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 Post subject: Re: Wexit
Unread postPosted: December 20th, 2019, 8:08 pm 
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 Post subject: Re: Wexit
Unread postPosted: December 23rd, 2019, 10:02 am 
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WEXIT WOUNDS
Experts say advocates for an independent Alberta should be careful what they wish for


Recent secessionist movements in the world offer few encouraging examples to western Canadians miffed at the federal government and think they’d be better off living in a separate country.

“Wexit” — an apparent play on the nickname for the U.K.’S exit from the E.U. — was in few Canadians’ lexicons before October when Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s Liberals were re-elected, but reduced to a minority and shut out of Alberta and Saskatchewan.

Paul Hamilton, a political scientist at Brock University in St. Catharines, Ont., says separatist movements are usually born out of historic ethnic conflicts.

“And then there is another category of secessions, which are often the hobby horse of a couple of people with an internet connection,” he says.

“Or it’s done as a protest. Or it’s done as, frankly, a joke.”

Western Canadian grievances largely centre on a perceived federal animus toward the oil and gas sector and a belief that the region is making an outsized contribution to Confederation.

The “Wexit” movement aims to form its own political party, elect MPS and push for a referendum on separation. It has branches in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and B.C.

Its platform says it intends to declare independence from Canada, secede from the British Commonwealth, elect a president as head of state and align with the U.S. It also wants to establish its own defence force, police and currency. Costs and logistics are not detailed.

“Secessionists can always be counted on to make it sound easy. But that’s when you know they’re not serious, because it’s incredibly complicated,” says Hamilton.

Texas, which was its own country for nine years in the 1800s, has long flirted with separation from the U.S.

The Texas National Movement, established in 2005, wants an “independent, self-governing nation-state free from the control of the bureaucrats and political class in Washington.” It’s pushing for a referendum on “Texit.”

A recent article in The Atlantic magazine points out an independent Texas would be on the hook for its share of the $22-trillion national debt and an “enormous transition cost.”

And just because a population votes for secession, doesn’t mean it will happen.

Secessionist sentiment in Western Australia has bubbled up periodically over the years. None of its iterations has gone as far as a 1933 referendum in which the state voted to split, but Britain refused to let it happen.

The Spanish region of Catalonia voted for secession in a 2017 referendum that the central government deemed illegal. Criminal cases were brought against several Catalan separatist leaders, spurring recent mass protests.

Errol Mendes, a University of Ottawa law professor who has studied separatist movements, says “Wexit” types should realize there is no automatic right to unilateral independence under Canadian or international law.

“The major teacher in all of this to some extent, whether willingly or unwillingly, is our own Supreme Court of Canada,” he said.

The top court decided in the 1998 Quebec secession reference case that the province can’t split from Canada unilaterally, but could negotiate terms of separation if there was a clear referendum result based on a clear question.

“The duty to negotiate in good faith with the rest of Canada would be huge and potentially insurmountable,” says Mendes.

Splits can be amicable, such as the “velvet divorce” that led to Czechoslovakia’s dissolution into the Czech Republic and Slovakia in the 1990s.

“Would it happen with Alberta? I don’t think there’s a chance of that,” says Mendes.

The possibility of internal divisions in a newly independent state is also a huge issue.

Indigenous people voted overwhelmingly against Quebec separation. First Nations treaties are signed with the Crown, so a western split would be a “recipe for chaos,” Mendes says.

Even though Quebec didn’t separate, it has more control over immigration, pensions and other matters than other provinces.

“Quebec is the best example of a would-be state that has achieved the greatest degree of autonomy within a federal system,” says Hamilton.

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney has rejected secession and formed a “fair deal” panel to look at ways to reduce Ottawa’s influence. Hamilton says: “Political elites are saying, ‘This isn’t going to happen, but we’ll use it to extract benefits from the central government.”’

Secessionists can always be counted on to make it sound easy. But that’s when you know they’re not serious, because it’s incredibly complicated.” Paul Hamilton, brock University political scientist

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 Post subject: Re: Wexit
Unread postPosted: December 31st, 2019, 9:45 am 
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The Kenney government has cut taxes, reduced red tape and genuinely appealed for more international investment. And that has helped. Alberta’s economy is improving.

But Alberta's economy will never boom again so long as Justin Trudeau and his government are willing to block pipelines, ban tanker shipments of Alberta oil, make megaproject approvals all but impossible and just generally scare away investors.

The rise of separatism in Alberta was caused by recognition that the results of Alberta's provincial election changed comparatively little.

Albertans voted for change, for a return to sensible tax rates, oilsands expansion, less debt and private-sector job creation. But that by itself has not changed things much because Ottawa has the final say over whether Alberta's economy grows or not.

And the most discouraging lesson of all: There is almost no hope of meaningful change so long as Trudeau’s Liberals are in charge.

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A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


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 Post subject: Re: Wexit
Unread postPosted: January 2nd, 2020, 1:20 pm 
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seoulbro wrote:
The Kenney government has cut taxes, reduced red tape and genuinely appealed for more international investment. And that has helped. Alberta’s economy is improving.

But Alberta's economy will never boom again so long as Justin Trudeau and his government are willing to block pipelines, ban tanker shipments of Alberta oil, make megaproject approvals all but impossible and just generally scare away investors.

The rise of separatism in Alberta was caused by recognition that the results of Alberta's provincial election changed comparatively little.

Albertans voted for change, for a return to sensible tax rates, oilsands expansion, less debt and private-sector job creation. But that by itself has not changed things much because Ottawa has the final say over whether Alberta's economy grows or not.

And the most discouraging lesson of all: There is almost no hope of meaningful change so long as Trudeau’s Liberals are in charge.

We are in the same boat in Saskatchewan. We will never reach our potential as long as Justine is pm.

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 Post subject: Re: Wexit
Unread postPosted: January 4th, 2020, 7:42 pm 
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 Post subject: Re: Wexit
Unread postPosted: January 14th, 2020, 8:52 am 
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The federal Liberals are truly blind. If the West did separate, it's Trudeau's fault.

By Lorne Gunter of Sun News Media

WEXIT FACES LONG, ARDUOUS JOURNEY
Supporters of independence must build a case for separation to convince the fence-sitters


Defeated Liberal cabinet Minister Ralph Goodale thinks western independence is a bad idea.

Of course he would. He’s a federal Liberal.

When asked by the CBC over the weekend for his reaction to the news that Elections Canada had granted Wexit Canada the right to run candidates in the next federal election, Goodale’s response was that talk of western separation is “entirely counterproductive.”

“It leads people to have great and furious arguments, it leads to divisions being created and it takes people down a counterproductive rabbit hole.”

Can Goodale really, truly not see how Justin Trudeau’s attitude has led plenty of Westerners (Albertans in particular) to desire independence?

Does he honestly think talking of leaving Confederation ruptures national unity more than caving to Quebec by cancelling the Energy East pipeline, refusing to stand up to the B.C. government on Trans Mountain or instructing federal lawyers to make no arguments in support of the pipeline when it was challenged in court by radical First Nations groups?

Seriously, is Goodale unable to see how the Trudeau government passing laws that single out Alberta oil and ban it from being carried by tankers off B.C.’S northern coast is every bit as contentious as angry, frustrated Westerners wondering aloud whether there is any point to staying part of Canada?

This time last year, Canadians were just learning how the Trudeau government put on a fullcourt press to keep the Montreal engineering firm Snc-lavalin in Quebec – including some highly unethical methods. Yet when the energy company Encana, which was once the country’s largest firm by market capitalization, announced it was leaving Calgary for Denver, the

Trudeauites did nothing to convince it to stay – not even ethical methods.

Thanks to Liberal “green” policies, these people are on the verge of losing their jobs, businesses, homes and futures.

But independence is not a short, quick journey. Supporters of independence have to build a case for separation that will convince fence-sitters. They will have to find leaders, win elections, hold referenda, negotiate the split.

The first step is contesting elections. Wexit is now set to do just that

Ottawa’s clear desire to “phase out” the oilsands – and its willingness to let foreign-funded environmental groups “landlock” our oil – amounts to an attack on Westerners and their livelihoods.

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A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


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 Post subject: Re: Wexit
Unread postPosted: January 14th, 2020, 9:54 pm 
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I was reading on Disqus, Eastern Canadians and British Columbians blaming the victims(Alberta and Saskatchewan) because Justine is blocking their economic development. :crazy:

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 Post subject: Re: Wexit
Unread postPosted: January 15th, 2020, 9:17 pm 
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Alberta, Saskatchewan landlocked and abandoned
Blocking Prairie oil is not about the environment. And neither is it about safety. It's all about politics and control

https://www.jwnenergy.com/article/2019/ ... aoQa9q8Pvk
Alberta and Saskatchewan are landlocked. Many territories in the world are landlocked but are prosperous because they don’t have obstructing neighbours.

While a federal tanker ban shuts out Prairie oil from British Columbia’s north coast, oil tankers filled with foreign oil enter the Bay of Fundy in the Atlantic and up the St. Lawrence River.

Similarly, there’s no campaign (nor should there be) to stop the oil flowing out of Newfoundland and Labrador, and Nova Scotia. No prime minister has ever visited those provinces to announce his/her desire that they keep their oil well beneath the ocean.

Blocking Prairie oil is not about the environment. And neither is it about safety. With all their risks, pipelines remain the safest mode of transport for oil, given the alternatives of trucks and trains. The people of Lac-Mégantic, Que., understand this very well.

The war against Prairie oil is 100 per cent political.

If you think I’m taking too much licence when I suggest that Laurentian Canadians mean to subjugate the West, let us be reminded of sentiments Justin Trudeau expressed in a radio interview in Quebec before he became prime minister, before he became better schooled in the political art of concealing what he means. He said that the country can best be run by federal Liberals from Quebec. He said Canada’s troubles at the time were because Albertans were running things. Power, therefore, needed to be wrestled away from Albertans.

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 Post subject: Re: Wexit
Unread postPosted: January 17th, 2020, 10:49 am 
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I'm not opposed to a triple E senate. It would act as a buffer against further Liberal governments undermining the economic interests of prairie provinces. But, it could also lead to gridlock if the senate shoots down every bill that is passed in the House.

Josh Andrus is the executive director of Project Confederation (www.projectconfederation.ca), a non-profit fighting for a better deal for Alberta within the Confederation of Canada.

Any fair deal for Alberta won’t last without democratic reform

It’s now more than 30 years since Preston Manning became the leader of the nascent Reform Party and began his quest to reform the Canadian confederation.

He and his supporters envisioned a new party that would fight for economic and constitutional reform that would bolster the influence of the western provinces while strengthening national unity.

The Reform Party came to represent the idea that “the West wants in” at a time when many were questioning whether they actually did.

Manning knew that the centre of political power in Canada has always resided in Ontario and Quebec and that for the West to have any clout, the Canadian Constitution would need to reflect and respect regional interests.

In order to address this disparity, Reform emphasized the idea of transforming the Senate into an equal, elected, and effective Triple-e Senate.

The idea gained significant support over the years, and yet change proved impossible even with a supportive prime minister, as Stephen Harper saw his own Senate reform proposal rejected by the Supreme Court.

Fast forward to 2020 and, once again, pent up frustrations in Alberta and Saskatchewan have led to calls for significant constitutional reform, or else the West might want out.

Economic activity continues to slow, layoffs continue to roll through the energy industry, tens of thousands have been out of work for multiple years, and if anything, Confederation is far more strained than it was even in the 1980s.

Alberta Premier (and former Reform Party MP) Jason Kenney has assembled a “Fair Deal Panel” of which Manning is a member, along with a cohort of other reputable political names.

It remains to be seen whether Ontario and Quebec will be willing to finally compromise, but one thing is clear to almost everyone in Alberta now — the status quo cannot stand.

The real problem though, is that no matter how “Fair” of a deal — if any — Premier Kenney can wrest from Ottawa, anything that is agreed upon now could be undone almost immediately by any future federal government.

Therefore, in order for any “Fair Deal” for Alberta to last, the deal must include democratic reforms that will protect the deal from being eroded over time.

An elected Senate with effective powers and an equal number of senators per province is the key to preventing this erosion.

A Triple-e Senate would create a legitimate body that could act as a check on the House of Commons.

While not every province would always agree with Alberta’s priorities on every issue, a more representative Senate would strengthen all province’s hands during future Constitutional debates, helping to restore some Constitutional balance.

In a Senate designed to represent the interests of the provinces, rather than the federal government, it would be in each Senator’s interests to protect every other provinces’ interests as well.

Preston Manning’s experience all those years ago should tell him that the only way that Alberta will get, and crucially be able to keep, a “Fair Deal” from Ottawa is to address the fundamental balance of powers between the federal government and the provinces.

Hopefully he can convince the rest of the Fair Deal Panel that it’s time to reopen the Constitution.

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A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers. Friedrich August von Hayek


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