the whims of a political leader.

It means not only could politicians press prosecutors to not charge people for political reasons, but it means maybe they’d also push to have people charged for political reasons. Enter Mark Norman.

This line of thinking plays prominently in the defence case for Norman, the former head of the Navy who is facing one charge of breach of trust.

Top lawyer Marie Henein is reportedly preparing a motion to have the case dismissed based on alleged political interference and is seeking notes, texts and emails from within the PMO to prove her case.

If this proves true in the Norman case and then the worst of Lavscam is also proven true, then we have two cases of the PMO attempting to direct the justice system. It’s not quite a trend. But it’s getting there. It certainly makes you wonder if there are others.

This is not what happens — what shouldn’t happen — in a country like Canada.

It’s for those other countries, those shady countries you read about that aren’t liberal democracies and where their leaders regularly get shipped off to jail for corruption.

This brings us to the third in this troubling trio, Huawei: Last week, a Chinese government official mused that if Canada is apparently bending the rules for Snc-lavalin, then why not do it for their prized technology company?

And then, seeing all of this, other companies lobby for their pet issues.

And so on and so on. This stuff just doesn’t happen in Canada ... until it does.

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Unread postPosted: March 5th, 2019, 1:30 pm 

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iron horse jockey wrote:
Image


Ironically, Stephen Harper was once a Liberal party member in his youth:

Image

http://bp2.blogger.com/_5g8i0GwEwjg/Rxz ... utlook.jpg

In high school he worshipped Justin Trudeau’s dad, Pierre. PET was Harper’s idol. Did you know thst IHJ? I bet you didn’t.

Harper was as close to being a ‘Trudeamaniac’ as anyone could become.


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Unread postPosted: March 5th, 2019, 1:33 pm 
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Ronald Reagan was once a Democrat.


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Unread postPosted: March 5th, 2019, 7:14 pm 
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:thumbup:
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Unread postPosted: March 6th, 2019, 8:38 am 
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Ottawa along with it's deputies out in Alberta and BC have deliberately chased away tens of billions of dollars in investment and over 100,000 high paying jobs. The US, on the other had has encouraged investment and job creation. Canada cannot afford four more years of Trudeau and his enviro extremist puppeteer Gerald Butts.

By ASHLEY STEDMAN and ELMIRA ALIAKBARI — Ashley Stedman is a senior policy analyst and Elmira Aliakbari is the associate director of natural-resource studies at the Fraser Institute.

Fed policies made Canada less attractive to investors

It’s hard not to recognize that Canada — and Alberta — have become less-appealing places to do business in recent years. Last month another foreign oil company, U.S.-based Devon Energy, announced plans to exit the oilsands. The company is leaving Canada to complete its “transformation to a high-return U.S. oil growth business.”

Devon is just the latest energy company to sell its oilsands assets.

Several foreign companies such as Arkansas-based Murphy Oil, Houston-based Conoco Phillips and France’s Total SA have already reduced their ownership in the oilsands in recent years.

The fact that these companies are leaving Canada is not surprising given that the federal and several provincial governments have made it more expensive — and in some cases, outright inhospitable — to do business here.

Meanwhile, the United States has adopted policies to attract business investment. According to the 2018 Global Petroleum Survey, which tracks the perceptions of investors based on policies such a taxes and regulations, the U.S. is the most attractive region for oil and gas investment worldwide while Canada ranks fourth (behind Europe and Australia).

Specifically, nine of the world’s top 10 jurisdictions are located in the U.S. while none of th
e Canadian jurisdictions made the global top 10.

Interestingly, the 2018 Annual Survey of Mining Companies, which polls mining investors, also reflects the U.S. advantage over Canada. The U.S. is the most attractive region based on its policies in 2018, up from third place the previous year.

So what’s behind strong investor confidence for many U.S. states?

The results from the petroleum survey show that oil and gas investors view positively the regulatory environment South of the border. In particular, more than half of the U.S. jurisdictions significantly improved their labour regulations and addressed regulatory duplication from 2017 to 2018. Meanwhile, on the regulation front, respondents indicated worsening performance for many Canadian jurisdictions.

To better understand why Canada has declined in the eyes of energy investors, consider how some recent policy decisions vary between countries. For instance, in Canada, the reforms introduced by the Trudeau government under Bill C-69 (currently under Senate review) will likely make the regulatory approval process more complicated and less certain. This bill also includes subjective assessment criteria—including the social impact of energy investment and its “gender” implications—which will likely further politicize the regulatory process and lengthen approval times.

To make matters worse, the federal government has also failed to expand pipeline capacity, which has severely depressed Canadian oil prices. In fact, Ottawa was forced to nationalize Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline in a last-ditch effort to add pipeline capacity. But that plan is also in limbo as the federal government grapples with a Federal Court of Appeal ruling. Meanwhile, the Trump administration has rescinded or scaled back several Obama-era regulations including limits on hydraulic fracturing on federal lands. The U.S. has also moved away from carbon-pricing and introduced sweeping corporate tax cuts meant to attract and encourage business investment.

Despite these worrying survey results, Ottawa and many provincial governments seem reluctant to acknowledge the fact that investment in the energy industry — and the related jobs and economic opportunities — are moving south.

To reverse this trend, policymakers should streamline regulations and restore investor confidence, for the benefit of Albertans, Canadians and the country at large.

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A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


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Unread postPosted: March 8th, 2019, 1:46 pm 
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PM’S mea culpas a sorry sight
Trudeau apologizes for everything except his own failings

Funny, isn’t it, how Justin Trudeau is sorry about anything — everything — that happened before he became prime minister. Every other week he seems to be off apologizing for some perceived wrong that happened 80 years ago, 100, 150 years ago. But does he ever apologize for any of the flubs and blunders (or worse) that he is responsible for?

In other words, he only ever apologizes for the easy stuff; for the stuff that will make him look good with no skin off his nose.

So it was no surprise Thursday when Trudeau held a news conference over the Snc-lavalin scandal and never once said “sorry.”

He has apologized to the passengers of the M.S. Saint Louis, a German boat full of Jewish refugees who were refused safe haven in Canada. The refugees returned to Germany where 254 of the 907 aboard died in Nazi concentration camps.

Trudeau has also apologized to the Sikh refugees on the Komagato Maru, a Japanese ship that attempted to land in 1914. They, too, were denied entry into Canada and on their return to India 20 of the 352 turned back were killed.

Our PM has apologized to the LGBTQ2 community for its members’ past exclusion from the civil service. And, of course, Trudeau has offered apologies to Indigenous groups for residential schools, forced relocations and the execution of six B.C. Tsilhqot’in chiefs in 1864.

If that kind of revisionist regret truly moves you, I’d like to apologize to any Italian readers for the cruel way the Visigoth King Alaric sacked Rome in 410 AD.

Probably some or all of Trudeau’s apologies were welcomed by survivors or their descendants. Perhaps his words even brought a measure of healing.

But the one common theme between Trudeau’s endless string of official regrets and his Snc-lavalin newser on Thursday is that the PM is really good at apologizing for stuff other people have done, but not so good at saying sorry for what he and his government have done — his trip to a private Bahamian island, his groping of a young reporter in B.C.’S Kokanee region two decades ago, his embarrassing trip to India, his sanctimonious “mansplaining” to an Edmonton student that the correct word is “peoplekind,” not “mankind,” and his dismantling of our relations with China and Saudi Arabia.

When an apology is truly Trudeau’s to give, he is as tight-lipped as they come.

Now consider one more take-away from Trudeau’s Snc-lavalin news conference. Time and again, the PM said his government was justified in repeatedly pressuring then-attorney General Jody Wilson-raybould to reconsider giving the Montreal engineering firm a free pass in court because saving SNC was in the “national interest.”

Is saving SNC more in the national interest than saving Alberta’s oil and gas industry by building a pipeline or three? If the effort Trudeau has put into the SNC file versus the effort he has put into cancelling pipelines is any yardstick, you would have to say “yes,” in Trudeau’s mind saving 8,900 Quebec jobs is more important to the country than saving 160,000 Alberta ones.

Indeed, you have to think the Trudeau Liberals have singled out Alberta’s energy industry on purpose.

A Liberal law (Bill C-48) currently before the Senate, for instance, would ban tanker traffic off B.C.’S north coast. But it would not cover all oceangoing tankers. Tankers carrying B.C. liquified natural gas would be okay. Just tankers carrying oil, which comes mostly from Alberta, would be restricted. Eleven of the most senior politicians and bureaucrats in Ottawa risked bending the law and Parliamentary ethics to help SNC. However, when it comes to Alberta oil, the same people insist on the strictest interpretation of every environmental and Indigenous law and regulation.

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A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


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Unread postPosted: March 8th, 2019, 7:15 pm 
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