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Unread postPosted: September 6th, 2018, 10:35 am 
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He is totally unqualified and out of touch. And worst of all, he has surrounded himself with unqualified sycophants who haven't a clue what they are doing.

By Candace Malcolm of Sun News Media

Not too long ago, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau could rely on his star power to get him through tough political times.

No matter the controversy — when he violated ethics laws, when his budget deficits went billions over budget, when he gave Omar Khadr $10.5 million — Trudeau could trust his pals in the media to change the subject with a puff piece or a torqued article about how Trudeau was doing everything right.

Trudeau particularly used his celebrity to woo liberal journalists south of the border. It was an interview with the New York Times magazine that Trudeau revealed his vision for Canada — as a “post-national state” with “no core identity.” Funny how he’s never repeated that to the Canadian media. But the Times ate it up and spat out a glowing feature about Trudeau’s Canada.

Next, Trudeau headed over to Rolling Stone for another love-in; this time, he was featured on the front cover. “Why can’t he be our President,” read the snarky headline.

But everything changed for Trudeau earlier this year during his disastrous junket to India.

Nothing seemed to go right for Trudeau; he was ridiculed for his inappropriate costumes and dances, shunned by top Indian officials, caught with a Khalistani extremist in his entourage, and exposed for the crass partisanship of the trip.

To top it all off, Trudeau’s office was caught meddling in the civil service — covering up Trudeau’s cringe-worthy mistakes by blaming it on “rogue Indian agents.”

Writing in the Washington Post, Indian journalist Barkha Dutt summed up the feelings of many disillusioned liberals: “I confess, from afar, I used to be a Trudeau fan-girl. But after this trip, I’ve changed my mind… Suddenly, all that charisma and cuteness seem constructed, manufactured, and, above all, not serious.”

It only took a week for Indians to discover that Trudeau is “not serious.” Canadians have been living with consequences of this lack of seriousness for nearly three years.

The latest casualty of Trudeau’s antics is the North American Free Trade Agreement.

Last week, the U.S. and Mexico announced that they had reached a trade deal — sans Canada.

When Trump was first elected, his ire was directed entirely at Mexico. He said he had “no problem” with Canada. That was, until he got to know Trudeau a little better.

While Mexican officials worked tirelessly to make a deal, the Trudeau Liberals mocked and provoked Trump. Trudeau insisted on including his leftist pet causes in the new NAFTA deal — including feminism and climate change, I kid you not — then failed to take a call from Trump the day the new U.s.-mexico deal was announced.

Canadian negotiators are now scrambling to make a last-minute deal amidst threats of a 25% tax on Canadian auto imports.

It goes without saying these tariffs would be devastating for Ontario’s economy — about as bad as the three canceled pipelines have been for Western Canada.

Trudeau can still rely on some Canadian news outlets to spin him out of this mess, but the chorus has shifted. Trudeau has lost his lustre, and has been the subject of a number of devastating American articles calling him “underwhelming” and accusing him of “insufferable moral arrogance.”

Trudeau may have nice hair and a famous last name, but his lack of seriousness is having a devastating impact on the Canadian economy. Without his star-power, Trudeau has little else to offer.

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


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Unread postPosted: September 6th, 2018, 10:38 am 
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Here's another example of Trudeau's lack of leadership.

Trudeau’s odd remarks siding with the court on Trans Mountain ruling

We’re left scratching our heads after some rather bizarre remarks Prime Minister Justin Trudeau delivered on Wednesday concerning the court’s squashing of Trans Mountain.

This is something the PM should be lamenting. But instead, he seems to be half celebrating it. Or, at the very least, gladly rationalizing it.

“When you look at the heart of the decision, the court actually gives a path forward,” Trudeau said of the Federal Court of Appeal decision on radio station 630 CHED in Edmonton.

The court complained about the National Energy Board’s review of the project, calling it flawed. They also said the government failed in their duty to meaningful consultations with First Nations groups.

“(The court) says ‘you need to do better and deeper consultation with Indigenous peoples if you want to get projects like this built, and you have to make sure you’re taking into account all the environmental impacts,” Trudeau continued. “This is something I’ve been saying for a long time.”

Huh? It’s almost like he’s doing a schoolboy’s chant of “I told you so.”

Instead of siding with the court’s terrible decision, he should be instantly challenging it. Both via legal mechanisms and by fighting it out in the court of public opinion.

For starters, Alberta Premier Rachel Notley is right that Trudeau needs to file an appeal immediately. Yet so far Trudeau has not said whether or not the government intends to challenge this in court.

After this, Trudeau would be well-advised to mount an aggressive case for how we actually do have high environmental standards at places like the National Energy Board and we actually do consult extensively with First Nations groups.

It’s not like the NEB approved Trans Mountain unconditionally. They have 157 conditions to meet and their progress on those conditions is regularly updated on the NEB’S website.

When it comes to First Nations groups, it’s laughable to suggest there hasn’t been major consultations. Dozens of First Nations who have the pipeline moving through or close to their land have signed mutual benefit agreements to share in the spoils.

Signing contracts is much more advanced than simple consulting.

The Liberals said they bought the pipeline so they could build the pipeline. Let’s see those words in action.

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


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Unread postPosted: September 6th, 2018, 11:30 am 

Joined: October 4th, 2012, 10:25 pm
Posts: 41381
seoulbro wrote:
Here's another example of Trudeau's lack of leadership.

Trudeau’s odd remarks siding with the court on Trans Mountain ruling

We’re left scratching our heads after some rather bizarre remarks Prime Minister Justin Trudeau delivered on Wednesday concerning the court’s squashing of Trans Mountain.

This is something the PM should be lamenting. But instead, he seems to be half celebrating it. Or, at the very least, gladly rationalizing it.

“When you look at the heart of the decision, the court actually gives a path forward,” Trudeau said of the Federal Court of Appeal decision on radio station 630 CHED in Edmonton.

The court complained about the National Energy Board’s review of the project, calling it flawed. They also said the government failed in their duty to meaningful consultations with First Nations groups.

“(The court) says ‘you need to do better and deeper consultation with Indigenous peoples if you want to get projects like this built, and you have to make sure you’re taking into account all the environmental impacts,” Trudeau continued. “This is something I’ve been saying for a long time.”

Huh? It’s almost like he’s doing a schoolboy’s chant of “I told you so.”

Instead of siding with the court’s terrible decision, he should be instantly challenging it. Both via legal mechanisms and by fighting it out in the court of public opinion.

For starters, Alberta Premier Rachel Notley is right that Trudeau needs to file an appeal immediately. Yet so far Trudeau has not said whether or not the government intends to challenge this in court.

After this, Trudeau would be well-advised to mount an aggressive case for how we actually do have high environmental standards at places like the National Energy Board and we actually do consult extensively with First Nations groups.

It’s not like the NEB approved Trans Mountain unconditionally. They have 157 conditions to meet and their progress on those conditions is regularly updated on the NEB’S website.

When it comes to First Nations groups, it’s laughable to suggest there hasn’t been major consultations. Dozens of First Nations who have the pipeline moving through or close to their land have signed mutual benefit agreements to share in the spoils.

Signing contracts is much more advanced than simple consulting.


The Liberals said they bought the pipeline so they could build the pipeline. Let’s see those words in action.

I saw an interview with a chief of a band along the proposed route who said he was consulted and signed on.


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Unread postPosted: September 6th, 2018, 2:11 pm 

Joined: July 20th, 2015, 2:33 pm
Posts: 938
seoulbro wrote:
He is totally unqualified and out of touch. And worst of all, he has surrounded himself with unqualified sycophants who haven't a clue what they are doing.

By Candace Malcolm of Sun News Media

Not too long ago, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau could rely on his star power to get him through tough political times.

No matter the controversy — when he violated ethics laws, when his budget deficits went billions over budget, when he gave Omar Khadr $10.5 million — Trudeau could trust his pals in the media to change the subject with a puff piece or a torqued article about how Trudeau was doing everything right.

Trudeau particularly used his celebrity to woo liberal journalists south of the border. It was an interview with the New York Times magazine that Trudeau revealed his vision for Canada — as a “post-national state” with “no core identity.” Funny how he’s never repeated that to the Canadian media. But the Times ate it up and spat out a glowing feature about Trudeau’s Canada.

Next, Trudeau headed over to Rolling Stone for another love-in; this time, he was featured on the front cover. “Why can’t he be our President,” read the snarky headline.

But everything changed for Trudeau earlier this year during his disastrous junket to India.

Nothing seemed to go right for Trudeau; he was ridiculed for his inappropriate costumes and dances, shunned by top Indian officials, caught with a Khalistani extremist in his entourage, and exposed for the crass partisanship of the trip.

To top it all off, Trudeau’s office was caught meddling in the civil service — covering up Trudeau’s cringe-worthy mistakes by blaming it on “rogue Indian agents.”

Writing in the Washington Post, Indian journalist Barkha Dutt summed up the feelings of many disillusioned liberals: “I confess, from afar, I used to be a Trudeau fan-girl. But after this trip, I’ve changed my mind… Suddenly, all that charisma and cuteness seem constructed, manufactured, and, above all, not serious.”

It only took a week for Indians to discover that Trudeau is “not serious.” Canadians have been living with consequences of this lack of seriousness for nearly three years.

The latest casualty of Trudeau’s antics is the North American Free Trade Agreement.

Last week, the U.S. and Mexico announced that they had reached a trade deal — sans Canada.

When Trump was first elected, his ire was directed entirely at Mexico. He said he had “no problem” with Canada. That was, until he got to know Trudeau a little better.

While Mexican officials worked tirelessly to make a deal, the Trudeau Liberals mocked and provoked Trump. Trudeau insisted on including his leftist pet causes in the new NAFTA deal — including feminism and climate change, I kid you not — then failed to take a call from Trump the day the new U.s.-mexico deal was announced.

Canadian negotiators are now scrambling to make a last-minute deal amidst threats of a 25% tax on Canadian auto imports.

It goes without saying these tariffs would be devastating for Ontario’s economy — about as bad as the three canceled pipelines have been for Western Canada.

Trudeau can still rely on some Canadian news outlets to spin him out of this mess, but the chorus has shifted. Trudeau has lost his lustre, and has been the subject of a number of devastating American articles calling him “underwhelming” and accusing him of “insufferable moral arrogance.”

Trudeau may have nice hair and a famous last name, but his lack of seriousness is having a devastating impact on the Canadian economy. Without his star-power, Trudeau has little else to offer.

Those tariffs on auto parts could have been avoided if the Liberals would have stopped playing games and get down to some real negotiations like the Mexicans did. When Canadians start losing jobs, blame Trudeau.

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Unread postPosted: September 6th, 2018, 4:58 pm 
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There won't be a blue collar, middle class job left in the country if Trudeau is reelected.

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“No issue better illustrates the divide between America’s working class and America’s political class than illegal immigration- Donald J. Trump.


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Unread postPosted: September 6th, 2018, 9:21 pm 
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Unread postPosted: September 6th, 2018, 10:14 pm 

Joined: October 4th, 2012, 10:25 pm
Posts: 41381
Herman wrote:
Image

I seldom take internet memes seriously.


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Unread postPosted: September 7th, 2018, 6:22 am 

Joined: October 4th, 2012, 10:25 pm
Posts: 41381
These numbers don't tell the whole story anymore than the big gain in August masked a significant drop in full time employment..

The trend in Canada seems to be toward lower quality casual work..

Meanwhile the USA added 201,000 jobs in August beating expectations of 190,000.


Economy lost 51,600 jobs in August: StatsCan

OTTAWA -- The economy lost 51,600 jobs last month in a decrease that drove up the unemployment rate and essentially wiped out a big gain in July, Statistics Canada said Friday.

The country's jobless rate hit six per cent in August, up from its 5.8 per cent reading in July, said the agency's labour force survey.

Economists had expected an increase of 5,000 jobs for August and the unemployment rate to be 5.9 per cent, according to Thomson Reuters Eikon.

The drop last month was fuelled by a loss of 92,000 part-time positions. On the positive side, however, the number of full-time jobs in August rose by 40,400.

Ontario experienced the biggest decrease of the provinces by far with a loss of 80,100 jobs -- almost all of which were part time. The reading represented a drop of 1.1 per cent for the province and pushed its unemployment rate up to 5.7 per cent, from 5.4 per cent.

Alberta gained 16,200 jobs last month, 11,000 of which were full time, for an overall increase of 0.7 per cent.

Provincial rates for August (numbers from the previous month in brackets)

Newfoundland and Labrador 14.4 per cent (15.4)
Prince Edward Island 9.3 (9.5)
Nova Scotia 8.4 (8.0)
New Brunswick 8.3 (7.5)
Quebec 5.6 (5.6)
Ontario 5.7 (5.4)
Manitoba 5.8 (6.0)
Saskatchewan 6.7 (6.6)
Alberta 6.7 (6.7)
British Columbia 5.3 (5.0)
August unemployment rates for Canadian cities

St. John's, N.L. 9.5 per cent (9.0)
Halifax 6.8 (6.5)
Moncton, N.B. 6.7 (6.4)
Saint John, N.B. 5.5 (5.4)
Saguenay, Que. 6.7 (6.8)
Quebec 3.7 (3.9)
Sherbrooke, Que. 4.5 (4.4)
Trois-Rivieres, Que. 4.7 (4.8)
Montreal 6.0 (6.1)
Gatineau, Que. 4.8 (4.9)
Ottawa 4.6 (4.3)
Kingston, Ont. 6.0 (5.9)
Peterborough, Ont. 4.8 (3.3)
Oshawa, Ont. 4.9 (4.4)
Toronto 6.1 (6.1)
Hamilton, Ont. 5.0 (4.7)
St. Catharines-Niagara, Ont. 7.4 (7.0)
Kitchener-Cambridge-Waterloo, Ont. 5.5 (5.7)
Brantford, Ont. 5.0 (5.3)
Guelph, Ont. 4.1 (4.3)
London, Ont. 5.2 (5.4)
Windsor, Ont. 6.6 (6.0)
Barrie, Ont. 6.7 (7.0)
Sudbury, Ont. 6.7 (6.6)
Thunder Bay, Ont. 5.3 (5.0)
Winnipeg 6.5 (6.7)
Regina 6.3 (6.5)
Saskatoon 7.2 (7.1)
Calgary 8.2 (7.9)
Edmonton 6.4 (6.5)
Kelowna, B.C. 6.0 (5.7)
Abbotsford, B.C. 5.0 (4.8)
Vancouver 4.7 (4.4)
Victoria 4.3 (4.2)

https://www.ctvnews.ca/business/economy ... -1.4083824


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Unread postPosted: September 7th, 2018, 12:32 pm 
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What Trudeau's lack of leadership means for skilled unionized workers.

Quote:
Ryan Bruce, director of government and public relations for the union CLAC, said some of the workers were sent home after the Federal Court of Appeal ruling quashed Ottawa’s approval of the pipeline expansion on Thursday.

In an email, Trans Mountain said the pipeline had more than 2,000 people working on it, and by the middle of next year it was expected 5,000 people would have been employed.

Masson said shutting down the project will also have a ripple effect on the economy. A lot of young people are usually employed in the sector and they are starting up households, buying recreational equipment and going on trips, but now they will have to watch their spending.

Brian Cochrane, business manager of the International Union of Operating Engineers Local 115, which represents 11,000 B.C. members in heavy-equipment operations, said he was disappointed in the ruling.

Because it was early in the project, he said a handful of workers were scattered around the province. He expected at least 3,000 workers would have been hired if construction continued.

“These jobs pay mortgages and feed families,” Cochrane said.

https://globalnews.ca/news/4422807/tran ... s-stopped/

_________________
“No issue better illustrates the divide between America’s working class and America’s political class than illegal immigration- Donald J. Trump.


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Unread postPosted: September 7th, 2018, 1:05 pm 
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It's good to see some unions still support projects that are good for it's members. Our union, on the other hand is a tool of rich progs and their destructive causes.

Quote:
At the Ironworkers Local 720 in Edmonton, business agent Gary Savard said many members are now asking how they will pay their bills.

In an already-struggling industry where construction on larger projects such as Suncor Fort Hills have wrapped up, Trans Mountain offered hope, even if it was a year or two away.

"They were hoping for some relief ... Now they don't know," said Savard. "A lot of our members are feeling some anger toward the federal government, thinking maybe they could do more."

On Thursday, not long after construction began on the 1,150-kilometre project, work came to a halt after the Federal Court of Appeal quashed cabinet approval of the Trans Mountain expansion project.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton ... -1.4807395

Any blue collar working person who votes for Trudeau needs their head examined.

_________________
“No issue better illustrates the divide between America’s working class and America’s political class than illegal immigration- Donald J. Trump.


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Unread postPosted: September 7th, 2018, 10:13 pm 

Joined: October 4th, 2012, 10:25 pm
Posts: 41381
iron horse jockey wrote:
It's good to see some unions still support projects that are good for it's members. Our union, on the other hand is a tool of rich progs and their destructive causes.

Quote:
At the Ironworkers Local 720 in Edmonton, business agent Gary Savard said many members are now asking how they will pay their bills.

In an already-struggling industry where construction on larger projects such as Suncor Fort Hills have wrapped up, Trans Mountain offered hope, even if it was a year or two away.

"They were hoping for some relief ... Now they don't know," said Savard. "A lot of our members are feeling some anger toward the federal government, thinking maybe they could do more."

On Thursday, not long after construction began on the 1,150-kilometre project, work came to a halt after the Federal Court of Appeal quashed cabinet approval of the Trans Mountain expansion project.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton ... -1.4807395

Any blue collar working person who votes for Trudeau needs their head examined.

Our prime minister seems to be ignoring all the resource investment money and jobs that are leaving this country for the USA and abroad.


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Unread postPosted: September 8th, 2018, 10:26 am 
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Our auto sector is now subject to job killing tariffs because Trudeau will not stand up for Canadians against the small, but politically powerful dairy cartel. I should add Andrew Scheer doesn't have the stomach to do what's best for the country either.

I would expect this kind of cowardice from the Japanese Liberal Democratic Party when dealing with the rice cartel there, but not in Canada. Our dairy supply management system is antiquated and does not serve thirty seven million people.

Milk Blocking a NAFTA Deal

WASHINGTON — the vexing issue of securing more american access to Canadian dairy remains the major obstacle to the two countries concluding their negotiations on the North american Free trade agreement, says a top trump administration adviser.

Larry Kudlow, the director of president donald trump’s National economic Council, laid that out in the plainest terms possible during a televised interview Friday morning an hour before Foreign affairs minister Chrystia Freeland started her latest meeting with her u.s. counterpart, trade czar robert Lighthizer.

“I think the united States would rather have a trade deal with Canada, but it has to be a good deal, right? and the word that continues to block the deal is m-il-k, OK?,” Kudlow said on the Fox business Network show Varney & Co.

“I’m just saying, ‘Let go. milk, dairy, drop the barriers, give our farmers a break and we can fix some other things.’ So I want to predict. I’ll just say bob Lighthizer is doing a great job and the president is encouraging it.”

Freeland isn’t talking specifics, having made a deal with Lighthizer not to negotiate in public.

but as she emerged Friday from her latest meeting with Lighthizer, she said the talks have entered a “very intense” phase of “continuous negotiations.”

Officials are meeting “24-7” and “when we find issues that need to be elevated to the ministerial level, that’s where ambassador Lighthizer and I need to talk,” Freeland said, adding that “there continues to be a lot of goodwill and good faith on both sides.”

the u.s. wants Canada to open its dairy market to greater american access, as it has done in two previous major trade agreements, with the eu and in a re-booted trans-pacific partnership.

the latter deal offered 10 pacific rim countries access to 3.25% of Canada’s dairy market — and most analysts predict the u.s. will settle for nothing less in Nafta.

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


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Unread postPosted: September 8th, 2018, 12:37 pm 
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Trudeau won't rest until he's destroyed every good industrial job in Canada.

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Unread postPosted: September 19th, 2018, 3:32 pm 
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Canada is quickly losing its economic advantages and Justin Trudeau is responsible.

From Sun News Media


Justin Trudeau is an economic disaster. But that doesn’t necessarily make him unique. Most of Canada’s provincial premiers are economic disasters, too.

The most obvious exceptions at the moment are Doug Ford in Ontario and Scott Moe in Saskatchewan. Unfortunately for Ontario and the rest of the country, Ontario had 15 years of continuous Liberal mismanagement before Ford.

Canada has traditionally had three means to attract foreign investment: a highly educated workforce, abundant natural resources and easy access to the U.S. market. After Stephen Harper became prime minister in 2006, a fourth means was added – tax competitiveness.

But under all the recent Liberal and NDP governments – federal and provincial – virtue-signalling and social grandstanding have taken the place of sound fiscal and economic management.

Trudeau and the lefty premiers have already destroyed our tax competitiveness (especially in light of the Americans’ lowering of corporate tax rates). Carbon taxes at the federal and provincial levels, plus the federal Liberals’ desire to punish small business owners with huge new tax increases have made America look much more attractive to companies searching for places to locate or expand.


Trudeau’s obsession with costly and time-consuming (yet largely meaningless) environmental regulations has choked off investment in our energy sector, too. And, if he’s not careful, his insistence on putting social issues ahead of trade issues will cost us ready access to U.S. market through our failure to renew NAFTA.

All this means we have lost two of our four economic advantages as a nation – tax competitiveness and a vibrant resource sector. And we are at risk of losing a third – free trade with the U.S.

And I haven’t even mentioned the effect of courts that have established impossible standards for consultation with First Nations or the effect Trudeau’s new “Indigenous rights framework” could have on driving away mining, timber and energy investors.

Our economy shed nearly 52,000 jobs in August and, according to a new report from Vancouver’s Fraser Institute, capital investment in Canada “has slowed to a 40-year low.”


Corporate investment in new equipment and buildings has grown by just 2.5% annually since the Trudeau government took over. The rate of growth during Harper’s tenure was closer to 20% a year.

Meanwhile, we have a P.M. who complained on a recent trip to Alberta that the energy industry lacked “gender equity.” Just one-quarter of jobs in the oil and gas sector were held by women, he moaned, as if that were an indication of anything.

Trudeau has also made gender equity protections a cornerstone of Canada’s NAFTA demands and has created a new national energy assessment process that includes a “gender analysis” of any new megaproject.

Companies looking to build a new pipeline or refinery, tanker terminal or power plant in Canada, now not only have to satisfy radical environmentalists and First Nations, they now have to please feminist activists, too.

No wonder Statistics Canada numbers show Canada has lost at least $60 billion in energy investment since the Alberta NDP and federal Liberals were elected in 2015. And no wonder oil analysts Wood Mackenzie Ltd. reported in August that international energy firms are poised to invest nearly $300 billion in new projects over the next three years, but very little of that in Canada.

“Social licence” and “green” energy have been obsessions with federal and provincial governments. Ottawa and the provinces have naively believed they could save the planet and will a carbon-free economy into existence, so they have ignored economic fundamentals.

But I guess this cumulative economic cluelessness shouldn’t come as too much of a surprise. Remember during the 2015 federal election Trudeau promised he would build our economy “from the heart outwards.”

_________________
A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


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Unread postPosted: September 19th, 2018, 3:37 pm 
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Unread postPosted: September 19th, 2018, 7:49 pm 
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Will there be more Liberal floor crossers. Justine has not just alienated blue Liberals, he has given them the finger. This aint the party of Paul Martin and John Manley anymore. I expect some Liberals will not seek reelection.

https://torontosun.com/opinion/columnis ... r-could-be
A visit to the Liberal caucus website is an interesting experience. The main page is headshots of all the Liberal MPs in Canada. All 182 of them.

You scroll down the page and occasionally see a familiar face. “Hey, it’s Trudeau!” “Oh look, that’s Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan!” Or: “Oh, that’s what’s-her-face who had that mini-scandal.”

But for the most part you’re seeing their pictures for the first time and reading names you’ve never read before unless you live in their riding.

The most interesting part comes though when you click on their names and read through their bios and learn about their accomplishments.

Take Nick Whalen, who represents St. John’s East. He’s both a lawyer and an engineer and also found time to be director of the Parkinson Society of Newfoundland and Labrador, support wildlife programs in Kenya and coach minor soccer.

Or Montreal-area accountant and MP Emmanuel Dubourg has completed what’s called the “triple play”, earning a CGA, CMA and CA in addition to an MBA. While working as a public service accountant for 20 years he also taught post-secondary school.

Before Karen McCrimmon served as an Ottawa-area MP she served her country as the first woman to command a Canadian Forces flying squadron. The list goes on.

To his credit, Trudeau managed to recruit some impressive talent to run under the Liberal banner in 2015. And many of them have far more robust resumes than the PM’s.

Yet these accomplished people haven’t been appointed to cabinet. Few are lucky to be Parliamentary Secretaries. Instead, they just sit there and take orders from Trudeau and Gerald Butts.

Part of this is just politics. Trudeau’s inner circle didn’t expect to win such a commanding majority and there are only so many posts you can give people to keep them happy.

Then again it’s also just politics for people to feel underappreciated, to grow unhappy with their leader, to feel like they don’t fit in anymore.

Leona Alleslev was one of those largely unknown names in the tally of Liberal MPs up until Monday when she announced she was crossing the floor to sit with the Conservatives.

The big question everyone in political circles is now asking is if she’s a one-off or if someone comes next. Alleslev, a former captain in the Royal Canadian Air Force, felt that Trudeau’s views were no longer her own. One Conservative insider told me there was talk about recruiting her for the Tories before she even ran for the Liberals, so let’s assume Alleslev’s motives were largely sincere.

How many others are now out of step with Trudeau? And to the degree that they’d be willing to jump ship? The challenge with the current PM is that he doesn’t do a good job of managing the big tent that is the Liberal brand.

“It’s not just people in tight ridings but any Liberal from the Paul Martin wing of the party,” one Conservative strategist explained to me. They’re going after not just current Liberal MPs but hoping to recruit former Liberal MPs and candidates to the Conservative fold.

While successful leaders like Jean Chretien, Stephen Harper and Jack Layton stood politically in the middle of their respective party philosophies, Trudeau is an outlier. He’s personally on the left side of the Liberal Party of Canada, which alienates fiscally conservative blue Liberals.

The other big motivating factor for Alleslev was that she surely knows her riding of Aurora-Oak Ridges-Richmond Hill has a good chance of swinging back to the Conservatives. She only won by 1,000 points in 2015 and she’s watched as the Ontario PC Party dominated GTA ridings in the provincial election.

There are 35 seats across the country where the Liberals won by 5% or less. Many of them are suburban ridings such as Alleslev’s. Lose those, the Liberals lose their majority. Lose more, they lose power.

Few strategists – Liberal or Conservative – think Alleslev is the first to come in a mass exodus. But it does show the tone has now changed.

A larger issue might be people who just don’t run at the end of the day,” one Liberal strategist told me. “There are a number who are fully pensionable going nowhere. I suspect a number of them will bail closer to the election, which could be problematic.”

The main thing that was confirmed Monday was that disaffection with Trudeau comes from within the Liberal ranks as well, not just outside of it.

_________________
prairie redneck.


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Unread postPosted: September 20th, 2018, 8:17 am 
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Joined: November 17th, 2012, 4:01 pm
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The grits raising income taxes on high income earners has resulted in DECREASED revenues and less charitable giving.

Jason Clemens

In delivering his government’s first budget, Finance Minister Bill Morneau said “we raised taxes for the top one per cent. It’s only fair to ask those who can afford it to pay a little more so that we can help those who need it.”

Sounds simple enough — take from some, give to others in need. But as the late American writer and scholar H. L. Mencken said, “there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.”

In 2016, Minister Morneau increased the top personal income tax rate to 33 per cent from 29 per cent on incomes above $200,000. The Liberals originally expected to generate $2.8 billion from the tax increase. However, they scaled that estimate back to $2.0 billion one month after being elected in November 2015 — with no mention from the government on how smart successful Canadians might respond to the tax change.

Consider the extensive body of research on the impact of taxation on a variety of important economic decisions, which shows that increasing personal income tax rates, especially on higher incomes, results in lower investment, savings, willingness to work, entrepreneurship and reported income. And this is not just a short-term effect.

Even the Department of Finance studied this in 2010 in its paper The Response of Individuals to Changes in Marginal Income Tax Rates. To quote: “Individuals can alter their real economic behaviour and/or adjust their efforts to reduce taxable income.” Furthermore, Finance said its results were “broadly consistent with other Canadian studies, providing strong evidence that individuals, especially those with higher incomes, do respond to changes in tax rates.”

Low and behold, in November 2016, the government released its financial update showing that personal income tax revenues for 2016-17 would decrease by $1.2 billion. As the government noted then, “The reduction in 2016-17 largely reflects the impact of tax planning by high-income individuals to recognize income in the 2015 tax year before the new 33 per cent tax rate came into effect in 2016.”

Put simply, the government, albeit subtly, acknowledged that people do indeed respond to incentives.

Fast forward to the present and the Canada Revenue Agency’s recently released preliminary data for the 2016 tax year. No surprise, the tax revenue collected from those in the top one per cent (Canadians earning above $250,000 a year) fell by $4.9 billion in 2016. That’s probably worth repeating. Instead of generating $2.8 billion from taxing these Canadians at a higher rate, the government lost $4.9 billion.

But what’s more, the top one per cent also account for nearly 30 per cent of all charitable giving in Canada. Tax them more and something has to give, right?

Devastatingly for Canadians who rely on private charities for assistance, in 2016, Canadians in the top one per cent reduced their charitable donations by $249 million. That’s a lot of money, and charities should be outraged. Not at high-income Canadians, of course, because they still gave $2.4 billion to charity. But at the government for foolishly trying to squeeze ever more from a group that historically pays nearly a quarter of all personal income tax revenue collected by the federal government.

None of this should come as a surprise to Finance Minister Morneau. In addition to his own department’s research on the behavioural effects of income tax rate hikes on upper-income Canadians, he was the chair of the board of the C.D. Howe Institute from 2010 to 2014. Over that period, C.D. Howe Institute published several studies on the impact of increased personal income taxes. One in particular looked at Ontario’s implementation of a new tax on the province’s high-income earners in 2012. As the study author noted, “the new tax on high-income earners will likely create more economic costs than benefits: taxpayers’ behavioural responses will reduce revenue over the long run by more than the province can expect to collect from the tax hike.”

Need we say more?

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Unread postPosted: September 20th, 2018, 7:43 pm 
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Joined: April 1st, 2016, 6:51 pm
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In Trudeau's Canada, we will all soon be serving fries, driving for Uber or making beds in hotels. More likely doing all three just to make ends meet.

‘Permanent Damage' To Job Prospects As Canada Shifts To Low-Wage Hiring
Quote:
The latest numbers from Statistics Canada show a job market that’s treading water: there was virtually no change in the number of jobs in June.

But that’s not actually what happened. In reality, Canada lost an enormous amount of higher-paid manufacturing and resource jobs, and replaced them with an almost equal amount of lower-paid service sector jobs.

“The weak details of June's jobs report show Canadian employment to be shifting into lower-wage sectors due to the energy downturn,” wrote Bill Adams, senior international economist at PNC Financial Services.

Employment in higher-paying “goods-producing” sectors such as the oil patch and manufacturing shrank by 46,200 jobs in June, while service-industry jobs such as cleaning hotel rooms or flipping patties at McDonald's expanded by 45,500.
Image

This is being reflected in the wages being offered for new jobs. According to StatsCan, the average wage for a new job has fallen three per cent in 12 months to $18.45 an hour, from $19.05 a year earlier.

A rough ride for men

Emanuela Enenajor, a senior economist at Bank of America Merrill Lynch, says this shift away from production jobs to service jobs is hitting men especially hard, because they dominated the kinds of work that are now disappearing.

“Blue-collar jobs are on the decline, suggesting permanent damage to Canada’s labour force,” Enenajor wrote in a report cited by the Globe and Mail.

She noted that, unlike in previous blue-collar downturns, laid-off workers don’t have many good alternatives.

Those laid off at factories in the 2000s could find jobs in the booming oil business at that time. But those laid off from oil today are unlikely to find jobs in manufacturing — factory employment shrank by 1.8 per cent just in the past year.

The employment rate for men aged 15 to 64 — that is, the percentage of men with a job — fell to 75.2 per cent in June, down from 75.7 per cent a year earlier. In that time, the employment rate for women grew by nearly as much — 0.4 percentage points, to 69.8 per cent.

“Today, the oil patch is firing, construction employment is near its saturation point, and factory jobs are flat,” Enenajor wrote.

“The result is a chronic atrophy of skills and employability of workers who are shut out of the labour force for extended periods.”

https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2016/07/1 ... 45650.html

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“No issue better illustrates the divide between America’s working class and America’s political class than illegal immigration- Donald J. Trump.


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Unread postPosted: September 20th, 2018, 7:55 pm 
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Joined: April 24th, 2015, 7:57 pm
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Solution.

Throw them out.

Get rid of Trudeau.

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Unread postPosted: September 20th, 2018, 8:06 pm 

Joined: October 4th, 2012, 10:25 pm
Posts: 41381
Bricktop wrote:
Solution.

Throw them out.

Get rid of Trudeau.

He is very unpopular in my province, but he will probably win reelention..

Canadians are not fed up yet with the low quality jobs that have replaced good ones in manufacturing and natural resources that have become the new norm under this prime minister.


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