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Unread postPosted: October 26th, 2019, 10:28 am 
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One way old Justine could soothe separatist anger here on the prairies is to suspend these two provinces from his carbon cash grab. At least until one pipeline is built.

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Unread postPosted: October 27th, 2019, 11:10 am 
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Expect Trudeau to double down on it's anti prairie province agenda.

By Lorne Gunter of Sun News Media

TRUDEAU HUMBLED? NOPE
Based on his father’s minority in the ’70s, expect him to double down on lefty initiatives

Now what?

Now that Justin Trudeau and the Liberals have been returned to power, will they govern more humbly? After all, they lost a million votes from 2015, received the lowest percentage of the popular vote of any winning party in Canadian history, finished second in popular votes to the Tories and, of course, lost their majority.

So they’ll be chastened, right? They’ll learn from the many, many mistakes of their first term and from voters’ disgruntlement, won’t they?

They’ll cap or maybe even scale back their carbon tax. They’ll try harder to balance the budget and jettison a foreign policy that focuses on preaching to other countries about Canada’s moral superiority and permitting the prime minister to go on Mr. Dressup tours to foreign capitals.

Surely they’ll be more receptive to the country’s largest export industry — energy — and less “green” in all things?

Not on your life.

If the last Liberal minority held in place by a leftist party (1972-74) is any precedent, expect these Liberals to go even farther left; first because they will believe they need to to stay in power and, second, because the PM would have been further to the left from the start had he thought he could get away with it.

Of course, the last time a Lib minority was propped up by the NDP was 47 years ago when Justin’s father, Pierre, was prime minister. It was one of the most socialist periods ever in Canada.

The Liberals veered hard left to keep the NDP voting with the government in Parliament. And the Libs in the ’70s took a sharp left turn because that’s really what they wanted to do all along, anyway.

Major foreign investment became subject to bureaucratic and political review and approval. Canadian content rules on radio and TV determined what Canadians could listen to or watch. Federal spending jumped 27% in just two budgets (even after accounting for inflation and population growth). Inflation more than doubled and the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX) lost nearly 15% of its value.

The TSX retreat wasn’t a huge political issue back then because stocks weren’t so widely held.

But leftward careening by the Liberals this time could send every RSP and public pension fund down, down, down.

Already in the last three years, Liberal hostility to oil and gas has driven away over $100 billion in investment from Canada. Investors will be even more likely to avoid us if the new Trudeau government gets cozy with the NDP and Greens and does things, like, cancel the Trans Mountain pipeline.

During the campaign, the Liberals promised to ramp up spending all on their own. But given that the NDP promised to spend at least $100 billion more than the Liberals, expect the federal government to become

much bigger and much, much more expensive under this Liberal minority.

At the NDP’S election-night rally, the crowd chanted “Tax the rich! Tax the rich!” Never mind that the crowd was made up disproportionately of teachers, nurses, social workers, civil service managers and other people in the top 10% of income earners. (Without recognizing it, the crowd were themselves the “rich” they so resented.)

So expect a lot more taxes to pay for some of the new spending — the rest to be funded by borrowing.

And when the federal carbon tax inevitably fails to rein in emissions, expect even more punitive, job-killing “green” taxes and regulations.

There will be more ideological litmus tests for government grants (not just for Christian summer camps) and the bear of Western alienation will be poked in the eye, again and again.

So, now what? The answer is everything you disliked about the Liberals in their first term will now be magnified.

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Unread postPosted: November 1st, 2019, 10:38 am 
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Five years of Trudeau in Ottawa and Notley in Alberta and the legacy is lost jobs, investment and tax dollars. There won't be an oil and gas sector in Canada in twenty years. We will import everything.

ONE MORE BLOW
ENERGY GIANT ENCANA MOVES HEAD OFFICE TO THE U.S.

CALGARY — Described as a “tragedy” in a downtrodden industry, one of Canada’s oldest and largest energy companies Encana Corp. is dropping Canada from its name and moving to the United States to attract more investors.

“Make no mistake, we have a long and proud history in Canada and our assets here are world-class,” Encana president and CEO Doug Suttles said on an investor call Thursday morning, where he announced what many in Calgary had long feared — the company’s headquarters was moving to the U.S. and the iconic company would be renamed Ovintiv Inc.

But industry observers see it as another symbolic blow to the Canadian oilpatch that’s been broadsided by stringent regulations, transport constraints and opposition from climate activists over the past decade.

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney said the combination of federal laws around new pipeline development and rhetoric about phasing out the energy industry had created “an inhospitable environment” for companies like Encana and exacerbated the underperformance of the Canadian energy sector.

“What we’ve seen in the last five years is companies from Kinder Morgan to now Encana have taken the hint,” Kenney said, adding the country has seen an exodus of foreign capital.

Texas-based Kinder Morgan Inc. sold its Trans Mountain pipeline and expansion project to the federal government last year for $4.5 billion after being stuck in a regulatory quagmire for years. The company then sold off its remaining assets in Canada to Pembina Pipeline Corp. this year.

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A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


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Unread postPosted: November 1st, 2019, 10:46 am 
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The Trudeau regime's war on the prairie economies has a negative impact on climate change.

By Lorne Gunter of Sun News Media

ENCANA EXITS
No surprise company leaving Alberta after Trudeau’s anti-oil gov’t re-elected

There is no coincidence at all that Encana — once the country’s largest company — announced it’s moving its headquarters to the United States a little more than a week after Justin Trudeau won re-election.

Similarly, it’s no coincidence that Husky Energy announced major layoffs and dramatically reduced capital spending the morning after the Liberals secured a second term, albeit with a minority. The federal Liberals are the most anti-development, anti-oil government of any major oil-producing country on earth — and that’s not an exaggeration. Canada still has the third-largest proven oil reserves on the planet. The world still has a growing need for fossil fuels and will for at least another 30 years. The product and markets are there. The only thing standing in the way is the Trudeau Liberals and their obsession with “green” fantasies. (And to a lesser extent, the Quebec and B.C. governments.)

Canada is struggling as an oil and gas nation entirely because of politics.

The Yale University environmental performance index ranks Canada as the No. 1 environmental country among major oil-producers
. And yet that gets us nowhere with the Liberals.

The world will consume oil whether they get it from us or not. The problem is, if they get it from just about anywhere else, more emissions will be created and more environmental damage done.

Were the Liberals truly concerned about global emissions, they would be pushing for more pipelines to take more Canadian oil and gas to more markets. That would reduce worldwide emissions as our more environmentally conscious energy displaced dirtier energy from elsewhere.

Instead, in their virtue-signalling world, the Liberals are insisting Canada do the equivalent of donning a hair shirt and flagellating itself in the name of saving the planet.

The Liberals are imposing punishing eco taxes and obstructing new pipelines and oilsands projects in an attempt to “phase out” the energy sector but the irony is this approach will add to worldwide emissions.

It won’t stop the climate “crisis,” but it has the potential to destroy Alberta and hobble the national economy.

The re-election of the Liberals under Trudeau is viewed in much of the West (outside Vancouver) as a direct attack on our region and its No. 1 industry (which also happens to be the country’s No. 1 export commodity).

Of course, if the Liberals want to prove they are not anti-oil, they have to do more to get the Trans Mountain pipeline built — like mount a defence in court to First Nations appeals and stand up to blockading protesters. But here’s another tangible way.

On Thursday, Teck Resources’ $20-billion Frontier oilsands mine entered the “public comments” phase of environmental approval.

So far, federal and provincial regulators have given their blessing. Now, the public — but mostly activists — have three weeks to express their opinions. Then, the project goes to the Trudeau cabinet, which has until February to say “Yes” or “No.” Over Frontier’s 40-year lifespan, it would pump about $70 billion into the Canadian economy, create more than 90,000 person-years of employment (about 30% of that in provinces other than Alberta), as well as raising about $12 billion in tax revenue for the federal government.

Teck Resources has signed deals with all 14 Dene, Cree and Metis nations and communities in the area. It has even planned its mining and reclamation efforts to ensure it does not disrupt the endangered Ronald Lake bison herd.

Ottawa can approve Frontier without directly upsetting Quebec and British Columbia, the way a pipeline might.

About the only people who would be upset by Frontier going ahead would be eco-activists and Indigenous dissidents. If the Trudeau Liberals, then, can’t even approve Frontier, the West will truly know the fix is in and Encana won’t be the only one bugging out.

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A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


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Unread postPosted: November 4th, 2019, 1:05 pm 
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Unread postPosted: November 7th, 2019, 3:03 am 
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Canadians have little faith in PM’S economic plan: Poll

Justin Trudeau is beginning his second term in a precarious position when it comes to his economic agenda.

Only 22% of Canadians showed strong confidence in the prime minister’s ability to create conditions for economic prosperity, according to a poll by Nanos Research Group for Bloomberg News. About 30% of respondents expressed no confidence, with 47% somewhere in between on the question.

It’s a particularly low level of trust among the electorate for a leader just coming off a fresh election victory.

The result lies in stark contrast to the honeymoon-like expectations that greeted Trudeau’s rise to power four years ago, when his Liberal Party pledged to deliver economic change through deficit-financed tax cuts and benefits to the middle class.

The survey suggests Canadians may be questioning whether that doctrine — on which the Liberals doubled down during this year’s campaign — will be able to solve the nation’s biggest economic challenges and produce more growth.

“Considering we just came off a federal election, you would expect Canadians would have a lot more confidence in the winner,” said Nik Nanos, chairman of Nanos Research. “There is no real optimism the Liberals can create prosperity.”

Factoring into that concern may be Trudeau’s failure to secure a majority in parliament.

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Unread postPosted: November 8th, 2019, 4:20 am 
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New federal government must ease burden on Canada’s energy sector

Two weeks after the federal election, it’s easy to understand why many Albertans and Saskatchewanians, especially those in (or affected by) the energy sector, are frustrated.

More than 100,000 workers have been laid off (including recent layoffs at Husky in Calgary) and expectations for recovery are weak with new pipelines miles away — literally.

Consequently, energy producers can’t deliver their product to market.

Oil and gas investment is moving south of the border; just this week, exploration company Encana announced plans to leave Calgary for the United States where federal reforms have made the energy industry more attractive.

Between 2016 and 2018, the U.S. enjoyed a more than twoand-a-half times increase in investment in upstream oil and gas (essentially, exploration and production) compared to Canada.

Moreover, a recent Bank of Canada survey of business leaders found that the outlook in energy-producing regions remains grim, and that regional differences across the country are more pronounced.

Specifically, while survey respondents in Central Canada and British Columbia reported robust plans to expand their workforces, there were limited plans to hire in energy-producing regions.

When asked about plans to invest in the next 12 months, respondents reported healthy investment intentions — outside the Prairies.

While many businesses in the Prairies reported that regulation and uncertainty are stifling investment plans.

This all adds up to a serious problem for Western Canada and the entire country.

Unfortunately, this widespread negative sentiment in energy-producing regions is not surprising in light of recent developments.

Bill C-69, which overhauled Canada’s federal environmental review process, will make the approval process for major energy projects even more subjective and uncertain.

The bill, passed into law earlier this year, raises serious questions about whether future pipeline projects will ever be built due to increased costs and uncertainty.

Similarly, Bill C-48, which bans large oil tankers off B.C.’S northern coast, represents another barrier to exporting Canadian oil to Asian markets where oil commands a higher price.

And of course, our energy sector continues to suffer from insufficient pipeline capacity as new pipeline projects have been cancelled or delayed (see Trans Mountain).

This lack of pipeline capacity has severely hampered the ability of oil producers to reach customers beyond North America and has greatly reduced the price Canadian producers receive for their products.

The pipeline pinch reached a crisis point last November when Canadian heavy crude (WCS) traded at only about 30% of U.S. crude (WTI).

According to a recent study, insufficient pipeline capacity cost Canada’s energy sector $20.6 billion — or 1% of Canada’s economy — in foregone revenues in 2018 alone.

The problems facing Canada’s energy sector are real and unlikely to be resolved any time soon, despite some glimmers of hope at the provincial level (such as the Alberta government’s corporate tax reduction).

To help turn things around, the Trudeau government must enact major policy changes and ease the regulatory burden on Canada’s energy sector, and ensure the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion gets built.

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A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


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Unread postPosted: November 12th, 2019, 5:23 pm 
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Unread postPosted: November 12th, 2019, 9:03 pm 
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Herman wrote:
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We know he is a corrupt scumbag. That is why Canadians reelected him.

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Unread postPosted: November 14th, 2019, 10:08 am 
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Trudeau is not a team player. I have very little confidence in the next parliament to do anything other than increase the deficit, carbon taxes and job destroying regulations.

By Lorrie Goldstein of Sun News Media

Trudeau must choose approach to governing with a minority

The success of Canada’s new minority Parliament, which will convene on Dec. 5, depends not on the opposition leaders but on Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

Canadians collectively decided on Oct. 21 that they still wanted Trudeau to be their PM, but not with the extraordinary power of a PM with a majority government.

Given this, Trudeau can choose one of two paths which are, ironically, defined by two conservative leaders.

The first is Joe Clark, and the federal Progressive Conservative minority government he led which lasted just nine months from June, 1979 to March, 1980, because Clark announced and then ran his minority government as if he had a majority.

The second is Bill Davis, leader of two Progressive Conservative minority governments as premier of Ontario for six years from 1975 to 1981, because he understood that a minority government is fundamentally different from a majority one.

If Trudeau cares about his political legacy he should consider these two examples.

Clark’s short-lived minority government fell to Liberal leader Pierre Trudeau, who came out of retirement following his 1979 election loss to Clark, to again serve as Canada’s PM, winning a majority for four more years from 1980 to 1984, before retiring.

In total, Trudeau was PM for 15 years, from 1968 to 1979 and 1980 to 1984.

By contrast, Clark never became PM again following his defeat in 1980 on a non-confidence motion over his budget, which included an unpopular 4 cents per litre (18 cents per gallon) gasoline tax.

Davis, on the other hand, who won his first majority government from 1971 to 1975, was then reduced to two minority governments, the first from 1975 to 1977, the second from 1977 to 1981.

He then recaptured a majority government and presided over Ontario politics for four more years until 1985 when he retired, having served as premier for 14 consecutive years from 1971 to 1985.

Davis was successful as the leader of two minority governments, because he understood the message voters had sent him.

He was a pragmatist rather than an ideologue and, admittedly in a different era, viewed his opponents as wrong, but not evil, when he disagreed with them.

Because of this, Davis was able to find common ground without formal agreements with the opposition Liberals and NDP on an issue-by-issue basis, for his six years as leader of a minority government.

Thus he was able to pass his legislative program which, mindful of what voters had collectively told him they wanted, was a Red Tory agenda rather than a red meat conservative one, including such measures as rent controls.

The measure of Trudeau as the leader of a minority government will not be whether he says he understands the message voters sent him on Oct. 21, but whether he acts in a way that shows he understands it.

Trudeau will have many opportunities to do the things he says he wants to do, such as building the TMX pipeline, by working with the Conservatives, and moving forward with his carbon tax by working with the NDP, BQ and Greens.

Or he can govern as if he has a majority and we’ll be back at the polls in a year of so — which, using a modern example — Conservative PM Stephen Harper avoided after winning minority governments in 2006 and 2008, before achieving a majority from 2011 to 2015.

The choice is Trudeau’s. We’ll soon know what he does with it.

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Unread postPosted: November 14th, 2019, 11:15 am 
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Groups under the TIDES umbrella helped elect Trudeau in 2015.

From Huffington Post

Canadian Oil Industry Blames 'Foreign Funded Radical Environmental Groups' For Job Losses

Canadian oil and gas drillers will have shed more than 13,700 jobs between 2018 and 2020 as an industry slump continues, an oil drillers’ group has warned in a new forecast that criticizes both the federal Liberal government and environmental activists.

The Canadian Association of Oilwell Drilling Contractors (CAODC) singled out federal legislation that it says stands in the industry’s way, including Bill C-48, which bans tanker traffic on British Columbia’s north coast, and Bill C-69, which set up a stricter approval process for energy infrastructure projects.

“It has been another extremely difficult year for our members,” CAODC president and CEO Mark Scholz said in a statement.

“The attacks from foreign funded, radical environmental groups, and punitive policy measures from our own federal government have caused Canadian oil and gas families to suffer unnecessarily.”

The report said that “sentiment toward Canadian oil and gas is nearing all-time lows” following October’s federal election, which saw the governing Liberals reduced to a minority that may have to rely on the support of parties that oppose oil infrastructure expansion.

The report estimates that the industry has foregone $30 billion in foreign capital since 2017. It says it expects a total of nine more wells to be drilled next year, taking the total number to 4,905.

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A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


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Unread postPosted: November 17th, 2019, 2:57 pm 
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What does Justine's invitation to illegals cost Canadians?

https://tnc.news/2019/03/18/how-much-ha ... aebQ6R-ekA
Since Prime Minister Trudeau tweeted an open invitation to the world’s migrants, thousands have accepted the invitation.

Rather than securing our borders or even discouraging migrants from crossing into Canada illegally, the Canadian government has allowed thousands of migrants entry into Canada. 2% of illegal border crossers have been deported.

As a result, in order to accommodate the illegal border crossers, Canadian taxpayers are on the hook for billions of dollars.

This report is intended for Canadian taxpayers to keep track of the costs:

In Budget 2019, the government allotted $283 million in new spending intended on covering the healthcare costs of the recent influx of illegal border crossers.

In Budget 2019, the government announced $1.18 billion “to support implementation of the Border Enforcement Strategy, and to process 50,000 asylum claims per year, as well as to facilitate removal of failed asylum claimants in a timely manner”

According to the non-partisan Parliamentary Budget Officer, processing illegal border crossers alone will exceed $1.1 billion this year.

The RCMP has spent over $6.6 million in overtime and maintaining a satellite office for processing illegal border crossers.

Since 2016, the Canadian Border Services Agency has deported seven people using chartered flights, costing taxpayers a total of $821,157

The 2018 federal budget devoted $173.2 million over two years to support intake of illegal border crossers

43 residents near Roxham Road are eligible for a total of $375,000 in compensation for increase in traffic and “disturbances”

On June 1st, 2018, the federal government pledged $50 million in aid for provinces and municipalities affected by illegal migrants

On July 16th, 2018, the Liberals announce that $11 million in aid will go directly to the city of Toronto to compensate for housing and shelter shortages due to illegal migrants

At the start of 2019, the federal government revealed a plan to give the provinces another $114 million in extra funds to deal with the situation

On January 25th, 2019, the federal government provided the city of Toronto with an additional $15 million to address shelter shortages due to illegal border crossers

The government has committed $6 million to provide temporary housing to asylum seekers in British Columbia.

Manitoba to get $5 million more to house illegal border crossers, in addition to the $3 million Manitoba received in 2018.

Government sinks $50 million into holding facility for illegal border crossers.

Quebec will be receiving $250 million from the federal government for the costs of handling illegal border crossers from 2017 to 2018.

The Department of Immigration transferred a total of $372 million to provincial and municipal governments to cover the costs provinces and cities have incurred because of illegal migration.

North York shelter for asylum-seekers will cost taxpayers $1 million per month: report

Canadians spent nearly $11.4 million to cover additional policing and enforcement costs attributed to the asylum seeker problem.

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Unread postPosted: November 17th, 2019, 3:17 pm 
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Unread postPosted: November 17th, 2019, 5:10 pm 
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Herman wrote:
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October's election results are bad news for the Canadian economy.

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Unread postPosted: November 17th, 2019, 5:46 pm 
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Herman wrote:
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We are doomed.

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Unread postPosted: November 19th, 2019, 6:37 pm 
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prairie redneck.


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Unread postPosted: November 19th, 2019, 6:52 pm 
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Unread postPosted: November 20th, 2019, 5:50 pm 
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Justin Trudeau announced his new cabinet today.
ac_boring

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Unread postPosted: November 20th, 2019, 6:31 pm 
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Unread postPosted: November 21st, 2019, 6:25 pm 
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Justine is a piece of shit.

https://tnc.news/2019/11/20/canada-side ... 9fjXXQXPs0
Canada sides with North Korea in UN resolution condemning Israel
The resolution, calling for the self-determination of Palestinians living in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, condemns Israel as “occupiers” of a Palestinian state.

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