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Unread postPosted: November 22nd, 2019, 7:16 pm 
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One of the many notes to Liberal leader Justin Trudeau in the article:

" More than any other issue, the clash between your global warming pretensions and desire to play Galahad on the world stage has been at the expense of the West and has stimulated more grievance and resentment within the Confederation than we have seen in decades. "
https://nationalpost.com/…/rex-murphy-forget-the-cabinet-sh…

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Unread postPosted: November 23rd, 2019, 5:13 am 
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Now that Ford has abandoned smaller government and balanced budgets, his new bestie is JT.

Trudeau has ‘evolved’
Ford stresses national unity after meeting with PM

TORONTO — Ontario Premier Doug Ford came away from a meeting with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau confident they can work together on transit and other infrastructure, health care and economic development.

Ford told the Sun the face-toface in Ottawa was productive and amiable, touching on areas they can agree on like national unity and avoiding topics they disagree on, such as carbon taxes.

Asked whether Trudeau seemed different from the last time they met in person — prior to the federal election that reduced the PM’S party to a minority government — Ford said he thought that he had changed.

“I think he’s evolved — to be very frank, I think I’ve evolved,” Ford said.

“I think we’re building a relationship and I’m sure we’re going to have a mutually rewarding relationship moving forward.”

A provincial source familiar with what was discussed in the meeting said the federal government appeared open to funding 40% of its ambitious Greater Toronto Area transit plan, including the downtown relief Ontario Line — a key priority of the Ford government.

The main message Trudeau delivered was a desire to work together and focus on areas of shared concern, Ford said.

At the start of the meeting, Trudeau told reporters the two leaders would address a number of issues, including expanded broadband access, transit and business investment.

“There’s a lot that we’re going to be able to talk about,” Trudeau said. “We’re obviously not going to agree on everything but the things that we do agree on I look forward to working respectfully and collaboratively, co-operatively, in ways that are going to benefit the people of Ontario and indeed people right across the country.”

The premier said there was no awkwardness between them despite the recent federal election campaign in which Trudeau frequently criticized him and his policies.

“It was very comfortable on both sides and we both understand growing up in political families this is what happens during elections,” Ford said.

“And once the election is over, then we roll up our sleeves and we get to work because people expect us to work together.”

Many Trudeau voters cast their ballots for him in the 2018 provincial campaign and he’d like them to do it again in the next one, Ford added.

He said there are bound to be some changes now that there’s a minority government in Ottawa.

“I think the tone is going to change a little bit with the federal government, with the prime minister, and he has to be collaborative with other parties in Parliament,” he said. “I’m hoping he works well with the other parties and they come up with some solutions in pulling the country together.”

National unity was a major area of discussion, Ford said.

At an upcoming meeting to be held in Toronto on Dec. 2, the nation’s premiers will hopefully be able to “cool the waters” and focus on a united message, Ford said.

“It’s important that we send a message to the rest of the world and give them certainty ... we’re united as a country,” Ford said he told the PM. “But I also mentioned that the most important area that he needs to focus on is listening to people out west and listening to their concerns.

“He assured me he’s listening,” Ford added.

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Unread postPosted: November 23rd, 2019, 5:48 pm 
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Unread postPosted: November 23rd, 2019, 5:49 pm 
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Unread postPosted: November 27th, 2019, 8:55 am 
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Bill C-69 needs to be scrapped.

By Kenneth Green, energy analyst at the Fraser Institute

Minor tweaks won’t fix major flaws in Bill C-69

Bill C-69, which restructures the environmental assessment process for proposed energy projects, is in the news again.

In the wake of the federal election, talk of western alienation, and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s selection of a new cabinet, the bill, formerly considered a done deal, might be back on the table for discussion.

Or is it?

In the National Post, Jesse Snyder noted that most of Bill C-69 has already passed into law — what’s left is some potential tweaking to “improve” the legislation.

Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi, having discussed the bill with the prime minister, is fine with that.

His focus is on “improving” the bill, not on parliamentary procedure.

That’s all well and good, but the flaws in Bill C-69 will not be fixed by some tinkering around the regulatory edges.

Let’s review its fundamental flaws.

Bill C-69 will lengthen the regulatory process by adding a new phase before the review itself commences.

It “establishes a planning phase for a possible impact assessment of a designated project, which includes requirements to co-operate with and consult certain persons and entities and requirements with respect to public participation.”

Part of the problem with current environmental assessments is that they take too long.

It’s hard to see how adding a new phase of consultation at the front end will reduce the timelines.

Neither will throwing open the doors to multiple intervenors in appealing proposed projects, regardless of their direct relationship to the project.

Bill C-69 removes the “standing” test for public participation, which previously limited public participation to those who would, in theory at least, be directly affected by the construction or operation of a proposed project.

Without a standing test, the regulatory process is open to participants far away from the proposed project who are unlikely to have economic interests in the project or to shoulder its environmental effects.

A little tweaking will also not fix the regulatory “science problem” Bill C-69 was promised to improve.

A government “Chief Science Advisor” will oversee the new process.

This sounds impressive until you realize Bill C-69 also calls for the use of “Indigenous knowledge” and must consider “the intersection of sex and gender with other identity factors.”

Both highly subjective criterion.

As Queen’s law professor Bruce Pardy observes, Bill C-69 takes an inherently flawed subjective environmental assessment process and makes it worse. Environmental assessments will now consider a wider variety of objections to project approval.

It signals government receptiveness to constituencies hostile to project approvals.

Further, he notes that while the Trudeau government said the bill would establish principles and markers to guide decisions, in reality it will instead simply make environmental assessment — an inherently arbitrary, subjective and political process — even more so.

It will further provide legitimacy for discretionary decisions divorced from substantive legal criteria.

Clearly, some slight nips and tucks — buried deep in the weeds of a regulatory process that’s virtually impenetrable to the average citizen — will not repair Bill C-69.

The flaws in the original legislation are well-documented.

Government should replace bad legislation with better legislation, not a last-minute electorally-driven “openness” to consider last minute pre-implementation tweaks.

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Unread postPosted: December 2nd, 2019, 4:06 pm 
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Justine has sent this country's jobs overseas and fucked up climate change.

https://business.financialpost.com/dian ... J7WfL-k8CA
Trudeau’s ridiculous, holier-than-thou climate policies are making emissions much worse
For every pipeline and well and LNG plant that is not built in Canada, the Chinese and Indians will simply burn more dirty coal

The inconvenient truth about the Kyoto-Paris Agreement on climate change is that the 1997 deal has been a major flop because it was flawed from the beginning. It should be scrapped and completely overhauled and Canada’s Liberals should have realized this before they embarked on their ruinous attack against the country’s resource base.

The failure of the agreement, evidenced by emissions that are climbing alarmingly fast, reveal how the Trudeau government’s holier-than-thou approach on climate change is naive and completely misguided. The facts are that Ottawa should have been building lots of pipelines, approving many LNG export projects, and leading an international movement to scrap and try to redo the Paris agreement.

The agreement has been dramatically counter-productive because targets were not applied equally and globally. Of the 192 countries that signed on in 1997, only the 37 developed countries had to agree to reduce emissions. The undeveloped nations — notably China and India — had no restrictions placed on them. They argued that restrictions on emissions would hold back their economic development.

Naturally, this patchwork quilt of regulation has resulted in a gigantic global arbitrage — companies from countries with restrictions — have moved plants or outsourced energy-intensive products such as steel and cement to environmentally dirty nations. For instance, Canada’s imports of steel jumped between 2018 and 2019 alone by 87 per cent, bought, directly or indirectly, from countries not bound by the Kyoto-Paris Agreement. Germany and the United States have done the same.

“Since 1997, the 37 developed countries have reduced CO2 emissions by about 7 per cent, while exempted country emissions rose 130 per cent. And overall global emissions hit a new record in 2018, up two per cent year over year and up 49 per cent since 1997,” according to official figures contained in a report by former Canadian investment bankers who are now investors, Steve Larke and Adam Le Dain. “Driven by good intentions and accelerating energy demand, the world is facing an unintended energy crisis.”

Counterintuitively, Canada must prioritize the building of pipelines to export its oil, with relatively low emissions, and to build natural gas pipelines and dozens of LNG projects on both coasts. This is because every single energy molecule that is exported from Canada to Asia or elsewhere replaces their need to burn dirty coal, or to fuel their vehicles with electricity generated by coal. (This was a platform in the Tory energy policy this election, plus conservation subsidies for consumers.)

Canada’s foolish belief in an international treaty that doesn’t work has left us badly behind. The Americans have dozens of LNG export projects completed or under construction and Canada, with one of the biggest natural gas endowments on the planet, has been unable to get one built — thanks to the usual suspects in Ottawa, British Columbia and Quebec. The country could be a major player in LNG exports but time is running out as Australia and Qatar also move aggressively to compete.

Instead, Trudeau cripples Alberta, subsidizes profitable Loblaw to buy lower-emission refrigerators and campaigns across the country about climate change in two fuel-guzzling aircraft and does nothing to curb demand at home by consumers.

The inconvenient truth is that for every pipeline and well and LNG plant that is not built in Canada, the Chinese and Indians will simply burn more dirty coal.

The Liberals and greens in Canada are not the solution. They are the problem.

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Unread postPosted: December 2nd, 2019, 4:40 pm 
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Unread postPosted: December 2nd, 2019, 4:55 pm 
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Unread postPosted: December 3rd, 2019, 4:42 pm 
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Unread postPosted: December 4th, 2019, 4:59 pm 
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Unread postPosted: December 5th, 2019, 4:14 pm 
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This country is so screwed.

https://capforcanada.com/trudeau-govt-p ... iRh1dr2GHE
Until Prime Minister Justin Trudeau passed Bill C-76 through Parliament, a Canadian citizen living in another country could not vote if they had lived outside of Canada for more than five years.

Say goodbye to this one. PM Trudeau, in his infinite “wisdom,” has kicked open the doors for any ex-pat to vote in the October, 2019 federal election– even if they have not lived in Canada for 50 years.

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Unread postPosted: Yesterday, 4:05 pm 
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Haley suggests Canada made 'deal with the devil' by backing anti-Israel UN resolution
https://www.foxnews.com/politics/haley- ... TxPUUKutHY

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Unread postPosted: Yesterday, 4:52 pm 
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Unread postPosted: Yesterday, 6:09 pm 
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Herman wrote:
Haley suggests Canada made 'deal with the devil' by backing anti-Israel UN resolution
https://www.foxnews.com/politics/haley- ... TxPUUKutHY

What a terrible decision. What was the Canadian pm thinking.

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